A quick review of tonight's "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" coming up just as soon as I buy a tuxedo off a disgraced magician...

Season 1's "Halloween" was an important episode in the evolution of the series, in that it was the first time that Peralta really got one over on Holt, following a run of episodes that clung rigidly to a formula in which Holt was always right and Jake took 3/4 of each episode to listen to him. Jake needed a win to keep the relationship in balance, and to keep the audience on its toes, and his winning the bet was something the show badly needed.

Both Jake and "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" as a whole have become more confident and versatile in the time since. So Holt not only winning the sequel bet, but making clear that he will likely keep winning bets for years to come, wasn't a problem at all. The equilibrium of that relationship has changed, and it was a pleasure to watch Holt at his most smug lay out the nature of the plan, particularly as Andre Braugher uttered the name of Franz Bluheim again.

The plot mechanics of Jake's hustle and Holt's counter-hustle consumed most of the episode, but there was still time for an amusing Terry/Gina subplot. Terry's probably the show's most sensible character, and Gina easily its most insane, and it's a pairing that's worked well in the past, and that worked well here — and not just because it gave a certain segment of the audience a glimpse of Bare-Chested Gladiator Terry. I particularly liked Gina's dismissal of her job as a factor in her struggle to balance her new studies and her love of dance, and not just because Chelsea Peretti's dancing remains the part of the opening titles that make me happiest.

Another solid outing in a season that's been clicking very well so far. And I like the idea of Halloween bets being a tradition on this show like Ron & Tammy or Bar Wars episodes on some other fine comedies.

What did everybody else think?

Alan Sepinwall has been reviewing television since the mid-'90s, first for Tony Soprano's hometown paper, The Star-Ledger, and now for HitFix. His new book, "TV (The Book)" about the 100 greatest shows of all time, is available now. He can be reached at sepinwall@hitfix.com