"Breaking Bad," "True Detective," "The Good Wife," "Orange Is the New Black," "Veep" and "Louie" are among this year's Television Critics Association Awards winners, in a year when the TCA tried to share the wealth across an absurdly deep season in television.

(The non-televised ceremony, to be hosted by Terry Crews from "Brooklyn Nine-Nine," starts two hours from the time this story is being published; if I can, I'll post some highlights and/or photos tomorrow morning.)

For its brilliant concluding season, "Breaking Bad" was named the Program of the Year, repeating its win from a year ago. "The Good Wife" won for Outstanding Achievement in Drama, while "Veep" and "Louie" tied for Outstanding Achievement in Comedy. "Veep" was one of two double winners this year, as Julia Louis-Dreyfus won for Individual Achievement in Comedy. Meanwhile, "True Detective" won for both Outstanding Achievement in Movies, Miniseries and Specials and an individual drama achievement award for star Matthew McConaughey.

Other winners: Netflix's "Orange Is the New Black" for Outstanding New Program, FOX's "Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey" for Outstanding Achievement in News and Information and ABC Family's "The Fosters" for Outstanding Achievement in Youth Programming. Our two historical awards both went in a comedic direction, with legendary sitcom director James Burrows won the Career Achievement Award, while "Saturday Night Live" won the Heritage Award (a sort of career achievement award for a TV show).

The TCA website has a complete archive of past winners.

What does everybody else think of the winners? Would you have rather seen "The Americans," "Fargo" or something else in one or more of those spots?