<p>Dexter (Michael C. Hall)&nbsp;and Harrison (Jadon Wells)&nbsp;have a strange night out together in the &quot;Dexter&quot;&nbsp;season premiere.</p>

Dexter (Michael C. Hall) and Harrison (Jadon Wells) have a strange night out together in the "Dexter" season premiere.

Credit: Showtime

Season premiere review: 'Dexter' - 'A Beautiful Day'

The final season begins with Deb and Dexter at odds

A quick review of the final season premiere of "Dexter" coming up just as soon as I get the bowling team back together...

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<p>Among the highlights of the final &quot;30 Rock&quot;&nbsp;season:&nbsp;Liz (Tina Fey)&nbsp;got to dress like a princess at her wedding to Criss (James Marsden).</p>

Among the highlights of the final "30 Rock" season: Liz (Tina Fey) got to dress like a princess at her wedding to Criss (James Marsden).

Credit: NBC

If I Had An Emmy Ballot 2013: Outstanding Comedy Series

Celebrating 'Parks and Recreation,' '30 Rock,' 'Louie' and more

Our journey through the Emmy ballot concludes with our second series category: Outstanding Comedy Series. As always, Fienberg will attempt to rank the contenders from most likely to least likely to be nominated, throwing in a bunch of preferential wild cards along the way. And, as always, I will pretend that I am an actual Academy member who has a ballot and therefore has to narrow his choices down to six people.

Same rules apply: we are working off of the actual Emmy ballot, so we can't nominate shows that weren't submitted (like "Bunheads," or most of the primetime animated comedies), nor can we reassign a show to what seems a more appropriate category (say, nudging "Enlightened" from comedy to drama). I'm also steering clear of shows (even ones I historically like) where I didn't see enough of the eligible season to feel confident in picking it (I'm overdue for summer marathons of several FX sitcoms, for instance, and the rest of this season of "Veep," and I haven't seen any of the Hulu episodes of "The Thick of It").

Dan's exhaustive analysis is here, and embedded below (click Launch Gallery to see it), and my picks are coming right up.

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<p>Philip Winchester and Sullivan Stapleton in &quot;Strike Back.&quot;</p>

Philip Winchester and Sullivan Stapleton in "Strike Back."

Credit: Cinemax

'Strike Back' season 3 trailer

Scott and Stonebridge head to Colombia in our first glimpse of Cinemax action drama's new season

Cinemax has released the new trailer for their third season(*) of "Strike Back," the lean, mean and totally fun, badass action drama starring Philip Winchester, Sullivan Stapleton and Rhona Mitra.

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Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, episode 189: 'Dexter,' 'Ray Donovan,' Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore

Dan and Alan also answer your mail

The

Time for the second of this week's Firewall & Iceberg Podcast installments, in which we discuss one old and one new Showtime drama, answer some mail, and continue our summer pilot rewatch with "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."  Next week's homework: "Hill Street Blues" (note: Hulu has placed the first two episodes together as one video, so you can stop around the 48 or 49-minute mark, when the pilot clearly ends) and "The Shield." 

The lineup:

"Dexter" (00:01:15 - 00:13:00)
"Ray Donovan" (00:13:00 - 00:27:30)
Listener Mail - Best New Shows (00:27:45 - 00:34:55)
Listener Mail - What counts as TV? (00:35:00 - 00:44:40)
Summer Rewatch: "The Dick Van Dyke Show"/"Mary Tyler Moore" (00:44:45 - 01:04:20)
 
As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. Or you can always follow our RSS Feed, download the MP3 file or stream it on Dan's blog.
 
And as always, feel free to e-mail us questions for the podcast.
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<p>Richard Gant and Timothy Olyphant in &quot;Deadwood.&quot;</p>

Richard Gant and Timothy Olyphant in "Deadwood."

Credit: HBO

'Deadwood' Rewind: Season 3, episode 4: 'Full Faith and Credit'

Seth tries to negotiate a peace between Hostetler and Steve

For the third summer in a row, we're revisiting David Milch's classic revisionist HBO Western "Deadwood," this time discussing the third season.

While I once upon a time posted two separate reviews so people who hadn't watched the whole series would have a safe place to comment, almost no one bothered commenting on the newbie reviews last year, and they've been ditched. If you haven't finished the series, just avoid the comments of this review and you'll be fine.

Thoughts on episode 4, "Full Faith and Credit," coming up just as soon as I have the delightful surprise of meeting your identical twin...

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<p>Rob Brown and Clarke Peters in &quot;Trem&eacute;.&quot;</p>

Rob Brown and Clarke Peters in "Tremé."

Credit: HBO

If I Had An Emmy Ballot 2013: Outstanding Drama Series

A mix of inevitable nominees and brilliant longshots

Part 9 of our journey through the Emmy ballot brings us to the first of the two big series categories: Outstanding Drama Series. As always, Fienberg will attempt to rank the contenders from most likely to least likely to be nominated, throwing in a bunch of preferential wild cards along the way. And, as always, I will pretend that I am an actual Academy member who has a ballot and therefore has to narrow his choices down to six people.

Same rules apply: we are working off of the actual Emmy ballot, so we can't nominate shows that weren't submitted (like "Bunheads"), nor can we reassign a show to what seems a more appropriate category (say, nudging "Enlightened" from comedy to drama).

Dan's exhaustive analysis is here
, and embedded below (click Launch Gallery to see it), and my picks are coming right up.

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<p>James Gandolfini.</p>

James Gandolfini.

Credit: AP

James Gandolfini eulogized by 'Sopranos' creator David Chase and friends and family

'The feeling was real,' Chase says of his leading man

NEW YORK -- They had been here so many times before, in funeral clothes, looking solemn, huddling close together. But that was fiction. This was real, and this was without the man who always stood at the center of those scripted gatherings, casting a giant shadow upon them.

This was "The Sopranos" cast and crew, and friends and family, coming together one more time to say goodbye to James Gandolfini.

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<p>&quot;Mad Men&quot;&nbsp;creator Matthew Weiner is one of the &quot;Difficult Men&quot;&nbsp;profiled in Brett Martin's new book.</p>

"Mad Men" creator Matthew Weiner is one of the "Difficult Men" profiled in Brett Martin's new book.

Credit: AMC

'Difficult Men' author Brett Martin on the era that gave us 'The Sopranos,' 'Mad Men' & more

What was it like to watch James Gandolfini act? Which creators were easier to get along with?

Over the years, it's given me no end of amusement to witness how often two different networks will develop what seems at first to be the exact same show in the exact same season, whether it's hospital dramas in Chicago ("ER" and "Chicago Hope" in 1994), adults traveling back in time to teenage years ("That Was Then..." and "Do Over" in 2002) or slackers with super powers ("Chuck" and "Reaper" in 2007). Even though many of these doppelgangers turn out to be fairly different in execution, something always seems fishy about the claims that the one show didn't know at first that the other existed, and that "there was just something in the air" that led to them both existing at the same time.

After recent events in my own life, I may have to start taking these claims at face value. As most of you know, I published a book last fall called "The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever," about the transformation in television that happened as a result of groundbreaking new dramas like "The Sopranos," "The Wire" and "Deadwood." Very late in the process of writing it, I learned that another book about this same era, and many of these same shows, was in the works: "Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad," by magazine journalist and author Brett Martin.

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<p>Liev Schreiber is &quot;Ray Donovan.&quot;</p>

Liev Schreiber is "Ray Donovan."

Credit: Showtime

Review: Showtime's 'Ray Donovan' a fixer story with flaws

HitFix
C+
Readers
C
Liev Schreiber, Jon Voight and company star in an assembly gritty drama

The late David Mills wrote for some of the best dramas of the last 20 years, including "The Wire," "Treme," "NYPD Blue," "Homicide" and "ER." But before that he was a journalist and a critic, and he always had a tendency to look at his new industry from the viewpoint of his old one, and to have an unyielding standard for shows that aspired to play in the same ballpark as the ones he'd been lucky enough to work for.

When I was a younger critic, I would often grow enamored of some new show because of its creative pedigree, or an impressive cast, until Mills would cut through all of that and ask me, "Why does this show exist? What does it have to say about its premise that's interesting and distinctive? Why am I watching for anything besides the names and a few good performances?"

I have a feeling Mills would not think too kindly of "Ray Donovan," the new Showtime drama that's debuting Sunday night at 10.

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<p>On &quot;Raising Hope,&quot;&nbsp;Garret Dillahunt's Burt got bar mitzvah'ed this year.</p>

On "Raising Hope," Garret Dillahunt's Burt got bar mitzvah'ed this year.

Credit: FOX

If I Had An Emmy Ballot 2013: Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series

Celebrating the men of '30 Rock,' 'Louie,' 'Raising Hope' and more

Part 8 of our journey through the Emmy ballot brings us to our final acting category, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. As always, Fienberg will attempt to rank the contenders from most likely to least likely to be nominated, throwing in a bunch of preferential wild cards along the way. And, as always, I will pretend that I am an actual Academy member who has a ballot and therefore has to narrow his choices down to six people.

Same rules apply: we are working off of the actual Emmy ballot, so we can't nominate people who didn't submit themselves (like if I wanted to nominate Tony Hale for "Arrested Development" rather than "Veep"), and we have to consider people in the category they submitted themselves for, even if that means supporting actors submitting as leads (Rob Lowe, every year, including this category) or vice versa (Amy Schumer as supporting for a show that's named after her). I also have to feel like I've seen enough of a representative sample to pick someone; Peter Capaldi has been brilliant on "The Thick of It," which is now Emmy-eligible due to its run on Hulu, but I haven't seen any of the Hulu episodes, so I can't consider him.

Dan's exhaustive analysis is here, and embedded below (click Launch Gallery to see it), and my picks are coming right up.

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