<p>Chris Pratt and Adam Brody teamed up for much of the final season of &quot;The O.C.&quot;</p>

Chris Pratt and Adam Brody teamed up for much of the final season of "The O.C."

Credit: FOX

'The O.C.,' 10 years later: J.J. Philbin looks back

The 'New Girl' writer was there for Taylor Townsend, Chris Pratt as Ché and much other silliness
By now, you’ve all surely taken large chunks of time today to read both parts of my interview with “The O.C.” creator Josh Schwartz, since tonight is the show’s 10th anniversary. If your appetite for Seth Cohen-related nostalgia hasn’t been sated by now, I also chatted that day with J.J. Philbin, who joined the writing staff midway through season 1 and stuck around all the way to the end, for all the marvelous silliness involving Ryan and Taylor Townsend, Chris Pratt as Ché, “Je Pense,” etc. Philbin’s now a writer on “New Girl,” but she was happy to walk down memory lane towards Newport Beach.
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<p>In the final season premiere of &quot;The O.C.,&quot;&nbsp;Ryan (Benjamin McKenzie)&nbsp;turned to cage fighting. </p>

In the final season premiere of "The O.C.," Ryan (Benjamin McKenzie) turned to cage fighting.

Credit: FOX

'The O.C.,' 10 years later: Josh Schwartz looks back, part 2

Revisiting Oliver, Johnny's knee and Ryan Atwood, cage fighter
Tonight is the 10th anniversary of the premiere of “The O.C.” on FOX. Last night, I posted the first part of a very long interview with the series’ creator Josh Schwartz, focusing on the show’s origins, casting the main characters and developing the sound of “The O.C.” In part 2, we spend more time on the ups and downs of the series as it continued well past the point anyone expected it to, and as rookie showrunner Schwartz had to figure out what to do after cramming three seasons’ worth of plot into his first one.
 
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<p>Benjamin McKenzie, Mischa Barton and Peter Gallagher in &quot;The O.C.&quot;</p>

Benjamin McKenzie, Mischa Barton and Peter Gallagher in "The O.C."

Credit: FOX

'The O.C.,' 10 years later: Josh Schwartz looks back, part 1

Olivia Wilde as Marissa? Garrett Hedlund as Ryan? And whose idea was Rooney?
Ten years ago Monday night, FOX debuted a primetime soap called “The O.C.” It was a genre that had mostly disappeared from network TV, starring a bunch of unknown young actors and Peter Gallagher’s eyebrows, from a 26-year-old creator named Josh Schwartz who had no real experience in television. And it turned out, for a while, to be a phenomenon and a delight: funny and self-aware, and yet capable of being a sincere, well-constructed teen melodrama. It introduced the world to the concept of Chrismukkah and to many of Schwartz’s favorite indie rock bands. Later seasons were bumpy (though the barely-watched final season was a funny and touching return to form), but that first year was something to behold.
 
In honor of the 10th anniversary, I sat down with Schwartz to revisit exactly how things were done in Orange County. It's a very long interview, so I'm splitting it up into two parts (and several pages among each part, to avoid breaking the site). In part 1, Schwartz and I discuss the show's origins, casting the characters, the music and more. Look for part 2 tomorrow, focusing on some of the bumpier spots like Oliver and Johnny's knee. And later Monday, I'll also have a shorter interview with longtime "The O.C." writer J.J. Philbin, who was one of the minds behind Taylor Townsend, Ché, "Je Pense" and a lot of the wackier moments from that weird, lovely final season.
 
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<p>Chloe Bennet and Clark Gregg in &quot;Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.&quot;</p>

Chloe Bennet and Clark Gregg in "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D."

Credit: ABC

Press Tour: 'Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.' live-blog

Joss Whedon, Clark Gregg and friends discuss the 'Avengers' TV spin-off

A few hours ago, ABC screened the pilot for "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." for critics for the first time. (At least, for those critics who weren't in Ballroom 20 at Comic-Con a couple of weeks ago.) I'll obviously have much more to say about the show when it premieres on September 24 at 8 p.m., but I can say that it has the snappy Joss Whedon dialogue (with an assist from showrunners Jed Whedon and Maurissa Tancharoe), Clark Gregg is fun, and it feels very much like a hybrid of Marvel Comics and "NCIS" (which will be its direct timeslot competitor). Maybe not a great pilot, but "Firefly" is the only Whedon show with a great pilot (not that FOX thought so, as they aired it last), and a lot of promising elements being put in place. 

Whedon, Whedon, Tancharoen and the show's cast will be here at the Television Critics Association press tour in a few minutes, and I'll be live-blogging the panel. Two things to keep in mind: 1)I'll be typing quickly, so there may not be the right number of periods, if any, in the show's title or references to the spy organization; and 2)I will do my best to not give away any notable surprises from the pilot, but in the process, there may be some gaps in the live-blog, as I imagine there will be questions asked about things we just saw.

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<p>Who else is excited to see Peter Capaldi on &quot;Doctor Who&quot;?</p>

Who else is excited to see Peter Capaldi on "Doctor Who"?

Credit: BBC

Peter Capaldi as the new 'Doctor Who' sounds bloody marvelous

Veteran character actor has history with the franchise, comic and dramatic chops

Peter Capaldi is the new Doctor on "Doctor Who," and that sounds just marvelous.

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<p>Katilyn Jenkins, aka Boo from &quot;Bunheads,&quot;&nbsp;kicked off an unexpected running gag at the TCA&nbsp;Awards.</p>

Katilyn Jenkins, aka Boo from "Bunheads," kicked off an unexpected running gag at the TCA Awards.

Credit: Ian Mosley

TCA Awards: Norman Lear to Amy Poehler to Boo from 'Bunheads'

Three very different winners all piroutted for the crowd

Last night, I published the list of TCA Awards winners. It was, as I suspected, a fun night, not just because we got to honor some shows ("Bunheads") and performers (Tatiana Maslany from "Orphan Black") Emmy hasn't noticed, but because there were a lot of terrific speeches and moments. Key and Peele killed as the opening act, doing a TV-centric Obama and Luther sketch (Luther threatened a drone strike if Netflix didn't release its viewing data). Louis C.K. kicked off one running gag by dismissing the TCA Award itself as "a shitty piece of plastic," which several other winners also pointed out, until Mike Schur studied his and said, "It's fine." Kaitlyn Jenkins, aka Boo from "Bunheads," got choked up at the idea of her canceled show winning an award, and Norman Lear and Rob Reiner read hilariously from a transcript of Nixon, Haldeman and Ehrlichman discussing "All in the Family" in the Oval Office.

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<p>&quot;Bunheads&quot;&nbsp;is over, but the TCA&nbsp;was able to give it an award tonight.</p>

"Bunheads" is over, but the TCA was able to give it an award tonight.

Credit: ABC Family

'Breaking Bad,' 'Game of Thrones,' 'Parks and Recreation' win big at TCA Awards

The TCA also recognized 'Big Bang Theory,' Tatiana Maslany, 'Bunheads,' Louis C.K. and more

It was a good night to be a TV critic, as the Television Critics Association bestowed its annual TCA Awards on an eclectic and very worthy collection of shows and individuals in a private ceremony at the Beverly Hilton.

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<p>Brian Cox and Kim Dickens in &quot;Deadwood.&quot;</p>

Brian Cox and Kim Dickens in "Deadwood."

Credit: HBO

'Deadwood' Rewind: Season 3, episodes 8 & 9: 'Leviathan Smiles' & 'Amateur Night'

Wyatt Earp and the Pinkertons come to town, and the theater troupe invites the camp to perform

For the third summer in a row, we're revisiting David Milch's classic revisionist HBO Western "Deadwood," this time discussing the third season.

While I once upon a time posted two separate reviews so people who hadn't watched the whole series would have a safe place to comment, almost no one bothered commenting on the newbie reviews last year, and they've been ditched. If you haven't finished the series, just avoid the comments of this review and you'll be fine.

We're doubling up on episodes 8 and 9 this week. Thoughts on episode both "Leviathan Smiles" and "Amateur Night" coming up just as soon as I distract the nations at large from my fiscal turpitudes and miasms...

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<p>Martin Mull, Giovanni Ribisi, Brenda Song and Seth Green in the &quot;Dads&quot;&nbsp;pilot.</p>

Martin Mull, Giovanni Ribisi, Brenda Song and Seth Green in the "Dads" pilot.

Credit: FOX

Press Tour: 'Dads' cast, creators discuss offensive humor

Is the new Seth MacFarlane live-action sitcom racist?

Under any circumstances, the press tour panel for FOX's "Dads" was going to be an awkward affair. The live-action comedy from Seth MacFarlane and fellow "Family Guy" writers Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild stars Seth Green and Giovanni Ribisi as best friends and business partners whose estranged fathers (Peter Riegert and Martin Mull) breeze into town and offend everyone with their old-school attitudes. Among other gags, it has Mull dubbing a boxing video game "Punch the Puerto Rican," has Riegert offended by being mistaken for the Eric Stoltz character in "Mask," and has Green and Ribisi convincing an employee played by Brenda Song to dress up like a giggling anime schoolgirl to impress a group of Asian investors.

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<p>&quot;New Girl&quot;&nbsp;is much more successful when you factor in non-traditional viewing, but how much money does FOX&nbsp;make on those methods?</p>

"New Girl" is much more successful when you factor in non-traditional viewing, but how much money does FOX make on those methods?

Credit: FOX

Press Tour: FOX's Kevin Reilly abandoning business as usual

Can the broadcast network TV model be reinvented in 2013?

FOX president Kevin Reilly began his press tour executive session with an Oprah Winfrey-length filibuster. Given the season his network had — with the collapse of "American Idol" ratings ending the network's long streak as the highest-rated network on TV — the move wasn't a surprise. Lengthy monologues are one way for TV executives to distract us from the recent bad news at their network (or, at least, to suck away all our will to live or ask tough questions). But Reilly's speech had less to do with trying to change the narrative about Fox than trying to change the narrative about the broadcast network business in general.

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