<p>Coach preps for the big game on &quot;Friday Night Lights.&quot;</p>

Coach preps for the big game on "Friday Night Lights."

Credit: NBC

'Friday Night Lights' - 'Thanksgiving': Pride of the Lions

The season climaxes with the Lions-Panthers game.

For the final time, I reviewed all the episodes for this season of "Friday Night Lights" on my old blog as they aired on DirecTV. Because I can't bring content from the old blog over here, each week I'm going to link to those reviews so you can see what I and the DirecTV audience thought of them back in the fall, then discuss them here.

This week: the season finale "Thanksgiving," in which the Lions and Panthers finally play their game, the Riggins brothers face justice and Coach and Mrs. Coach gather their loved ones around the table for some turkey. So go read the review and tell me what you thought.

<p>Cutty (Chad L. Coleman)&nbsp;on &quot;The Wire.&quot;</p>

Cutty (Chad L. Coleman) on "The Wire."

Credit: HBO

'The Wire' Rewind: Season 3, Episode 10 - 'Reformation' (Veterans edition)

Is a slow train coming for Bunny and Stringer?

We're in the home stretch for these reviews of "The Wire" season three (you can find my reviews of the other four seasons on the siderail at my old blog), and as always, we're doing this in two versions: one for people who have seen the whole series from beginning to end and want to be able to discuss it all, and one for people who are relatively new to the series don't want to be spoiled for what's to come past where they are. This is the veteran version; click here for the newbie-friendly one.

A review of episode 10, "Reformation," coming up just as soon as I got the Bingo tonight...

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<p>Cutty (Chad L. Coleman)&nbsp;on &quot;The Wire.&quot;</p>

Cutty (Chad L. Coleman) on "The Wire."

Credit: HBO

'The Wire' Rewind: Season 3, Episode 10 - 'Reformation' (Newbies edition)

Is a slow train coming for Bunny and Stringer?

We're in the home stretch for these reviews of "The Wire" season three (you can find my reviews of the other four seasons on the siderail at my old blog), and as always, we're doing this in two versions: one for people who have seen the whole series from beginning to end and want to be able to discuss it all, and one for people who are relatively new to the series don't want to be spoiled for what's to come past where they are. This is the newbie version; click here for the veteran-friendly one.

A review of episode 10, "Reformation," coming up just as soon as I got the Bingo tonight...

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<p>Chance (Mark Valley)&nbsp;and Guererro (Jackie Earle Haley)&nbsp;in a scene from the &quot;Human Target&quot;&nbsp;season one finale.</p>

Chance (Mark Valley) and Guererro (Jackie Earle Haley) in a scene from the "Human Target" season one finale.

Credit: Liane Hentscher/FOX

Press tour: New 'Human Target' producer Matt Miller has a few changes to make

More personal connections, different music, same great action.

When I was at Comic-Con - what feels like months ago now - I attended and wrote about the panel for "Human Target," a show I liked last season but didn't love, and one where the raw materials - specifically, leading men Mark Valley, Chi McBride and Jackie Earle Haley, plus some of the best action scenes on TV - were strong but the mix as a whole only really came together in the season finale. The ratings weren't great, and now Fox has moved it to Fridays and brought in "Chuck" producer Matt Miller to be the showrunner. Miller's job is to take the elements that were working and then make the show stronger overall creatively.

At Comic-Con, Miller talked quite a bit about the addition of Indira Varma as the team's new financier, as well as a female thief character named Ames - a role since cast by Janet Montgomery. When I saw him at Fox's press tour day earlier this week, I asked him about other changes he's making, including the exit of composer Bear McCreary.

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<p>Michael Chiklis is a dad-turned-superhero in Greg Berlanti's &quot;No Ordinary Family.&quot;</p>

Michael Chiklis is a dad-turned-superhero in Greg Berlanti's "No Ordinary Family."

Credit: ABC/ERIC MCCANDLESS

Press tour: 'No Ordinary Family' co-creator Greg Berlanti gets his geek on

On Michael Chiklis, Green Lantern, The Flash and more

Greg Berlanti is a nerd.

You wouldn't have necessarily known that if you just went by his TV body of work, which includes "Everwood," "Jack & Bobby," "Brothers & Sisters" and "Eli Stone," among others. In the last year or so, though, Berlanti's geek bonafides have been hard to miss. He's a producer and (along with frequent collaborator and sometime comic book scribe Marc Guggenheim) screenwriter on the upcoming "Green Lantern" movie with Ryan Reynolds. He's working on a screenplay for a film about another DC Comics icon, the Flash. And he and Jon Harmon Feldman have co-created one of this season's more-hyped new series, "No Ordinary Family," starring Michael Chiklis and Julie Benz as the father and mother of a family that gets super powers during a South American vacation gone awry.

I sat with Berlanti a few days ago to nerd it up about how comics have influenced his writing even on more mainstream projects like "Dirty Sexy Money," on what he reads, why he chose which powers each member of the family would have, etc. I should warn those of you who don't necessarily know what the Crisis on Infinite Earths was that there's some hardcore nerditry after the jump, but Berlanti has some interesting things to say about the storytelling process, and the show itself requires no advance knowledge of superhero lore.

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<p>Adrianne Palicki, James Wolk and Eloise Mumford in Fox's &quot;Lone Star.&quot;</p>

Adrianne Palicki, James Wolk and Eloise Mumford in Fox's "Lone Star."

Credit: FOX

Press tour: 'Lone Star' & 'Running Wilde' turn question marks into periods

Two new Fox shows panel well

From a content-generating standpoint, press tour can be enormously valuable. So many people to interview, so many possible stories, so many brains to pick. But as a critic whose job it so often is to review a series based solely on a pilot episode - or to predict how an older show might rebound from a disappointing season - the tour is most useful in helping to push me one way or the other on shows where my opinion comes with reservations.

Simply put, if I had a concern about a pilot or a series and find out that the creative team shares that concern - and, even better, has some thoughts on how to properly address it - that goes a long way in helping to shape my ultimate opinion. Conversely, if they aren't troubled by what I was, or if it becomes clear that they think the strength of their show is different from what I do, then my concerns only increase.

We had a couple of instances of this with veteran shows last week, when the "How I Met Your Mother" creators said all the right things about where season five went astray, and where Paul Lieberstein from "The Office" said he thought the show's most recent year was "a strong season." Obviously, actions will count more than words, and it's possible that "HIMYM" might stay adrift even as the creators try to return to the series' romantic side, just as it's possible that Lieberstein was being diplomatic and/or that the show rebounds anyway. But I've found more often than not that when showrunners say they see their show the way I do, that it's apparent in the finished product.

Yesterday, meanwhile, we had a couple of panels for new shows that had decidedly mixed reactions from the critics - Fox's "Lone Star" and "Running Wilde" - where it felt like the room came away much more confident about their prospects. Some thoughts and quotes after the jump...

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<p>Jayne (Adam Baldwin), River&nbsp;(Summer Glau) and Simon (Sean Maher) find themselves in a sticky situation on &quot;Firefly.&quot;</p>

Jayne (Adam Baldwin), River (Summer Glau) and Simon (Sean Maher) find themselves in a sticky situation on "Firefly."

Credit: FOX

'Firefly' Rewind - Episode 9: 'Ariel'

Simon plans a caper, and Jayne throws in a monkeywrench.

Once again, we're spending Tuesdays this summer revisiting Joss Whedon's outer space Western "Firefly." A review of "Ariel" coming up just as soon as I meditate on the wonders of my rock garden...

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<p>John Slattery on &quot;Mad Men.&quot;</p>

John Slattery on "Mad Men."

Credit: AMC

Firewall & Iceberg podcast, episode 28: Press tour and 'Mad Men'

A busy TCA time, plus Don Draper has a naughty Christmas

The

It's Monday, so Fienberg and I snuck away from press tour for 40 minutes to record another installment of the Firewall & Iceberg podcast, devoted entirely to TCA and then to last night's "Mad Men."
 
The very simple rundown: 

The TCA Press Tour to-date -- 00:00 - 26:45

"Mad Men" -- 26:45 - 39:28
 
As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. Or you can always follow our RSS Feed, download the MP3 file, or stream it at Dan's blog.
<p>&quot;Cougar Town&quot;&nbsp;now has more flavors to offer (like Christa Miller and Busy Philipps being weird), but it's keeping its original title.</p>

"Cougar Town" now has more flavors to offer (like Christa Miller and Busy Philipps being weird), but it's keeping its original title.

Credit: ABC

Press tour: 'Cougar Town' name change not happening

Bill Lawrence says they couldn't find an alternative worth the trouble of switching

Back in the spring, I interviewed "Cougar Town" co-creator Bill Lawrence about the creative turnaround that show made over the course of the season. In that interview, Bill said that they had done research showing that the title was a severe turn-off - that some viewers (mostly women) had no interest in watching anything called "Cougar Town," even though the show had long since stopped being about Courteney Cox trolling for young men. He said he hoped to petition the studio and ABC into agreeing to a title change before season two.

Last Friday, though, Lawrence told Michael Ausiello that the name change wasn't happening, so when I saw Bill at ABC's party last night, I had to get him to elaborate on the subject...

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<p>Seth MacFarlane and the rest of the cast of &quot;American Dad&quot; will do a live table read of an episode at press tour.</p>

Seth MacFarlane and the rest of the cast of "American Dad" will do a live table read of an episode at press tour.

Credit: FOX

A day in the life of press tour: FOX

Lots of new shows, but no new 'American Idol' judges?

Today's FOX lineup is the final broadcast network day of the summer 2010 press tour, but far from the last day of TCA. Tomorrow is a mix of FX and shows produced by Sony, Wednesday and Thursday are PBS, and Friday and Saturday are for all the cable networks that weren't presented with broadcast partners earlier in the tour. Many miles to go before I sleep, starting with one last preview of the day's schedule (all times West Coast, obviously), coming up after the jump...

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