<p>Connie Britton as Tami Taylor on &quot;Friday Night Lights.&quot;</p>

Connie Britton as Tami Taylor on "Friday Night Lights."

Credit: NBC

If I had an Emmy ballot: Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama

Katey Sagal leads a strong field

Emmy Week (and a Half) at HitFix continues, and today's category is Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama.

Once again, Fienberg and I are approaching this two different way. Dan is predicting which actresses have a good shot at a nomination (along with a few wishful thinking suggestions), while I'm saying who would be on my hypothetical Emmy ballot.

Dan's gallery is up, and my picks are after the jump...

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<p>Omar (Michael K. Williams)&nbsp;broods over the consequences of his  actions on &quot;The Wire.&quot;</p>

Omar (Michael K. Williams) broods over the consequences of his actions on "The Wire."

Credit: HBO

'The Wire' Rewind: Season 3, Episode 3 - 'Dead Soldiers' (Newbies edition)

Omar's war with the Barksdales sees casualties, while Bunny's plan takes shape.

Once again, we're spending Fridays this summer revisiting season three of "The Wire." (You can find my reviews of all the other seasons at my old blog.) Two versions each week: one for people who have seen the whole series and want to feel free to discuss things from first episode to last, and one for relative newcomers who haven't seen all the way to the end yet and don't want to be spoiled past the episodes we're discussing. This is the newbie version; click here to read the veteran-friendly one. (Last week's newbie review is here.)

A review of episode three, "Dead Soldiers," coming up just as soon as a stripper delivers my stat sheets...

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<p>Omar (Michael K. Williams)&nbsp;broods over the consequences of his actions on &quot;The Wire.&quot;</p>

Omar (Michael K. Williams) broods over the consequences of his actions on "The Wire."

Credit: HBO

'The Wire' Rewind: Season 3, Episode 3 - 'Dead Soldiers' (Veterans edition)

Omar's war with the Barksdales sees casualties, while Bunny's plan takes shape.

Once again, we're spending Fridays this summer revisiting season three of "The Wire." (You can find my reviews of all the other seasons at my old blog.) Two versions each week: one for people who have seen the whole series and want to feel free to discuss things from first episode to last, and one for relative newcomers who haven't seen all the way to the end yet and don't want to be spoiled past the episodes we're discussing. This is the veteran version; click here to read the newbie-friendly one. (Last week's veteran review is here.)

A review of episode three, "Dead Soldiers," coming up just as soon as a stripper delivers my stat sheets...

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<p>Courteney Cox greatly improved as &quot;Cougar Town&quot;&nbsp;did.</p>

Courteney Cox greatly improved as "Cougar Town" did.

Credit: ABC

If I had an Emmy ballot: Outstanding Lead Actress in Comedy

In which there are just barely six worthy nominees

Emmy Week at HitFix continues, and in fact may be stretched into Emmy Week and a Half, since we're decelerating from two categories a day to one for a bit. Yesterday, Fienberg and I handled comedy lead actors, and now it's time to discuss possible nominees for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.

As always, Dan and I are approaching this from two different angles. Dan is speculating on who will be nominated (along with some wishful thinking), while I suggest whom I would pick if I had a hypothetical Emmy ballot.

Dan's gallery of potential lead actress nominees is up, and after the jump are my picks...

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<p>Jason Lee in &quot;Memphis Beat.&quot;</p>

Jason Lee in "Memphis Beat."

Credit: TNT

Firewall & Iceberg podcast, episode 21: 'Breaking Bad,' 'The Gates,' 'Scoundrels,' 'Memphis Beat' & more

Lots of new shows this week - just not a lot of good ones.

The

 
Busy week for the Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, as Dan and I preview a bunch of new shows (few of them very good, alas), continue our summer run through "Undeclared" and weigh in on the "Breaking Bad" finale. Though I guessed late in the podcast that this would be our longest installment ever, it actually clocks in a little under an hour, and here are the segment times: 
 
ABC's "Scoundrels" and "The Gates" -- 01:55 - 15:35
"Memphis Beat" -- 15:40 - 19:30
"Hot in Cleveland" -- 19:30 - 23:15
ESPN's "June 17, 1994" -- 23:15 - 27:35
"Undeclared" -- 27:40 - 39:35
"Rubicon" -- 39:40 - 45:00
"Breaking Bad" -- 45:25 - 56:35
 
As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. Or you can always follow our RSS Feed, download the MP3 file, or just stream it over at Dan's blog.
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<p>Larry David had a terrific season on &quot;Curb Your Enthusiasm.&quot;</p>

Larry David had a terrific season on "Curb Your Enthusiasm."

Credit: HBO

If I had an Emmy ballot: Outstanding Lead Actor in Comedy

A thinner field, but some solid choices within it.

It's day three of Emmy Week here at HitFix, as Fienberg and I finally move on to our look at leading actors and actresses. As usual, Dan's offering up his predictions for who will be nominated (along with a bit of wishful thinking), while I'm saying who would get my votes if I had a hypothetical Emmy ballot.

First up today is Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. Dan's gallery is already up, and if you click through this story, you can see my picks.

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<p>Mike Zimbalist directing &quot;The Two Escobars.&quot;</p>

Mike Zimbalist directing "The Two Escobars."

Credit: ESPN

Review: '30 for 30' is back with the outstanding 'June 17, 1994' and 'The Two Escobars'

The ESPN documentary series continues to turn out winners.

The only complaint I have so far about ESPN's "30 for 30" documentary series is how irregularly it airs. Because the cable sports giant has so many live events to schedule, the "30 for 30" films don't have a stable timeslot, nor do they air on a consistent basis. Tonight at 10, for instance, the series returns for the first time in more than a month with Brett Morgen's "June 17, 1994" (a look back at an absurd, packed day in sports best-remembered for the OJ Simpson white Bronco chase), and then next week shifts to Tuesday at 9 for Jeff and Michael Zimbalist's "The Two Escobars" (about the intertwining lives and deaths of Colombian soccer star Andres Escobar and drug kingpin Pablo Escobar), then disappears again until the end of July.

But if it can be frustrating to wait and look for new films in the series, it's almost always worth the time and effort. And these next two exemplify the series' depth, breadth and power.

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<p>Wendie Malick, Valerie Bertinelli, Jane Leeves and Betty White in &quot;Hot in Cleveland.&quot;</p>

Wendie Malick, Valerie Bertinelli, Jane Leeves and Betty White in "Hot in Cleveland."

Credit: TV Land

Review: 'Hot in Cleveland'

TV Land tries (and fails) to create an instant classic with Betty White and friends.

"Everybody Loves Raymond" creator Phil Rosenthal liked to say that "I'm doing this show for CBS, but in the back of my mind, it's for Nick at Nite." In other words, while he wanted "Raymond" to be a success in its original run, what he really cared about was creating a comedy that would have an enduring legacy.

Nick at Nite's sister channel, TV Land, currently packs its schedule with "Raymond" repeats, and tomorrow night at 10 introduces its first original sitcom: "Hot in Cleveland," starring Valerie Bertinelli, Jane Leeves and Wendie Malick as three LA pals who accidentally land in Cleveland and decide to stick around a while, in a home with a wacky caretaker played by the great Betty White.

TV Land is, in effect, trying to cut out the middle man, creating their own classic-style sitcoms rather than buying someone else's repeats. Every cable channel goes down this road sooner or later (cue the laments about how MTV no longer plays music videos), and given how few traditional three-camera sitcoms are produced anymore - and, therefore, how many veteran sitcom actors, writers, directors, etc. are looking for work - it's a bit surprising it took TV Land this long to try.

"Hot in Cleveland" is pleasant enough, but it apes the classics far more in its style than its substance. It looks and sounds like the kind of show from the '80s or '90s that eventually wound up on Nick at Nite, but had it actually aired on, say, NBC in 1992, it's doubtful anyone would have remembered it fondly enough to want it preserved in perpetual cable rerun-hood.

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<p>The Emmys may not show Ron Effing Swanson some love, but I&nbsp;will.</p>

The Emmys may not show Ron Effing Swanson some love, but I will.

Credit: NBC

If I had an Emmy ballot: Outstanding Supporting Actor in Comedy

A stacked category deserving of lots of new blood - and one big mustache.

Emmy Week continues here at HitFix, and after this morning's look at the comedy supporting actress contenders, it's time to examine potential nominees for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series.

As always, Fienberg and I are approaching this from two angles. Dan has his take on people he thinks may be nominated (along with some wishful thinking), whereas I figure out who I would choose if I had a hypothetical Emmy ballot.

Dan's supporting actor gallery is up, and if you click through, you can read about my struggles with another loaded category...

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<p>A vending machine led off &quot;The Good Guys&quot;&nbsp;case this week.</p>
<br />

A vending machine led off "The Good Guys" case this week.


Credit: FOX

'The Good Guys' - 'The Broken Door Theory': You make me sick

Is the action/comedy hybrid going too far into the comedy realm?

In its two episodes post-pilot, it seems like "The Good Guys" has stopped trying to straddle the action/comedy line and is going more for straight-up comedy. Bradley Whitford's Texas accent is thicker, his character seems even more unstuck in time (and/or a complete imbecile on obvious subjects like computers), and here he spent the whole episode either puking his guts out or on the verge of doing so.

I know I said in my initial review that I bought Whitford more as an '80s cop parody than as the genuine article, but I think last night's episode probably pushed things too far in that direction. For those of you still watching, what do you think? Did you find "The Broken Door Theory" too goofy, just goofy enough, or would you rather the show keep going more for yuks?

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