<p>Matt Saracen (Zach Gilford) breaks into a funeral parlor in one of the all-time great &quot;Friday Night Lights&quot;&nbsp;moments.</p>

Matt Saracen (Zach Gilford) breaks into a funeral parlor in one of the all-time great "Friday Night Lights" moments.

Credit: NBC/DirecTV

'Friday Night Lights': A look back at its greatness and its greatest moments

A drama that felt so real that it hurt more when it didn't

(Note: This article was originally published in February, when the "Friday Night Lights" finale was about to air on DirecTV. That finale will re-air, in a 90-minute timeslot, tonight at 8 on NBC.)

In the second season premiere of "Friday Night Lights," one of the show's high school characters killed a man who had just tried to rape the girl he liked. Then he and that girl conspired to hide the body and cover up the crime.

This upset people, on a level I haven't often seen even for the biggest of shark jumps. (Heck, even I flipped out about it.) How on Earth, the consensus seemed to be, could a show this good do something this stupid? How dare they ruin this show with this silliness?

That the anger and disbelief over this storyline were so intense is, in an odd way, a testament to the brilliance of the four seasons of "Friday Night Lights" that didn't involve murder and Mexican threesomes and weird age-inappropriate affairs and a meth dealer obsessed with ferrets. People were so furious and dismayed because the show to that point (and almost as soon as that season was put to rest) had been so great - and, more importantly, because it had felt so real.

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<p>Joan Rivers and Louis C.K. on &quot;Louie.&quot;</p>

Joan Rivers and Louis C.K. on "Louie."

Credit: FX

'Louie' - 'Joan': Funny lady

Louie gets a lesson in comedy from Joan Rivers

A quick review of tonight's "Louie" - multiple Emmy-nominated "Louie," no less - coming up just as soon as I want to go to the aquarium...

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Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, episode 84: The 2011 Emmy nominations

Firewall & Iceberg Podcast, episode 84: The 2011 Emmy nominations

Dan and Alan find more to be happy with than to complain about with this year's nods

The

Welcome to the second of this week's two Firewall & Iceberg Podcast installments (three if you want to count the all-"Friday Night Lights" podcast Dan and I recorded in the winter, and that you can listen to safely after the finale airs on NBC tomorrow night), which was almost entirely focused on today's Emmy nominations. The run-down:

Emmys -- 00:00 - 56:30
A few Emmy questions -- 56:30 - 01:08:30
A "Friday Night Lights" question - 01:08:30 - 01:16:20
 
As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. Or you can always follow our RSS Feed, download the MP3 file or stream it on Dan's blog.
 
And as always, feel free to e-mail us at sepinwall@hitfix.com and/or dan@hitfix.com if you have questions you want answered on the show. Please put the word "podcast" in your subject line to make it easy to track them down amid the hundreds of random press releases we get every day.
<p>It was a triumphant morning for &quot;Parks and Recreation&quot;&nbsp;star Amy Poehler.</p>

It was a triumphant morning for "Parks and Recreation" star Amy Poehler.

Credit: NBC

Emmys 2011: Amy Poehler talks about 'Parks and Recreation's outstanding comedy nomination

Also has some blunt talk about Nick Offerman's non-nomination

For the second year in a row, Amy Poehler is an Emmy nominee for her work on "Parks and Recreation." But she's much less excited about that than about the fact that the show itself was nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series. I got on the phone with Poehler for a few minutes to talk about the nominations, about co-star Nick Offerman being snubbed again, and what her unconventional plan is to win the darned trophy this year.

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<p>Clear eyes, full hearts, better late than never:&nbsp;&quot;Friday Night Lights&quot; got its first drama series nomination for its final season.</p>

Clear eyes, full hearts, better late than never: "Friday Night Lights" got its first drama series nomination for its final season.

Credit: NBC/DirecTV

Emmys 2011: 'Parks and Recreation,' 'Friday Night Lights' signal more good than bad

'Justified,' Louis C.K. and some other surprise nominees outweigh the annoying ones

The glass half-empty view of the 2011 Emmy nominations (the full list is here): NBC's ridiculous "Harry's Law" now has as many nominations as "The Wire" ever got, and AMC's maddening "The Killing" now has three times as many nominations as "The Wire" ever got, while NBC's audacious, hilarious "Community" didn't get a single nomination for the second year in a row.

The glass half-full view of the 2011 Emmy nominations: "Friday Night Lights" and "Parks and Recreation" (aka the best drama and comedy on network TV)  were nominated for best drama and comedy, all the "Justified" castmembers who should have been nominated were (even though FX has an uneven track record with the Emmys), and Louis C.K. somehow got nominated for acting, writing and editing (albeit not all for the same show).

In other words, the Emmy voters are always going to do annoying things - especially in the nominating process, which leads to complacent thinking because no one has to have watched anything - but if you go into things prepared to grit your teeth, this year's Emmy nominations had more things to be pleasantly surprised about than things to incite a fist shake at the heavens.

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<p>Greg Cipes and Kristen Bell in &quot;Deadwood.&quot;</p>

Greg Cipes and Kristen Bell in "Deadwood."

Credit: HBO

'Deadwood' Rewind: Season 1, Episode 7: 'Bullock Returns to the Camp' (Veterans edition)

The ex-lawman and the widow Garret get to know each other, and a pair of siblings cause trouble

We're continuing our trip back through the first season of David Milch's epic revisionist Western "Deadwood," and we're continuing to do it with two separate but largely identical posts: one for people who watched the whole series and want to be able to discuss it from beginning to end, and one for people who are just starting out and don't want to be spoiled with discussion that goes past the current episode. This is the former; click here for the newbie-safe version.

A review of episode 7, "Bullock Returns to the Camp," coming up just as soon as I congratulate you on your advanced thinking...

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<p>Greg Cipes and Kristen Bell in &quot;Deadwood.&quot;</p>

Greg Cipes and Kristen Bell in "Deadwood."

Credit: HBO

'Deadwood' Rewind: Season 1, Episode 7: 'Bullock Returns to the Camp' (Newbies edition)

The ex-lawman and the widow Garret get to know each other, and a pair of siblings cause trouble

We're continuing our trip back through the first season of David Milch's epic revisionist Western "Deadwood," and we're continuing to do it with two separate but largely identical posts: one for people who watched the whole series and want to be able to discuss it from beginning to end, and one for people who are just starting out and don't want to be spoiled with discussion that goes past the current episode. This is the latter; click here for the veteran-friendly version.

A review of episode 7, "Bullock Returns to the Camp," coming up just as soon as I congratulate you on your advanced thinking...

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<p>How much do we remember &quot;Gilligan's Island&quot; because of the theme song?</p>

How much do we remember "Gilligan's Island" because of the theme song?

Credit: CBS

Introducing TSORIS, or when great theme songs happen to not-so-great shows

What series are most-remembered for their intro music?

Yesterday's news about the death of Sherwood Schwartz got me thinking again about one of my favorite subjects, and an area where Schwartz excelled like few producers in the history of the medium:

Theme songs.

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<p>Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul in a gallery photo for the new season of &quot;Breaking Bad.&quot;</p>

Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul in a gallery photo for the new season of "Breaking Bad."

Credit: AMC

Review: AMC's 'Breaking Bad' still brilliant in season 4

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The genius of the third season continues as Walt, Jesse and friends return

As a fan, it's what you wait for: those moments when potential turns into production, when raw talent gets harnessed and put to consistent, brilliant use. The sportswriter Bill Simmons calls it The Leap, but the phenomenon exists just as much in the world of entertainment: think Prince with "Purple Rain," or Chris Rock with his "Bring the Pain" special, or season 4 of "Seinfeld."

The pantheon-level TV dramas for the most part haven't needed to make The Leap. You knew that "The Sopranos," "The Wire," "Deadwood" and "Mad Men" were special by halfway through their first seasons, sometimes just after their pilot episodes.

"Breaking Bad," though, took its time. Took its time and steadily improved. Started as a strange but fascinating little show carried largely by a career-redefining performance from former "Malcolm in the Middle" dad Bryan Cranston as a cancer-afflicted chemistry teacher turned aspiring meth lord. Got better as its truncated first season went along, then began to truly find itself in its second season.

Then came the third season, and the level of confidence the creative team (led by writer Vince Gilligan) had developed in that second year turned into full-blown, marvelous audacity. Anything they wanted to do, it seems, they did, and did brilliantly.

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Interview: 'Breaking Bad' co-star Aaron Paul

Interview: 'Breaking Bad' co-star Aaron Paul

On speeches, Emmys, and season 3's big cliffhanger

The new season of "Breaking Baddebuts Sunday night at 10 on AMC, and it's terrific. I'm going to publish my review tomorrow, but I wanted to kick off four days of "Breaking Bad"-related coverage with the first of the three video interviews I conducted when I was in Albuquerque a few months back, this one with one of the show's two reigning Emmy winners: Aaron Paul.

Aaron and I spoke about how the show's third season was full of big speeches for Jesse Pinkman, the Emmy experience, what was going through his mind as he shot the dramatic final scene of that season, and more. I hope you enjoy it, and I apologize in advance for my shoddy FlipCam cinematography. A show as gorgeous as "Breaking Bad" deserves better camerawork than I was able to provide, but hopefully the conversation's entertaining in spite of that. (Worse comes to worst, just listen while looking at pictures of lolcats.)