Joan Rivers was proudly unapologetic to the end
Joan always went there, whether cracking a Holocaust joke or calling Lena Dunham fat. As Hank Stuever notes, "She mouthed off long enough to arrive at one final and strange place in our common culture, in which people are constantly apologizing for what others deem to be inappropriate quips, jokes, tweets, updates, memes, Instagram captions, leaked e-mails — all the many ways we find to fail at our attempts at her kind of humor ... Her sense of humor and her belief only in being funny made her part of a dying tribe, the last remaining people who honestly believe that if you can’t take a joke, you are welcome to go (bleep) yourself. Her descendants include not only the Kathy Griffins and Sarah Silvermans of the comedy world, but also the only person you really want to talk to at a party, the one with the unhinged mouth."
Read Kathy Griffin’s heartfelt appreciation: "I do know I would not be doing what I do if it weren't for Joan”
WEtv has yet to air "Joan & Melissa: Joan Know Best?” Season 4, which already wrapped filming
PBS’ "Women in Comedy” airing Sept. 30 will feature a new interview with Rivers
--Rivers was one of the earliest female comedians to talk in an unfiltered way about being a woman, joking about abortion in the ‘60s
--Read Joan’s funeral plan: "I want my funeral to be a huge showbiz affair with lights, cameras, action”
Barbara Walters pens a tribute: “I can't remember a time when I didn't know Joan Rivers”
Watch Joan Rivers teary 1990 Emmy acceptance speech
Fellow comedians remember Joan // More rememberances
Garry Shandling: "Joan never lost the most precious, child-like part of herself…"
Read the 1965 NY Times Magazine profile of “fast-rising” Rivers
Why “the gays” loved Joan (Hint: “She loved us back”)
—From 5 weeks ago: Listen to Howard Stern’s final interview with Joan
How Joan Rivers changed the red carpet: E! remembers her best moments
"Her delivery was like an automatic sprinkler: fast, relentless and sometimes prone to stick, soaking a comic riff into a muddy swamp”
The story behind Joan’s 3-decade “Tonight Show” ban, which Jimmy Fallon lifted earlier this year
Rivers talked in July about dying: "In your 80s, you’d be foolish not to think about that. I am definitely going to be cremated”
After Johnny Carson mess, Rivers’ work "became meaner, leaner, and, strangely, more soulful than ever before”
Rivers wrote about her Carson breakup in 2012
Rivers did the Proust Questionnaire // The 50 best Joan Rivers jokes
A former Joan writer reveals: "When I worked for Joan, work felt like something I could do forever without a break”
Rivers was a graoundbreaking feminist icon, even though she hated being called a pioneer
Joan’s most memorable insults // 10 moments when Joan was really Joan
Rivers helped redefine a woman’s role in our culture
5 things you never knew about “Joan Molinsky” — she got her big break thanks to Bill Cosby
Britain helped rejuventate her career because she reinforced British stereotypes of typical American behavior
--Rivers was bigger, smarter and culturally far more important than her latter E! work
“I hate people who die of natural causes; they just don’t understand the moment,” Rivers once said. “It’s the grand finale, act three, the eleven o’clock number—make it count!”

Norman Weiss has been doing TV Tattle since the week "Freaks and Geeks" was canceled. He is a Hollywood outsider who was born and raised in Hollywood. "American Idol" and "Dancing with the Stars" are broadcast 2 blocks from his high school.