After many months of #TrueDetectiveSeason2 memes on Twitter and beyond, HBO has finally released the first real look at the second season to the Emmy-winning anthology.

HBO also announced that "True Detective" will premiere on Sunday, June 21.

In addition to first images of stars Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams, Taylor Kitsch and Colin Farrell's Mustache, HBO unveiled an evocative teaser trailer featuring all of the show's leads brooding and looking intense. 

Interestingly, the first "True Detective" teaser is entirely dialogue-free, though rest assured that Nic Pizzolatto wrote all eight episodes. The first two episodes were directed by Justin Lin, but unlike Cary Fukunaga in the initial run, Lin cedes the helm to other directors for subsequent episodes.

Good luck figuring out what's happening based on the teaser. Fortunately, HBO explains the plot:

A bizarre murder brings together three law-enforcement officers and a career criminal, each of whom must navigate a web of conspiracy and betrayal in the scorched landscapes of California. Colin Farrell is Ray Velcoro, a compromised detective in the all-industrial City of Vinci, LA County. Vince Vaughn plays Frank Semyon, a criminal and entrepreneur in danger of losing his life’s work, while his wife and closest ally (Kelly Reilly), struggles with his choices and her own. Rachel McAdams is Ani Bezzerides, a Ventura County Sheriff’s detective often at odds with the system she serves, while Taylor Kitsch plays Paul Woodrugh, a war veteran and motorcycle cop for the California Highway Patrol who discovers a crime scene which triggers an investigation involving three law enforcement groups, multiple criminal collusions, and billions of dollars.

Sure. Why not?

Check out the first teaser:

I'll admit that this did the job for me and now I'm kinda jazzed for "True Detective" Season 2 and I probably wasn't before. 

So consider me properly teased, HBO!

How about y'all?

A long-time member of the TCA Board and a longer-time blogger of "American Idol," Dan Fienberg writes about TV, except for when he writes about movies or sometimes writes about the Red Sox. But never music. He would sound stupid talking about music.