NBC is going back to the past in its latest piece of scheduling for its future.

The network announced on Monday (March 31) that it has given a direct-to-series order to "Aquarius," a true crime drama that will mark David Duchovny's return to broadcast TV.

Set in the late '60s, Duchovny will play an LAPD sergeant tracking a small-time criminal and budding cult leader. That cult leader's name? Charles Manson. NBC teases that Duchovny's character and his young partner will begin an undercover operation into Manson, with the Tate-LaBianca murders on the horizon for future seasons.

NBC offers blurbs aplenty from everybody associated with the project, which will be created by John McNamara ("Profit").

"Event series are a big priority for us, and the combination of a show that charts the lead-up to the Manson murders, along with a television star of the magnitude of David Duchovny, is the very definition of an event," states Jennifer Salke, President, NBC Entertainment. "We’re thrilled to be working with these talented producers, including Marty Adelstein and creator John McNamara, to present something truly original."

Duchovny is completing a seven-season run on Showtime's "Californication" this spring. "Aquarius" will reunite him with NBC Entertainment Chairman Robert Greenblatt. 

"After being involved in the production of both ‘The X-Files’ and ‘Californication,’ it gives me great pleasure to work with David Duchovny for the third time on this compelling drama," Greenblatt states. "I’m especially pleased that he wanted to come to NBC where I know there is a big audience waiting to see him."

Adds Duchovny, "I’m thrilled to be working with Bob Greenblatt again and coming back to broadcast television. I think ‘Aquarius’ has a chance to be a special show and I can’t wait to get going."

Duchovny has won Golden Globes for his work on "Californication" and "The X Files." He has been nominated four four Emmys.

NBC has been aggressive in recent months getting commitments for big-name properties that won't be appearing on the small screen for a long time. On consecutive days in February, the network ordered a 2015-2016 cop drama starring Jennifer Lopez and an event series reboot of "Heroes."

Network sources say neither a production schedule nor premiere window have been set yet.

And before you start suggesting it, Jeremy Davies is too old to play a young Charles Manson. So keep trying. Ben Foster may be closer.

Excited to have Duchovny back on broadcast TV? Excited to have Duchovny freed from "Californication"? Excited to hear the story of Charles Manson another time?