Boy oh boy. So many other shoes keep dropping you'd think the world of late television was an octopus.

The month of April began with David Letterman's announcement that he was retiring from CBS' "Late Show" in 2015.

It took exactly a week for CBS to announce that Stephen Colbert would be coming cover from Comedy Central to take over "The Late Show."

And now, the month of April will end with CBS making a clean late-night sweep.

On Monday (April 28) afternoon, Craig Ferguson announced that he will step down as host of "The Late Late Show" at the end of December.

"CBS and I are not getting divorced, we are ‘consciously uncoupling,’ but we will still spend holidays together and share custody of the fake horse and robot skeleton, both of whom we love very much," Ferguson says in the official announcement, paying loving homage to Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin.

The news broke as part of the afternoon taping of Ferguson's show, which will be broadcast from 12:37-1:37 a.m. ET/PT.

"During his 10 years as host, Craig has elevated CBS to new creative and competitive heights at 12:30. He infused the broadcast with tremendous energy, unique comedy, insightful interviews and some of the most heartfelt monologues seen on television," blurbs CBS Entertainment Chairman Nina Tassler. “Craig’s versatile talents as a writer, producer, actor and comedian speak to his great days ahead.  While we’ll miss Craig and can't thank him enough for his contributions to both the show and the Network, we respect his decision to move on, and we look forward to celebrating his final broadcasts during the next eight months."

Ferguson took over as host of "The Late Late Show" in January 2005, following in the very differently shaped footsteps of Craig Kilborn and Tom Snyder. The show won a Peabody Award in 2009, while Ferguson was nominated for an Emmy in 2006.

The host's blurb specifically references robot skeleton sidekick Geoff Peterson and pantomime horse Secretariat, but as good as "The Late Late Show" has always been with absurdist humor, its run is just as likely to be remembered for more serious moments including Ferguson's tribute to his late father in 2006 and his celebration of his American citizenship in 2008.

Before transitioning to late-night, Ferguson was probably best known for his regular role on "The Drew Carey Show." Ferguson will host the syndicated "Celebrity Name Game" starting this fall and will continue to develop TV projects through his Green Mountain West shingle.

And now... Let the speculation on Ferguson's successor begin! Actually, the speculation on Ferguson's successor began two weeks ago with cryptic tweets from Chelsea Handler, buzz that CBS quickly debunked at the time, but may now get to revisit.

Good times!

Will you miss Ferguson? And who do you think would make a good successor?