<p>Ryan Phillippe in ABC&#39;s &quot;Secrets and Lies&quot; finale</p>

Ryan Phillippe in ABC's "Secrets and Lies" finale

Credit: ABC

'Secrets and Lies' Finale: So who the heck killed Tom Murphy? And who cares?

Did Detective Cornell finally get her man or woman?

When "Secrets and Lies" premiered on ABC in March, Sepinwall and I talked about it on the podcast, but nobody wrote a full review.

What I said in my Take Me To The Pilots entry and what I said on the podcast is what I'd have said in my review: In a year of close-ended shows using the death of a child as a catalyst for an investigation or an investigation of grief, "Secrets and Lies" was the most tawdry and sensationalistic, the one most prone to insulting the intelligence of viewers. 

Two months later, same as it ever was, "Secrets and Lies" ended its first season with a seemingly anti-climactic scene and then instructed viewers to go watch one extra scene either online or on some stupid ap or...

Screw that. 

Season 1 of "Secrets and Lies" ended with a slightly ominous car scene between Abby and Christy. Full-stop.

I don't care what happened in that "extra" scene they put online. 

I'm not ABC's monkey and "Secrets and Lies" isn't and wasn't a good enough show for me to be ABC's monkey. 

Anything that happened in that bonus scene that ABC's making people seek out like "Survivor" contestants on the trail of an Immunity Idol is, as Tina from "Bob's Burgers" would say... NON-CANONICAL.

I watched every second of "Secrets and Lies" and usually giggled maniacally at its stupidity, but I'm not going on a field trip to see more. 

After all, I knew who the killer was from the first episode...

[Whodunnit after the break...]

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<p>Things get rough for Phil Miller in the&nbsp;</p>

Things get rough for Phil Miller in the 

Credit: FOX

'Last Man on Earth' Finale: Will Forte explains that last shot and the season's learning curve

Series creator is aware some people didn't love Phil Miller

Sunday (May 3) night's "Last Man on Earth" finale brought Will Forte's Phil Miller full circle, which has been a long, 13-episode process.

First he was the last person on Earth.

Then Carol arrived and he was just the last man on Earth.

Then Todd came and he wasn't even the last man on Earth.

Then there were more people and soon he wasn't even the last Phil Miller on Earth.

Over 13 episodes, Phil went from alone, to living what he thought was the dream, to realizing his dream was a nightmare and, by the finale, he was sent packing by the community that he brought together and he was, briefly, isolated again before Carol look pity on him. 

And, at the very end of the episode, Phil Miller was going off to a different location with the woman he thinks he loves for now, but we discovered that he isn't the only member of his family alive and his brother (Jason Sudeikis, whose picture appeared in the pilot) is "The Last Man in Space," which would be a cool spinoff except that Sudekis is really busy.

Earlier this week, I watched the "Last Man on Earth" season finale and I sat down for a few minutes with creator/producer/star Forte to discuss the arc of the season and what the  outer space climax meant going forward. We also talked about Phil's development and the midseason lull in which some viewers turned on the character.

Click through for the full Q&A.

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<p>Shirin of &quot;Survivor: Worlds Apart&quot;</p>

Shirin of "Survivor: Worlds Apart"

Credit: CBS

Interview: Shirin Oskooi talks 'Survivor: Worlds Apart'

Why is Shirin sure she had the votes to win if she hadn't been voted out?

On last week's "Survivor: Worlds Apart," several castaways talked about talking much-maligned underdog Shirin Oskooi to the end because of the assumption that nobody would vote for her.

This was crazy-talk and I figured Shirin would have been a lock for at least four votes.

"Five, bro! I had five Jury votes bro, five," Shirin was quick to tell me when we spoke after Wednesday's "Survivor."

Of course, the fact that we were speaking on Thursday meant that Shirin would actually be receiving zero Jury votes, because she was sent to join the Jury herself in a vote that at least had drama thanks to an Idol bluff from Mike. Sensing an inevitable vote against Shirin, Mike feigned like he was going to give the former White Collar member his Hidden Immunity Idol and suggested the ruling alliance would be wise to cannibalize itself. Mike's move caused a couple surprise votes to go against Dan, but he opted not to actually give Shirin his Idol and she went home.

Shirin still insists she didn't expect Mike's Idol and says that the minor upheaval was, itself, a small victory for Team Shirin.

In general, despite a number of unpleasant "Survivor" interactions, with the aforementioned Dan and more dramatically with Will, Shirin sounds positive about her overall experience.

She's very candid about the mistakes she made in over-aligning with fellow superfan Max to start the season and how she'll be a better player if she gets a chance at Cochran-esque redemption.

Oh and who was the fifth vote she was counting on?

You'll have to read Shirin's whole exit interview below...

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<p>&quot;Blue Bloods&quot; finale</p>

"Blue Bloods" finale

Credit: CBS

TV Ratings: 'Beyond the Tank' premiere, 'Blue Bloods' finale boost Friday split

Wanna know how 'The Messengers' is doing? Not great.

Fast National ratings for Friday, May 1, 2015.

The season finale for "Blue Bloods" was easily Friday's most-watched program and led CBS to victory overall, while "Shark Tank" and "Beyond the Tank" paced ABC's normal Friday key demo domination.

Friday's other notable was the lack of apparent preemptions for The CW, letting us see how numbers for "The Messengers" look without interference. The answer? Pretty awful.

Oh and apparently nobody watched last week's Bruce Jenner interview and thought, "Wow. I should be watching '20/20' every Friday now."

Let's get to Friday's numbers...

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<p>&quot;The Amazing Race&quot;</p>

"The Amazing Race"

Credit: CBS

Recap: 'The Amazing Race' - 'Fruits of our Labor'

The teams head to Peru and experience a lot of potatoes

I've been reflecting on Friday (May 1) night's "The Amazing Race" for nearly 20 minutes now and I have to admit this: I have basically nothing to say.

So... Kudos, "The Amazing Race," for cutting together an episode so full of redundant, deja vu moments that I have very little desire to rant or rave or analyze. 

Another episode built around awkwardly wedged in product placement? Sure, why not? Yeah, we've been steadily plugging FitBit all season long, but why not throw in literally the least visually stimulating challenge built around the little fitness bracelets? Yes, tonight's math equation challenge was dull, but it was still less cringeworthy than what "Amazing Race" did with Ford and Travelocity this season. Whatever grace the show once had with product plugs has vanished and now I just cringe whenever a brand name is mentioned. But that's not new. It's been happening all season long.

Another episode built around the amusingly unpleasant interactions between Hayley and Blair? Sure, why not. I don't know how much of it is editing, but you can pretty much take to the bank that every episode is going to have at least one situation in which Blair marches ahead determinedly wrong or stubborn as Hayley runs 10 feet behind him protesting that they went past the correct turn/direction/location previously, with Blair totally ignoring Hayley's yapping and Hayley eventually being vindicated. And Friday's episode started with a vintage passive-aggressive bit of shunning from Blair and the same annoying-but-totally-justified mewling from Hayley. But that's not new. It's been happening all season. [At least Friday's episode also showcased Blair's strengths.]

And another episode in which the team working from the back of the pack never really had a chance to get back into the competition and departed with a drama-free whimper? Yeah, that's happened nearly every week this season. In a season without big, high stakes Detours and Roadblocks, it's been impossible for any pair to either succeed astoundingly at something or fail horrifyingly at something. I assume the producers were going for parity and they achieved it at the top, where three of the four remaining teams have won two Legs apiece and the other team has one Leg, but in negating the chances for excellence, you also negate the chances for failure and you're left without chances for big moves. That's not new. It's been happening all season.

And boy oh boy this all made Friday's Leg a bore.

More after the break...

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<p>NBC&#39;s &quot;Blindspot&quot;</p>

NBC's "Blindspot"

Credit: NBC

'Blindspot,' 'Chicago Med,' 'Heartbreaker' land first NBC series orders

Well, NBC also has 'Shades of Blue' and 'Telenovela' already ordered

TV observers know that while upfronts are the week after next, it's actually next week that ends up being the nonstop maelstrom of renewals, pickups and cancellations.

NBC, which will already get a headstart on the upfront week by announcing its full schedule next weekend, also decided to get a headstart on series pickups, ordering three drama pilots to series on Friday (May 1) afternoon.

Leading the way was no-brainer pickup "Chicago Med," joined by "Blindspot" and "Heartbreaker."

Let's get to what's what:

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<p>Will Forte of &quot;The Last Man on Earth&quot;</p>

Will Forte of "The Last Man on Earth"

Credit: FOX

HitFix First Look: Plotting to kill Phil Miller in the 'Last Man on Earth' finale

Plus, a bit of a preview of the finale

Thanks to several weeks of double-dipping, FOX's "Last Man on Earth" is coming to an end on Sunday (May 3) night, making it a fast run of 13 episodes for the already-renewed comedy.

Titled "Screw the Moon" -- it makes sense in context -- the "Last Man on Earth" finale continues Phil "Tandy" Miller's discomfort with the newly arrived Phil "Looks a lot like Boris Kodjoe" Miller. And, as you can see in this HitFix exclusive scene, Tandy and Todd are plotting ways to take this significant threat out of the picture.

I've seen the "Last Man on Earth" finale and I have a few thoughts and spoiler-free teases, but first check out the clip, which is the very funny opening scene:

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<p>Ellen Pompeo of &quot;Grey&#39;s Anatomy&quot;&nbsp;</p>

Ellen Pompeo of "Grey's Anatomy" 

Credit: ABC

TV Ratings: 'Grey's Anatomy' grief, low 'Big Bang Theory' lead Thursday

'Bones' and the 'Backstrom' finale go low for FOX

Fast National ratings for Thursday, April 30, 2015.

Two hours of "Grey's Anatomy" grieving helped ABC eke out a slim Thursday win among young viewers, while an unusually low-rated "The Big Bang Theory" helped pace CBS' comfortable overall victory. 

"Grey's Anatomy" was down from last week's poorly-kept-secret of a shocker, but it was still the show's second best performance since January.

Thursday was full of ugly numbers, including a series low for "The Blacklist," a dip below The Mulaney Line for "Bones," a low finale for "Backstrom" and an inability to retain a solid lead-in from "American Crime." 

On the more positive side, "Mom" ended its season on a high-ish note.

Let's get to the numbers...

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<p>Travis Fimmel of &quot;Vikings&quot;</p>

Travis Fimmel of "Vikings"

Credit: History

'Vikings' creator Michael Hirst on Floki's darkness, Ragnar's faith and a Season 4 time jump

Who was Harbard? Why does The Seer quote T.S. Eliot? And more...

The third season of History's "Vikings" ended last Thursday.

I was a little bit behind.

I had to catch up on Floki's paranoia and religious fervor, on Ragnar's grief and trickery, on Rollo's military might and, of course, on the epic attack on Paris that produced the climax to what was surely the busiest "Vikings" season to date. It was a run of 10 episodes that began with the establishment of a farming settlement in England, but built to three straight hours of almost non-stop action.

Having hissed at Floki's increased villainy, cheered for Ragnar's clever fulfillment of The Seer's prophesy and pondered a seemingly uncertain future for several characters, it was time to get on the phone with "Vikings" creator Michael Hirst, to unpack some of the details of the season past and other details of the season to come.

When Hirst and I talked in January, we went into depth on the show's spectacularly strong female characters, but the "Tudors" mastermind teased that this was The Season of Floki, a sentiment that I now understand.

Having had several Lagertha-based discussions in past years, this conversation didn't go down that path. It could have, but in 30 minutes with Hirst, you can only get to so much.

Instead, we talked about Floki's darkening and about whether or not the big revelation at the end of the finale -- Ragnar telling Floki he knew about the killing of Athelstan -- was actually a revelation. I poked around a bit about the identity of the mysterious wanderer Harbard and how much of Ragnar's interest in Christianity is real.

I also had some personal intellectual itches to scratch, like inquiring about the amusing moment in which The Seer quoted T.S. Eliot's "Burnt Norton," one of several anachronistic literary homages within the show. We also talked about the passage of time on "Vikings," specifically how many years must've passed during a season drought with lengthy expeditions and campaigns.

We barely scratched the surface of things that interested me about this season, but it's a good conversation about some of what transpired this spring and what's in store for Season 4...

Click through for the full Q&A, with Season 3 spoilers...

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<p>Octavia Spencer and Jaime Pressly of &quot;Mom&quot;</p>

Octavia Spencer and Jaime Pressly of "Mom"

Credit: CBS

Jaime Pressly and Mimi Kennedy discuss their part of the 'Mom' universe

The CBS comedy has its second season finale tonight

Jaime Pressly and Mimi Kennedy have both had good "Mom" news since I talked with them on the set of the CBS comedy in March.

At the time, Pressly was still a "Mom" guest star, but the "My Name Is Earl" Emmy winner seemed very open to getting to be a regular part of the action.

In March, it was announced that Pressly will, indeed, be a regular next season, continuing to chart the journey of wealthy divorcee Jill, who has made several trips to rehab this year.

And at the time, Kennedy was unsure what was happening with Marjorie's cancer, an important Season 1 plotline that was ignored for the first chunk of Season 2.

In recent episodes, it was finally been revealed that Marjorie has been continuing with treatment and that she's now cancer-free.

I held my interviews with Pressly and Kennedy a little long and so there were large conversational chunks about Pressly's future on the show and Marjorie's ambiguous health that have become superfluous or redundant or irrelevant or something. 

Still, as "Mom" reaches the end of its terrific second season on Thursday (April 30), I wanted to run the interviews. I loved a lot of the things Pressly said about the strong women in the cast, as well as her insights into the never-ending single-cam/multi-cam debate. I also thought Kennedy had right insights into the core emotional dynamics in "Mom" and I also enjoyed the discussion at the end about the thought process in selecting Emmy submission episodes. 

Thurday's finale, fortunately, is a good showcase for both Pressly and Kennedy. We see more sides to Jill's ongoing living situation with Octavia Spencer's Regina and we spend more time with Marjorie and her loving cats. It is, in general, quite a fine episode and a dark-but-nimble illustration of the show's evolution.

Click through for my slightly trimmed Jaime Pressly interview on Page 1 and my slightly trimmed Mimi Kennedy interview on Page 2...

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