<p>Kyle Chandler</p>

Kyle Chandler

Credit: Dan Steinberg/AP

Interview: Kyle Chandler explains why 'Spectacular Now' scared him and 'The Vatican' attracted him

And a 'Friday Night Lights' movie? No comment.
It probably isn't accurate to call Kyle Chandler a "revelation" in the Sundance hit "The Spectacular Now." After all, he won an Emmy for "Friday Night Lights" in an iconic role that constantly challenged his range, but never found any limitations. 
 
But maybe it would be accurate to say that the version of Kyle Chandler we see in "The Spectacular Now" is the revelation. In James Ponsoldt's film, which has been performing well in increasingly wide release, Chandler plays  the long-absent father to Miles Teller's live-in-the-moment Sutter, a character discussed off-screen until his on-screen arrival marks one of the film's turning points.
 
It spoils none of the film's pleasure to say that from his stubble to his accent to his posture, this is a very different version of Kyle Chandler. In my review from Sundance, I wrote that "Kyle Chandler is at his least Coach Taylor-y in  a key role," which I meant as a high compliment.
 
With "The Spectacular Now" expanding its theater count, I talked with Chandler this week about why he accepted this image-shifting role, why the part scared him and what he learned from the experience. We also discussed his Ridley Scott-directed Showtime pilot "The Vatican," but when I brought up a possible "Friday Night Lights" movie at the very end of the conversation... Well, you'll see.
 
Click through for the full interview. 
 
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<p>&quot;Lucky 7&quot;</p>

"Lucky 7"

Credit: ABC

Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Lucky 7'

Director Paul McGuigan gives this lottery winner drama some life

[In case you've Forgotten, and as I will continue to mention each and every one of these posts that I do: This is *not* a review. Pilots change. Sometimes a lot. Often for the better. Sometimes for the worse. But they change. Actual reviews will be coming in September and perhaps October (and maybe midseason in some cases). This is, however, a brief gut reaction to not-for-air pilots. I know some people will be all "These are reviews." If you've read me, you've read my reviews and you know this isn't what they look like.]

Show:"Lucky 7" (ABC)
Airs: Tuesdays at 10 p.m.
The Pitch: Remember "Windfall" on NBC? That's right. Nobody else does either. This is totally fresh and new, then! Lottery winners! Sometimes it's not so easy for them!
Quick Response: Watch "Lucky 7" after watching most of the season's other new network dramas. That's my best recommendation. I certainly don't think that "Lucky 7" is great drama, but relative to most of the season's pilots, it's populated with semi-likable characters played by actors who aren't predictable Central Casting retreads and, most importantly, the pilot moves like lightning. For the latter attribute, I give an awful lot of credit to pilot director Paul McGuigan, who did the BBC "Sherlock," as well as the pilots for "Scandal" and "Devious Maids." I don't think McGuigan always directs "well" and he's prone to over-directing, but in overcompensating he gives momentum to situations that sometimes could use a shot of adrenaline. And this is absolutely one of those instances. David Zabel's script is a VAST improvement over his work on "Betrayal" -- this is an example of in medias res time shifting that at least somewhat rewards the viewer -- but it's also pretty generic stuff. [That Zabel also has the worst paced pilot I've ever watched premiering this fall makes me even more inclined to hold McGuigan responsible for what works here.] He's crafted broadly amiable characters, but I'd guess that 90 percent of what I like about those characters comes from the well-assembled cast. There are really solid and immediately inhabited performances from Anastasia Phillips, Louis Antonio Ramos, Isiah Whitlock Jr., Summer Bishil and, particularly, Lorraine Bruce. Kudos to Bruce, who played the same role in the British original "The Syndicate," but I never would have even considered that she originally hails from Manchester. Matt Long is positioned as the reassuringly Caucasian and bland leading man and he acquits himself reasonably. Thanks to McGuigan, "Lucky 7" zips along stylishly and, in 43 minutes, introduces its characters, introduces basic needs and desires for each of the characters and weaves around through time smoothly enough to impose a dash of mystery and a dash of ethical unrest. That's something!
Desire To Watch Again: I would say that that's enough to make "Lucky 7" one of my three or four favorite new network dramas of the fall, but that's such a low bar. Watched amidst a slew of total duds and misfires, this was a pleasant surprise. That doesn't mean I have any anxiousness to see additional episodes, even in a time slot where it's going up against a pair of shows -- "Person of Interest" and "Chicago Fire" -- that I watch regularly, but only occasionally genuinely enjoy. It's possible that I like "Lucky 7" just enough that I'll be willing to defend it when other people criticize it with needless harshness, but not enough that I'm going to be driven to watch it every week. But we'll see. I'll watch a second episode and adapt. This is the capper to ABC's all-new Tuesday and, really, it makes almost no sense. It isn't compatible with the other Tuesday shows on ABC and it's really "soft" for a 10 p.m. show. Dunno.

 

Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Dads' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Super Fun Night'  
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Welcome to the Family' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'The Millers' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'The Goldbergs' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Ironside'
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'We Are Men' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Almost Human' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Back in the Game' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Sean Saves the World' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: The CW's 'Reign' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'The Crazy Ones' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Enlisted' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Betrayal' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'The Blacklist' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: The CW's 'The Tomorrow People' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'Hostages' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Sleepy Hollow' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Trophy Wife' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'The Michael J. Fox Show' 
All of my 2012 Take Me To The Pilots Entries
All of my 2011 Take Me To The Pilots Entries
All of my 2010 Take Me To The Pilots Entries

 

 

Listen: Firewall & Iceberg Podcast No. 198

Dan and Alan talk 'Breaking Bad' and 'Miami Vice'

The

Happy Wednesday, Boys & Girls!
 
This week has been slightly chaotic in terms of scheduling, plus it has also been light on content, but we still managed to make time for a truncated installment of The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast.
 
It's pretty clean and simple: We talked about Sunday's episode of "Breaking Bad," titled "Confessions," and then we also discussed this week's Summer Pilot ReWatch, "Miami Vice."
 
Next week'll be busy with premieres of "Boardwalk Empire," "Luther" and FXX, plus a new "Breaking Bad," but we'll wrap up the Summer Pilot ReWatch the following week. We haven't chosen a pilot to watch yet for that final installment, so suggestions are welcome!
 
Apologies if I'm even more discombobulated than usual. We had to record before my caffeine had fully kicked in.
 
Anyway, here's today's breakdown:
"Breaking Bad" (00:01:20 - 00:30:45)
"Miami Vice" (00:30:50 - 00:53:00)

As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. [Or you can always follow our RSS Feed.] 

And as always, feel free to e-mail us questions for the podcast.

 

 

'Bunheads' says farewell in dance form

'Bunheads' says farewell in dance form

Ginny, Sasha and Amy Sherman-Palladino salute fans and bunheads alike
No *you* stop crying and watching the final "Bunheads" dance.
 
Geez.
 
"Bunheads," which won a Television Critics Association Award for Youth Programming, was cancelled by ABC Family last month, but in this final farewell dance, fans get the chance to bid adieu to Sasha and Ginny and Boo, as well as a number of supporting bunheads.
 
The video, which premiered on Buzzfeed, was directed by Amy Sherman-Palladino and choreographed by Marguerite Derricks and is set to Elton Johns "Blues for Baby and Me."
 
Although Sutton Foster was unavailable and Kaitlyn Jenkins couldn't perform due to an injury, the dance features touching send-off moments for Julia Goldani Telles, Bailey Buntain [The Blonde Bunhead] and "So You Think You Can Dance"  veteran and Season 2 guest star Jeanine Mason. [The other featured dancers are Matisse Love, Ra’Jahnae “Rae Rae” Patterson, Colleen Craig, Maine Kawashima, Eli Gruska, Adam Bernstein, Edgar Khachaturov, Kara Hess and Micah Moch.]
 
And stay tuned to the end for a cameo that's both emotional and a wee bit hilarious.
 
Farewell, "Bunheads." Long may you dance...
 
Check out the good-bye above:
<p>Miley Cyrus gets bearly legal</p>

Miley Cyrus gets bearly legal

Credit: AP

MTV Video Music Awards 2013 Live-Blog

Expect Katy Perry, Drake, Miley Cyrus, 'N Sync and lots of twerking

Welcome, Boys & Girls, to my live-blog for the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, or the "VMAs" as the kids used to call them back when I last watched them.

1946.

I remember it well. The Andrews Sisters twerked their way into America's hearts and a young Glenn Miller stirred up controversy with a remix of "Little Brown Jug."

Follow along as I express confusion at how music has changed and what awful taste "the kids" have.

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<p>&quot;Dads&quot;</p>

"Dads"

Credit: FOX

Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Dads'

It's possible to deal with race in a funny way. This is not how.

[In case you've Forgotten, and as I will continue to mention each and every one of these posts that I do: This is *not* a review. Pilots change. Sometimes a lot. Often for the better. Sometimes for the worse. But they change. Actual reviews will be coming in September and perhaps October (and maybe midseason in some cases). This is, however, a brief gut reaction to not-for-air pilots. I know some people will be all "These are reviews." If you've read me, you've read my reviews and you know this isn't what they look like.]

Show:"Dads" (FOX)
Airs:Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
The Pitch: "Hi, I'm Seth Mac..." "Sold!"
Quick Response: Sigh. OK. I guess I have to do this. A lot has been made of Brenda Song in a schoolgirl outfit as if that's inherently evil. It's not. The problem is that you have two white guys in a position of power forcing a character (who already joked about her strict father beating her with math books) played by a Vietnamese-Thai (by way of Sacramento) actress to fulfill a fetishistic stereotype that is primarily seen as being representative of Japanese culture as a way of wooing Chinese investors (or "Orientals" as one of the eponymous dads calls them), but despite this across-the-board "one size fits all" ignorance, nobody at any point has an iota of self-awareness that they're getting everything wrong or is made aware of their ignorance and, in fact, the plan is validated amidst schoolgirl giggling and additional jokes about diminutive Asian penises. The result is that the punchlines aren't at the expense of ANY of the show's on-screen characters and are, instead, at the general expense of all Asians, that Asians from one country can be manipulated through stereotypes that don't even apply to their culture and must bear the weight of all pan-Asian stereotypes, because nobody writing the darned show can be bothered with specificity. And, for the most part, that's how "Dads" rolls. It just happens that there's an astounding preponderance of Asian jokes in the pilot, so that's the advocacy group that's getting ticked off NOW. A joke about how one character's doddering father once thought "Shiite" sounds like "S***" isn't at that character's expense, but rather at how a religious group's name sounds like feces. The joke "Whatcha playing? Punch the Puerto Rican?" isn't directed at the character who says it, but rather you're supposed to roar at the audacity that anybody would say such a thing at all. I laugh at "Family Guy" and when "Family Guy" is at its sharpest, I usually think that its jokes about race flow either from character or from a commentary on racial assumptions, rather from merely a place of, "Aren't we being edgy!" And yes, as Seth Green told us at press tour, there are also jokes about white guys in the pilot, but I think that even Seth would have to admit that the number of jokes relating specifically to whiteness -- not just jokes directed at characters who happen to be white -- is far smaller than the number of jokes relating specifically to NON-whiteness. And why on earth is a show in which only one main character isn't white -- Sorry, Seth MacFarlane, but your thick-accented Latina maids don't count as "characters" -- building so many of its punchlines around race in the first place? Why not build your main characters first? And if you want us to like them, why not make something *other* than "slightly racist" the first characteristic I'd used to describe every male character on the show? Simply put: "Dads" isn't a bad comedy *because* it's racist. It's racist because it's bad comedy that over-relies on lazy jokes involving race. [Actually, it may be both, but whatever...]  FOX Chief Kevin Reilly is right when he says "Dads" just isn't properly calibrated. That extends to the performances. The two main characters should be roughly equals, but Seth Green is working so big that Giovanni Ribisi has no room to breathe and is basically an afterthought. Martin Mull and Peter Riegert shout every punchline and the audience hoots correspondingly and bafflingly. That it's a grating, unfunny mess is the biggest "Dads" crime, with racism somewhere in the distance.

Desire To Watch Again: Kevin Reilly says to give "Dads" more time and I'm not opposed to that. I've never regretting sticking with "Parks and Recreation." I've only sometimes regretted sticking with "The Big Bang Theory." Of course, I've never stopped regretting sticking with "2 Broke Girls," but it should never be said that I don't give comedies time. In this case, though, if network executives know that the "Dads" pilot is poorly calibrated, but believe in the long-term integrity of the show, why air a pilot that is guaranteed to piss viewers off? Is the cost of ditching the pilot so much higher than the cost of alienating your audience Week 1? Or is FOX assuming that this controversy will be more effective than the show's lame marketing strategy? For what it's worth, I could do a rewrite of the Brenda Song scenes and fix *that* mess, but it wouldn't make the rest of the pilot funny. But I'll give "Dads" a few more episodes out of respect for Mike Scully, whose addition to the production team is the lone thing giving me hope. 

Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Super Fun Night'  
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Welcome to the Family' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'The Millers' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'The Goldbergs' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Ironside'
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'We Are Men' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Almost Human' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Back in the Game' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Sean Saves the World' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: The CW's 'Reign' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'The Crazy Ones' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Enlisted' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Betrayal' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'The Blacklist' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: The CW's 'The Tomorrow People' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'Hostages' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Sleepy Hollow' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Trophy Wife' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'The Michael J. Fox Show' 
All of my 2012 Take Me To The Pilots Entries
All of my 2011 Take Me To The Pilots Entries
All of my 2010 Take Me To The Pilots Entries

 

<p>&quot;Super Fun Night&quot;</p>

"Super Fun Night"

Credit: ABC

Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Super Fun Night'

Rebel Wilson's bad American accent isn't the worst thing here

[In case you've Forgotten, and as I will continue to mention each and every one of these posts that I do: This is *not* a review. Pilots change. Sometimes a lot. Often for the better. Sometimes for the worse. But they change. Actual reviews will be coming in September and perhaps October (and maybe midseason in some cases). This is, however, a brief gut reaction to not-for-air pilots. I know some people will be all "These are reviews." If you've read me, you've read my reviews and you know this isn't what they look like.]

Show:"Super Fun Night" (ABC)
Airs:Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m.
The Pitch:Rebel Wilson, Rebel Wilson and Rebel Wilson.
Quick Response: One line of dialogue. That's all it would take to explain why Rebel Wilson's character in "Super Fun Night" is Australian, rather than American like her lifelong chums. It's "I remember when you first arrived at school." HARD CUT TO... Young Rebel Wilson walks into a school lunchroom wearing an assortment of Yahoo Serious memorabilia. "G'Day!" she says. Everybody in the lunchroom throws tater tots at her other than her two future friends. It need never be mentioned again. Ever. That way, it's totally acceptable for two American girls to have an Aussie bestie. And that way, it's totally acceptable for Rebel Wilson to use a native accent which is a not-incidental part of her comedic appeal. We don't laugh at her because she's Australian, but her comedic voice is based on her VOICE and her cadences and her linguistic rhythm and flow, all things that simply can't be replicated at the same time that Wilson is laboring -- or "labouring" as she'd spell it in her native accent -- with a voice that isn't her own. I can't say with certainty that the "Super Fun Night" pilot would be out-and-out funny if Wilson were Australian, but my certitude that it would be *funnier* is absolute. Look, making Wilson's character Australian wouldn't suddenly give Liza Lapira things to do that are amusing. I've almost always found Liza Lapira to be genuinely funny, but she's funny when playing certain types of characters. This may evolve into one of those characters, but it's not there yet (and I hope they steer away from the character Lapira played on "Don't Trust the B----," just for variety). And making Wilson's character Australian won't change that Lauren Ash's character comes across as perhaps too aggressive and underexplained to be funny (not that overexplaining makes things funny, but sometimes explaining helps make character actions seem organic, rather than forced). Actually, I should take that last bit out of the parenthetical, because what "Super Fun Night" feels, more than anything, is forced. The need to make us believe these three friends are colossal losers feels forced. The desire to show us how willing Rebel Wilson is to laugh at her weight feels forced. The only thing that may not be sufficiently forced is the attempt to convince viewers that the Rebel Wilson character is a capable attorney, as well as the outrageously awkward and unassimiliated person she is throughout. That might help. Instead, "Super Fun Night" is a 22 minute pilot that fails to properly establish its main character, her workplace or her core group of friends (or the overall world of the sitcom, since this pilot looks distressingly cheap, very nearly "Work It"-level cheap, though not quite). And, sadly, none of that would have been fixed merely by making Rebel's character Australian, so I don't know why that's my core complaint in this blurb. A bigger complaint is that I want to like the main character and her friends and, at least so far, I do not.
Desire To Watch Again: Somehow, I got the impression that ABC planned to reshoot and reconceive much of "Super Fun Night," so I had optimism about speedy fixes and excitement about seeing a new version of the pilot. At press tour, though, it became clear that although certain cosmetic changes are being made -- Kelen Coleman, who I actually kinda liked in the pilot is being replaced as the primary adversary -- this is the show the "Super Fun Night" team wants to be making. This worries me. I'll watch two or three more episodes both because I like Rebel Wilson and because, for the most part, I watch the shows after "Modern Family," but I'm more worried than anticipatory. People who don't even like Rebel Wilson when she's in her native form probably needn't bother at all.

 

Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Welcome to the Family' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'The Millers' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'The Goldbergs' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Ironside'
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'We Are Men' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Almost Human' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Back in the Game' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'Sean Saves the World' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: The CW's 'Reign' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'The Crazy Ones' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Enlisted' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Betrayal' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'The Blacklist' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: The CW's 'The Tomorrow People' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: CBS' 'Hostages' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: FOX's 'Sleepy Hollow' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: ABC's 'Trophy Wife' 
Take Me To The Pilots '13: NBC's 'The Michael J. Fox Show' 
All of my 2012 Take Me To The Pilots Entries
All of my 2011 Take Me To The Pilots Entries
All of my 2010 Take Me To The Pilots Entries

 

<p>You couldn't kill a Sharknado with that dinky arrow</p>

You couldn't kill a Sharknado with that dinky arrow

Credit: Syfy

TV Review: Syfy's 'Ghost Shark' is no 'Sharknado'

HitFix
C
Readers
n/a
Richard Moll tries hard, but effort alone does not a 'Sharknado' make
I am writing this review of Syfy's "Ghost Shark" because I want to get the name "Sharknado" in a headline for SEO purposes.
 
It's exactly this sort of blatant opportunism that would make me feel just a tiny bit unclean were it not for the simple fact that the only people with more invested in linking "Ghost Shark" and "Sharknado" in audience minds than online headline hounds are the good people at Syfy. "Sharknado" was a phenomenon that Syfy knows it can't regularly reproduce. The Twitter maelstrom generated by the "Sharknado" premiere was nice, but the word-of-mouth tsunami that followed and that generated the increasingly popular repeat airings and the very real injection of a nonsensical meteorological concept into the vernacular were the true achievements for Syfy. And just because "Ghost Shark" is no "Sharknado" in terms of genuine or guilty pleasure hasn't stopped Syfy from attempting chum up the waters in the hope that viewers will confuse the one with the other. Heck, "Ghost Shark" premieres on Thursday (August 22) night after yet another "Sharknado" encore.
 
As an occasional viewer of Syfy original movies, I can verify that there are tiers. "Sharknado" featured four or five vaguely familiar actors looking for career resuscitation and special effects of a caliber such that you were frequently able to tell what the CG blobs were supposed to be and what they were supposed to be doing. Over the course of the "Sharknado" running time, there were between five and 10 moments in which I laughed out loud, either due to sheer goofy inspiration or marvelous, fully committed awfulness.
 
You think that those expectations represent a low bar for achievement. You think that way until you watch the average Syfy original movie and realize how easy it is to fill 82 minutes with little more than a gleefully mutated title and hints at a plot to justify that title. 
 
In the balance, "Sharknado" was somewhere in the vicinity of 50 percent great title and 50 percent execution, which is close to the Golden Ratio by Syfy standards. Anything more heavily weighted towards the title fails to deliver sustained buzz. Anything more heavily weighted towards execution costs more money than Syfy is willing to spend.
 
"Ghost Shark," in contrast, is probably closer to 75 or 80 percent "great title," with the execution lagging behind. That may not be better than some on the Syfy slate, but it's better than many and there are moments of fun here, even if they come way too early in the movie and set "Ghost Shark" up for a final act that fizzles.
 
[More after the break…]
 
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<p>&quot;American Idol&quot;</p>

"American Idol"

Credit: FOX

What if FOX didn't take a chance on 'American Idol'?

Rupert Murdoch's daughter changed the course of TV history
This week HitFix is revisiting some of the key turning points in recent entertainment history and considering what would have happened if history had turned a bit differently. What if...?
 
In 2001, Simon Cowell and Simon Fuller came to the United States and attempted to pitch a format based on the British hit "Pop Idol," a singing competition show that was making Cowell into a sensation Across the Pond. American networks, however, were not interested. Yes, "Survivor" had opened the door for primetime competition reality programming on network TV, but "Pop Idol" was seen as being less like "Survivor" and more like "Popstars," which aired with minimal success on The WB. But then, the story goes, Rupert Murdoch's daughter Elisabeth, a fan of "Pop Idol," made a passionate pitch for FOX to take an interest in a little show that became...  "American Idol." The rest, as we say, is history. "American Idol" became a summer hit in 2002 and, starting in 2003, it became the irreplaceable centerpiece of FOX's spring lineup, anchoring an unprecedented streak of 18-49 demo crowns for the network and launching countless singing, acting and hosting careers. But... 
 
What if Rupert Murdoch's daughter hadn't been a fan of "Pop Idol"?
 
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Listen: Firewall & Iceberg Podcast No. 197

Dan and Alan talk 'Breaking Bad,' 'Alias,' 'Felicity' and answer lots of mail

The

Happy Monday, Boys & Girls! Live from a spectacularly echo-y corridor of the new HitFix offices in Beverly Hills (and the normally echo-y conference room of Alan's office), it's time for another installment of The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast!
 
With nothing to review this week, we answered mail for a half-hour. Thanks for the mail! We also had a ton to say about this week's "Breaking Bad" episode and then we dedicated a half-hour to our Summer Pilot Rewatch J.J. Abrams double-bill of "Felicity" and "Alias." So it's a long podcast, even if we had nothing to talk about.
 
Our next Pilot Rewatch? "Miami Vice." [The link is to S.1 and you should watch the two-part opener.]
 
Here's today's breakdown:
Listener Mail: Hamm/Cranston Swap (00:01:45 - 00:07:50)
Listener Mail: Gilligan/Weiner Follow-ups (00:08:00 - 00:15:05)
Listener Mail: OnDemand (00:15:10 - 00:20:40)
Listener Mail: ABC Segmenting (00:20:45 - 00:27:45)
Listener Mail: Podcast Show Selection (00:27:55 - 00:34:00)
"Breaking Bad" (00:34:00 - 01:07:15)
Summer Pilot ReWatch: "Felicity"/"Alias" (01:07:30 - 01:38:20)

As always, you can subscribe to The Firewall & Iceberg Podcast over at the iTunes Store, where you can also rate us and comment on us. [Or you can always follow our RSS Feed.] 

And as always, feel free to e-mail us questions for the podcast.