The final episode of "Deadwood" aired nine years ago this month, and ever since the messy cancellation of one of the great dramas of all time, there have been rumors and wishcasting about the idea of a reunion movie. In fact, at the time the show ended prematurely, HBO tried to temper the bad publicity by declaring intentions to make two sequel movies, neither of which happened.

When I interviewed David Milch a few years ago for "The Revolution Was Televised," it was not long after the latest attempt to bring his amazing cast back together had fallen apart. Recalling the initial struggles to reunite everyone, he said, "I thought there was a good chance that we would do the movie, but gradually, it was like sand. It washed away. I’d still love to do one.”

Might he finally be getting that chance? Check out this tweet from Garret Dillahunt, who memorably played two different "Deadwood" villains, drunk gambler Jack McCall and serial killer Francis Wolcott:

We've been here before, obviously, and there are huge logistical hurdles to overcome, not just in reassembling at least some of the cast (though Timothy Olyphant's schedule is much more open since "Justified" ended), but rebuilding the "Deadwood" set itself, which was dismantled and sold off not long after the show concluded.

I used to say with the similarly long-rumored "Arrested Development" reunion that I would believe it when it was actually on my television. Well, that happened (and may happen again), and we're getting new installments of "Twin Peaks" and "X-Files" in the next couple of years. I don't want to be Charlie Brown with Lucy and the football here, but atmospheric conditions feel as right as they've ever been for such a thing to happen.

What does everybody else think? Do you want to believe Dillahunt, or has your heart been broken too many times? And do you think Milch and company could make the magic happen again a decade later?

UPDATE: Here's a comment from HBO: "In reference to Garret Dillahunt’s tweet regarding the rumored 'Deadwood' movie, there have only been very preliminary conversations."

So they're saying there's a chance!

Alan Sepinwall has been reviewing television since the mid-'90s, first for Tony Soprano's hometown paper, The Star-Ledger, and now for HitFix. His new book, "TV (The Book)" about the 100 greatest shows of all time, is available now. He can be reached at