StreamFix fills you in on the essential viewing options on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, and Crackle. Here's what the web is serving up for your binge-viewing needs. We begin with a Netflix cornucopia of Woody Allen offerings.




Woody Allen goes dark and deep in this Bergmanesque family drama from '78. Geraldine Page plays an interior designer who is basically the most depressed single figure you will ever see on the silver screen. Think about being an interior designer in '78; you can only choose beige or gray wall coverings. You understand her dourness. Diane Keaton and Mary Beth Hurt play her grim daughters, and Maureen Stapleton rules in a small role.


Never forget that Meryl Streep once seemed destined to play icy roles forever. In "Manhattan" she plays a lesbian who used to be in a relationship with Woody Allen. She is bitter and bad-ass here, so be sure to catch that. Diane Keaton is also phenomenal, and Mariel Hemingway is pouty and seventeen. Ugh. Woody.

"Love and Death"

This on-the-nose, often pretentious movie still has a lot of huge laughs. It's a parody of Russian literature featuring Allen as Boris and Diane Keaton as Sonja; the mock-philosophical debating is classic Woody Allen.

"Radio Days"

Quaint! It's just quaint. Allen weaves a bunch of stories together from the '30s, and nearly all your favorite Allen collaborators make an appearance. Mia Farrow, Jeff Daniels, Dianne Wiest, and even a split second of Diane Keaton end up in the Golden Age of radio. 




Did you catch our interview with the new Penguin, Mr. Robin Lord Taylor? Think we can agree he is perfectly creepy and lovably weird on "Gotham." He also looks charming in a navy blue dress shirt and skinny tie. Nice to have debonair villains back in our lives. 

"Marry Me"

We can't give Casey Wilson enough work. We wronged her by canceling "Happy Endings" and we only half-recouped by throwing "The Hotwives of Orlando" at her. Now we can propel her to further fame with "Marry Me," a new NBC comedy starring Wilson and Ken Marino. I think it is illegal to say the name "Ken Marino" without screaming for "Party Down" to come back. Let me check. Yes, I'm right.

It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (October 16)

Linus is all ready to hide in the pumpkin patch with his sweet baboo Sally for another run-in with the Great Pumpkin. Maybe this year it won't be Snoopy in the end? Ugh. Linus, you're insane. (Charlie Brown's trick-or-treating adventures are also part of the fun.)


Amazon Prime


I thought this pilot was perfectly delightful. Cristela Alonzo plays the titular dame, a Mexican-American law school graduate whose parents have their own ideas about her future. 

"The Walking Dead"

Sure seemed like the vote on the season five premiere of "The Walking Dead" was unanimous: a solid start. The appearance of those unbelievable flaming zombies helped.

"Jane the Virgin"

It seems weird that we don't adapt more Venezuelan telenovelas for American audiences. How can we go wrong? Gina Rodriguez plays a religious Latin woman who becomes artificially inseminated by mistake in this new romp. 




The second half of season one is released today, and that's a wonderful relief: We'd spent six weeks with the first half of the season starring Patrick Warburton and Summer Glau in a courtroom drama that manages to stay out of the courtroom. This is show is thrilling and succinct; every episode is 22 minutes long. Lap it up. 

Join us next Tuesday for more of the best streams on the web at StreamFix.