"Annie Hall"

"Annie Hall" is a definitive comic gem from 1977, a watershed romantic comedy that gave great roles to Diane Keaton, Carol Kane, and even Paul Simon. And you better not bring it up around me, because I will be livid. Can't you talk about "Manhattan Murder Mystery" or something? You realize Anjelica Huston plays a poker expert in that, right?

"Harold and Maude"

Damn, I love Ruth Gordon. One of the top five Oscar speeches of all time, for sure. Bud Cort? What a wonderful performance he gives. What a strange, enigmatic, weird, funnyish movie. Sigh. Too bad if you bring it up one more time like it makes you a sensitive, deep man who can appreciate peculiar whimsicality, I'm going to tie up and torture your improv instructor. 

"Breakfast at Tiffany's"

Unless you're voicing a conspiracy theory that Harper Lee wrote all of Truman Capote's best work, don't start with this one. 

"Taxi Driver"

A bracing, unsettling masterpiece that makes me want to choke you when you bring it up. Incorporate Cybill Shepherd into your opening arguments or move along to heralding "The King of Comedy."


Don't do this to me.

"Wet Hot American Summer"

Get out, you think this movie is funny and silly and kind of naughty too? And you're looking forward to the limited series on Netflix? Aren't we a pair.

"Ferris Bueller's Day Off"

If you're talking about "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and not explicitly arguing that Jeanie is the sole baller in the entire picture, let's end this now.

"Blue Velvet"

Good for you.

"Sleepless in Seattle"

I don't know. Do we really need to revisit "Sleepless in Seattle" when we also have movies like "Moonstruck" around? "Moonstruck" is still light years ahead of every other romcom. It's also on Netflix. Let's just talk about "Moonstruck"! I always have something to say about "Moonstruck." Vincent Gardenia, anyone? Killing it. 

"Mean Girls"

If you still quote "Mean Girls," you're the Gretchen of your group.