So just who is John Harrison?

It's a question that's been bandied about quite a bit since the semi-reveal of Benedict Cumberbatch's mysterious "Star Trek Into Darkness" villain several months ago, but - typical for a J.J. Abrams production - details on the character are still mighty hard to come by. And Damon Lindelof isn't about to offer any up.

"All I can say is John Harrison is a very, very intelligent, brilliant guy,"  said the screenwriter on the red carpet at CinemaCon on Tuesday, where the sequel was previewed for exhibitors. "He knows how Starfleet works, because he comes from inside Starfleet. But I'm not really at liberty to divulge anymore or else J.J. will appear out of thin air and strangle me."

Luckily, Lindelof was far more forthcoming on the subject of the film's expanded scope, both narratively and visually - the latter partially thanks to Abrams' use of IMAX and 3D, which were not utilized in the first installment.

"To be honest with you, we all were kinda cynical about [using 3D]," he said. "It just felt like, 'Oh god, enough with the 3D.' But then we did some test footage from the first movie, and we talked to our stereographer, which is the guy who does the 3D, and just the immaculate attention that they've paid to it, I really do feel like the experience of this movie is gonna be completely and totally immersive. I love the first movie, but it's just...it feels much bigger, much broader, much more action-packed than the first one."

Also stopping by for a chat at the Las Vegas convention were co-stars John Cho (Sulu) and Alice Eve, the latter a newbie to the franchise who plays the role of Dr. Carol Marcus.

"Not only is the franchise established and respected, [but] I was a fan, my grandfather was a fan...so that's a big thing for me," Eve said of joining the series. "And then to work with J.J. Abrams, who is a mind to be reckoned with. Just to be around that sort of mind is always an honor."

For his part, Cho took a moment to comment on the sequel's higher stakes, which apparently take on a more metaphysical dimension than they did in the previous film.

"To me it feels like the moral stakes are a little deeper, it feels like not only bodies but maybe souls are at risk," said Cho. "It feels a little weightier in that respect...spiritually, I'd say."

To check out the full interviews, you can click on the videos above and below.

"Star Trek Into Darkness" hits theaters on May 17. Watch the latest trailer here.

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