Greta Gerwig and Ellen Page together in one interview is a whole lot of smart and attractive to deal with at one time, and it almost didn't happen.

When there are multiple press days happening at the same time, studios frequently coordinate so that they can be in the same location and they can work out schedules, knowing that reporters are juggling several obligations at the same time.  Last week, I had a bit of juggling of my own to do, since I was covering Oliver Stone's new film "Savages," and then I was also set to talk to some of the cast from "To Rome With Love," but in a different location.

The Four Seasons, which is frequently the location of these press days, was positively swamped that afternoon, and in addition to "Savages" and several other press days, they were dealing with a wedding and some other events, and it was positively insane.  When I wrapped up the "Savages" interviews, I ran to get my car so I could drive the six minutes to the second hotel, the Beverly Wilshire, where the "To Rome With Love" team was entrenched.  I was cutting things close, but I figured I could make it.

Then it took the valets 45 minutes to get my car.

By the time I actually made it to the Beverly Wilshire, I was about a half-hour later than I was scheduled to arrive, and I ran up the stairs to where they were set up for the interviews.  I was told that they had just wrapped for the day and that they were already striking the interview rooms, and I braced myself for having to report back to Team HitFix that I had missed the interviews completely.  Thankfully, the Sony Pictures Classics team took pity on me, and they managed to talk the talent that was still there into doing one more interview.

When I actually sat down opposite Greta Gerwig and Ellen Page, I was totally flustered, and it's hard to just switch into "interview mode" when I was just dealing with all the frustration of the afternoon.  Thankfully, the moment you start talking to Greta Gerwig and Ellen Page, all the rest of it just drops away.  They're both so engaging and sharp and funny, and discussing an experience working with Woody Allen is one of those things that brings the best out of any actor.

I thought it was interesting that they were both quick to point out that my interpretation of the story they're part of in the film is not necessarily the right one.  I think the film is pretty clear about what's happening, but hearing their reaction suggests that Allen thought it was more ambiguous.  If you've seen the film, I'd be curious to see which side of it you fall on.  Whatever the case, this was a charming way to spend a few minutes at the end of a day, and if you ever find yourself frustrated and annoyed, I highly recommend a conversation with Greta Gerwig and Ellen Page to sort things out.

"To Rome With Love" opened today in limited release.