One of the things that defines the men of "Rush" is the way they relate to the women in their lives.

Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) is reluctant to open his life to Marlene (Alexandra Maria Lara), but once he does, it's obvious that she is important to him, and she changes the way he thinks about life and death for the first time. James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth), on the other hand, may love the idea of being married to Suzy Miller (Olivia Wilde), a famous model who looks great on his arm, but he isn't wired to put anyone else's wants or needs before his own.

When I sat down with Wilde in Toronto to talk about the film, she was excited to discuss how she researched Miller, who wasn't really much of a public figure. It was a different time, and people were actually able to have private lives even if they worked in a field like modeling. It made it hard for her to track down much material about Miller, but she was able to at least tap into the way it would feel to be married to someone who risked their life every time they went out the door.

Ultimately, that's the main thing "Rush" seems interested in, that drive in both men and what it is that would make someone do what they did. As different as Lauda and Hunt are in the film, they are both addicted to the adrenaline that comes from doing something that could kill them, and Wilde talked about why that might be so attractive to someone.

Peter Morgan's script for "Rush" is one of my favorites that he's written, and Ron Howard seems to have been inspired by it to deliver one of his strongest films so far. If you haven't already seen it, definitely check it out. It's one of the best things in theaters right now.