<p>Rose Byrne and Seth&nbsp;Rogen go to war against a frat when they end up living next door to it in what they thought was their dream house in Universal's new comedy 'Neighbors'</p>

Rose Byrne and Seth Rogen go to war against a frat when they end up living next door to it in what they thought was their dream house in Universal's new comedy 'Neighbors'

Credit: Universal Pictures

Producer Evan Goldberg on wrangling the comic mayhem of 'Neighbors'

Plus we discuss 'Goon,' Rose Byrne, and the evolution of his films with Seth Rogen

Evan Goldberg may not have the instant name recognition of his creative partner Seth Rogen, but he is every bit as responsible for "Superbad," "Pineapple Express," and "This Is The End," and like Rogen, he is now able to help shepherd younger comic talent through the studio system as a producer.

The two of them are playing that role for the new movie "Neighbors," which stars Rogen and Rose Byrne as a young married couple who spend their life savings buying what they hope is going to be a dream house, a place to raise their newborn child. Instead, they find themselves locked in a sort of comic "Straw Dogs" scenario when a fraternity buys the house next door and proceeds to terrorize Rogen and Byrne with sex and drugs and rock and roll.

On the day I visited the set, I watched Dave Franco, Zac Efron, Seth Rogen, and Rose Byrne all play a scene where the frat guys stop by to announce a Robert De Niro party they're holding. It was a preposterous moment, and director Nicholas Stoller, who I've visited on three films prior to this, was in a gregarious mood, laughing and enjoying each new take.

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<p>Will Loki set off a major war across the Nine Realms in 'Thor 3'?&nbsp;Craig Kyle and Christopher Yost are the ones with the plan.</p>

Will Loki set off a major war across the Nine Realms in 'Thor 3'? Craig Kyle and Christopher Yost are the ones with the plan.

Credit: Marvel Studios

Marvel Studios hands 'Thor 3' to one of their execs-turned-screenwriter

The franchise is in good hands, so where is it headed?

When I was on the set of the original "Thor," the person who spent the day showing the press around was Craig Kyle. At the time, he was one of the junior guys with the company, but it was obvious that, like most of the guys at Marvel, he had one character who was more near and dear to his heart than any of the others, and for him, that character was Thor.

As a result, I'm pleased to see that Craig Kyle's been hired to co-write the third "Thor" film with Christopher Yost.

He was the senior vice-president of Production and Development for Marvel when this decision was made, and he'll obviously leave that job to become the writer of the film. Yost, his co-writer, was one of the guys who shared screenplay credit on "Thor: The Dark World," along with Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely and Don Payne and Robert Rodat. There are some big story threads that have been left dangling at the end of "Thor: The Dark World," including Loki's final trick, and I would assume the third "Thor" will deal with those elements as well as whatever story threads are set up in "Avengers: Age Of Ultron."

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<p>'I see dead careers'</p>

'I see dead careers'

Credit: Hollywood Pictures

Why 'Labor Of Love' will be the most important film in M. Night Shyamalan's career

And, no, it's not just because he's working with Bruce Willis again

"Citizen Kane" holds such a monumental place in our popular culture that whether or not you've seen the film, you most likely know the film's "big secret," since like "Psycho" and "Planet Of The Apes" and "The Empire Strikes Back," the film practically embodies the idea of a film built on a twist or a surprise or a reveal, and those things have been parodied and re-stated and borrowed from endlessly by now.

In the case of "Kane," the entire film is built around a search for meaning in the final words of a dying mogul, and it is only in the film's closing moments that the meaning of the cryptic word "Rosebud" is revealed. It all goes back to a pivotal moment in childhood, a lost sled that he misses still. So many people are defined by a few particular moments along the way, and one of the biggest questions in life is whether we would be different people if a few key things that happened a different way at key turning points in our lives. It's easy to pinpoint those moments in a movie, but for someone's real life, it can be far more difficult. However, in the case of M. Night Shyamalan, I think there is a pivotal moment that pushed him in the direction he's been heading for most of his career, and in a surprise twist, it looks like he's about to get a chance to go back and try again.

For Shyamalan, everything changed when "The Sixth Sense" was released and he was a sudden overnight sensation. For most people, that was their introduction to his work, and when he ended up on the cover of Newsweek, where they declared him "The New Spielberg?", it helped cement the narrative that he had come out of nowhere, fully formed and awesome.

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<p>Russell Crowe's going to try to save his family from the flood when Darren Aronofsky opens the floodgates in 'Noah'</p>

Russell Crowe's going to try to save his family from the flood when Darren Aronofsky opens the floodgates in 'Noah'

Credit: Paramount Pictures

The Super Bowl ad for Darren Aronofsky's 'Noah' goes heavy on the spectacle

No one can blame Paramount for not trying on this one

Every studio must sit down near the start of the year to discuss which films they think would be an appropriate fit for them to cut a special commercial to air during the Super Bowl.

There are some movies that seem like perfect fits, and it seems like any movie that is a visual spectacle is a good fit. If you've got a trailer that ends with massive eye-popping special effects, then you want that conversation that's going to result from you showing off some of that eye candy.

Even so, I'd love to have heard the conversations that went on before Paramount decided to advertise "Noah" during the game on Sunday. Internally, Paramount's been wrestling with how to sell this movie, and it's hard to blame them. Aronofsky's script is earnest and unusual and filled with some strange digressions that will throw people who expect a standard-issue Bible movie, and while there is a huge audience out there ready to support Christian-themed movies, they might not know what to make of his vision for this story.

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<p>Sean Penn, Don Harvey, and Michael J. Fox all threw down when they went head to head in Brian De Palma's largely overlooked 'Casualties Of War'</p>

Sean Penn, Don Harvey, and Michael J. Fox all threw down when they went head to head in Brian De Palma's largely overlooked 'Casualties Of War'

Credit: SPHE

Movie Rehab: Fox vs. Penn in Brian De Palma's overlooked 'Casualties Of War'

This one got lost in the tidal wave of Vietnam films in the late '80s

It is the responsibility of the working film critic to not only offer opinion and context for the newest releases, but also to constantly champion and curate the films that matter, especially if they were misunderstood or poorly released or somehow handled badly the first time around.

Critics should take it upon themselves to rehabilitate the under-loved, to defend the wrongly-maligned, and rehab the films that need it; it is the only way film as a whole can be healthy.

Brian De Palma has had exactly two moments in his career when everything broke his way, commercially and artistically.

The first was early on, and "Carrie" was lightning in a bottle. It was a best-selling book that was written in this fevered language, as much a matter of the author's immaturity as the actual urgency of the story, but it launched Stephen King's career, deservedly, and the film version managed to tap into that same sense of momentum. De Palma turned out to be the perfect guy to give voice to that films mix of woozy revenge fantasy and bottomless angst.

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<p>Yayan Ruhian's nothing like his on-screen persona, and Arifin Putra seems ready for Hollywood movie stardom as we discuss their new film 'The Raid 2'</p>

Yayan Ruhian's nothing like his on-screen persona, and Arifin Putra seems ready for Hollywood movie stardom as we discuss their new film 'The Raid 2'

Credit: HitFix

Fight coordinator Yayan Ruhian and bad guy Arifin Putra on preparing for 'The Raid 2'

Our final interview with the team behind the amazing new action film

PARK CITY - One of the highlights of "The Raid" was the character named Mad Dog. When you name a character something like that, especially in a film that is structured as a series of escalating fights, then you'd better deliver when you finally get to the scene where this guy shows what he can do.

Since Gareth Evans had Yayan Ruhian playing the part, he was unworried, and with good reason. Ruhian is not only a gifted physical performer, but he's also a Silat instructor, and he's been one of the fight coordinators for all three movies Evans has directed using the martial art. Ruhian runs a studio of his own in Indonesia, and he specializes in a mental discipline that allows him to absorb blows to his person.

He's very good in "The Raid 2," even though he really only has three scenes in the movie. The first establishes who he is, the second challenges our idea of what he is, and then in the third, he realizes that he is being set up for a very specific purpose. In two of the three scenes, we get some sense of just how intimidating and powerful he is as a fighter, and in the third, we get an idea of how far he's come as an actor. In person, he seems lovely, very soft-spoken and modest.

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<p>That is a seriously cool riff on Cap's costume for 'Captain America:&nbsp;The Winter Soldier'</p>

That is a seriously cool riff on Cap's costume for 'Captain America: The Winter Soldier'

Credit: Marvel Studios

Joe and Anthony Russo already in talks with Marvel to direct 'Captain America 3'

I guess this means we can start getting excited for April, right?

There seems to be a good deal of excitement right now about "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," due in large part to the news that Marvel has already signed Anthony and Joe Russo for a third film in the series.

While I'm not sure I agree with the champagne-pouring exaltations on Twitter that seem to believe this proves "The Winter Soldier" is the greatest movie ever made, I do think it's a vote of confidence that Marvel feels like they made the movie they set out to make. Until something is finished, you don't really know if it works, if it feels like a "movie" all the way through. I've seen things at various points in the process that looked good but that just didn't add up when they were all put together, and that's one of the most important things I feel like I've learned.

If Marvel and the Russos are already working on a storyline for the third film, I'm excited. I'm sure the Russos know everything that happens during "Age Of Ultron" and that they're picking up from the new status quo that exists at the end of that film. They're essentially making a sequel to both "Winter Soldier" and "Age Of Ultron," one of those quirks of working in the Marvel system right now.

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<p>Jennifer Lawrence once again makes a striking Mystique.</p>

Jennifer Lawrence once again makes a striking Mystique.

25 character covers from 'X-Men: Days Of Future Past' debut to mixed reaction

Is this overkill or a great way to pull an audience in?

As Empire magazine celebrates their 25th anniversary, they are planning all sorts of 25-themed events, and the first of them was today's unveiling of 25 different covers that all have to do with "X-Men: Days Of Future Past."

The reaction to the covers online has not been a good one, and I was shocked when I saw the steady stream of vitriol about each new image. Some of these designs are things we've known already from earlier films, and some of them just seem inevitable. I can see why the Quicksilver image has been controversial, and I'm still amazed by how hard it is for them to make Storm look like Storm, but overall, I think this is pretty much what I'd expect from a Bryan Singer "X-Men" movie.

The real question at this point is whether or not that's what audiences want. It's a risky proposition for Singer as a filmmaker. After all, when he left the series, it wasn't completely voluntary, and he's been able to portray himself as the wounded party this whole time. It was a shabby situation all the way around, with Singer using the possibility of a "Superman" movie to pressure Fox to do things his way on "X-Men 3," and with Fox playing hardball because they were determined to maintain control of the franchise.

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<p>Iko Uwais and Julie Estelle seem like sweet kids who could also kick your spine out of your body.</p>

Iko Uwais and Julie Estelle seem like sweet kids who could also kick your spine out of your body.

Credit: HitFix

Iko Uwais and Julie 'Hammer Girl' Estelle on how they survived 'The Raid 2'

They seem like such sweet and completely lethal kids

PARK CITY - One of the craziest moments in the Keanu Reeves film "Man Of Tai Chi" comes near the conclusion when Tiger Hu Chen finally has to face his competition in the finals of the weird underground martial arts tournament he's been working his way through, and it turns out to be Iko Uwais from "The Raid" and "The Raid 2." When they enter the ring, I readied myself for the fight of all fights, and there's something perverse about the way Reeves has Tiger Hu Chen simply refuse the fight. That would be like having your hero battle his way into a room where Bruce Lee was, then having Bruce Lee shake his hand and walk away.

Iko Uwais does not look like an action icon at first glance. He's slight, with a boyish face, and he doesn't seem particularly imposing in terms of how he's built. The moment you see him explode into action, though, it's apparent that he's a natural, both graceful and powerful. He's also becoming a better actor from film to film. In "Merantau," he seems comfortable in the fight scenes but not nearly as comfortable with dialogue. By now, though, he's gotten very good, and there are several scenes in "The Raid 2" that are emotionally powerful and very simple, with no fighting at all involved.

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<p>If even Patrick Stewart can't pull the sword from the stone, that is one seriously stuck sword</p>

If even Patrick Stewart can't pull the sword from the stone, that is one seriously stuck sword

Credit: Warner Bros

Guy Ritchie reunites with 'Holmes' producer for a six-film 'King Arthur' franchise

Warner Bros. seems determined to figure this one out

Am I the only one who remembers the Jerry Bruckheimer "King Arthur"?

Warner Bros. is definitely hoping to find something that will stand in for "Harry Potter," something that gives them a long-term recurring franchise, something that gets viewers hooked early and that keeps them on the hook for a decade or so. This is, of course, the model that every studio is chasing at the moment, but it must be frustrating for Warner Bros. because they had one of the biggest of all time, and they managed it just right.

Part of that, of course, was thanks to the involvement of Lionel Wigram, who was also the producer who brought them their "Sherlock Holmes" movies with Guy Ritchie directing Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law. While they did get a second movie out of that series, it doesn't seem like there's any real urgency to making another one.

Now there's word that Guy Ritchie may be onboard to direct a tentpole fantasy film that is designed to kick off a six-movie retelling of the King Arthur legend with a script by Joby Harold.

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