<p>This is my new planned mode of transportation to pretty much everywhere. I didn't have kids for nothing.</p>

This is my new planned mode of transportation to pretty much everywhere. I didn't have kids for nothing.

Credit: Paramount Pictures

New red-band trailer for 'Bad Grandpa' gives away some of the best stuff

At this point, don't you know already if you're seeing the film?

If you have not see Paramount's upcoming "Bad Grandpa," and you're interested it in seeing it, then might I recommend that you not watch the new red-band trailer for the film?

Here's my thinking: part of the thrill of seeing the film, as with every film in the "Jackass" series, comes from the surprise of how the gags unfold. Some of the set-ups are obvious, but what really makes the film work is seeing how the jokes play out and seeing how they play variations on the gag.

Running this sort of red-band R-rated trailer gives you a good idea of just how far the film is willing to go for a joke. The vending machine joke that opens the trailer is far more visually upsetting than this lets on, and there's a sequence they show a bit of that comes later in the film that is absolutely insane.

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<p>He may, in fact, be back.</p>

He may, in fact, be back.

Credit: Warner Bros.

Will Tim Burton and Michael Keaton finally get 'Beetlejuice 2' into theaters?

Is it time for the Ghost with the Most to return from the grave?

I think I've been fairly vocal about my issues with the ongoing creative collaboration between Johnny Depp and Tim Burton. Sure, my favorite film of Burton's career stars Depp, but they've settled into a overly familiar rhythm to things, and it feels like the law of diminishing returns has kicked on.

On the other hand, the idea of Tim Burton making a new movie with Michael Keaton starring is exciting on many levels, and might honestly be some of my favorite news of the year. While I have many issues with the 1989 "Batman," I think overall, these two guys had a great rapport and they each push the other's sensibilities in important ways. I don't think Keaton is Burton's lost soul mate the way Depp seems to be, and that's a good thing. Keaton has a fast and strange comedy brain, and he made "Beetlejuice" feel dangerous in ways that Burton couldn't have pulled off with someone else in the role.

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<p>I hope they keep doing it until they are 140 years old.</p>

I hope they keep doing it until they are 140 years old.

Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

All it takes to win 'Before Midnight' on Blu-ray is a Twitter account

And we'll even throw in the excellent soundtrack as well

There's no way I tip my hand about what film places where on my end of the year list, especially not as early as October, but it would have to be a spectacular, defining year of cinema for me not to find a place for "Before Midnight" somewhere on that list.

Richard Linklater's series about Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) is thrilling to me on several levels. First, I can't believe the films even exist. The first movie is such a smart, sweet, self-contained gem that it would have been very easy for everyone involved to decide that any sequel they attempted would ruin things. "Before Sunrise" is very slight, at least on the surface, and not the sort of thing that Hollywood falls all over itself to turn into a franchise. "Before Sunset" was amazing to me because it managed to beautifully update the first film without being an imitation of it. And now, with this latest film, Linklater, Hawke and Delpy all seem to be determined to capture these characters' lives in a constantly evolving and beautiful series of films that feel completely real.

One thing that really stands out this time is the way Linklater and cinematographer Christos Voudouris capture Greece as a location, and the best way for you to enjoy that work at home would be on the upcoming Blu-ray.

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<p>Kenny Powers tries to lull Yul Brenner, his dancing robot, because 'Eastbound &amp;&nbsp;Down' is ridiculously awesome.</p>

Kenny Powers tries to lull Yul Brenner, his dancing robot, because 'Eastbound & Down' is ridiculously awesome.

Credit: HBO

Review: Kenny Powers struggles to see who is alpha on this week's 'Eastbound & Down'

As the season picks up steam, it looks like real conflict is brewing

One of the things I want to emphasize about this year's "Eastbound & Down" episodes is how thematically strong the writing's been. This week's rumination on the idea of how to be an alpha is a great standalone piece of work, regardless of where it fits into the larger arc of Kenny Powers. Written by Jody Hill & Danny McBride & Justin Nowell, there's so much meat to what they did this week that it's hard to believe they packed it all into a mere 28 minutes.

Who is the alpha this season? Guy Young (Ken Marino) has stepped up to play a huge role in the life of Kenny Powers (Danny McBride), basically plucking him out of a life that was threatening to destroy Kenny completely and giving him not one but two chances to prove himself. Kenny knows full well how much he owes Guy, and yet he seems determined to cast their relationship as a friendship because that way they are equals. Kenny isn't built to be someone else's sidekick. Stevie (Steve Little) is about as far from being the alpha even in his own house as he can be, and it's obviously impacting him. Watching how Guy Young handles anyone at work who shows him up in any way, it's obvious that he doubts his own status as alpha, and he'll destroy anybody who threatens to change that perception. Within his neighborhood's cloistered social circle, it's obvious that Kenny sees himself as alpha, but he's worried that Gene (Tim Heidecker) might somehow take that from him. And even Kenny's son Toby (Steele Gagnon, so good in last year's "Looper") is having to grapple with his own place in the food chain thanks to Kenny's purchase of a wolf named Dakota.

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<p>Robert Redford's rarely given performances as rich and committed as the work he does in 'All Is Lost'</p>

Robert Redford's rarely given performances as rich and committed as the work he does in 'All Is Lost'

Credit: Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions

Review: J.C. Chandor's 'All Is Lost' catches wind with a great Redford performance

HitFix
A-
Readers
n/a
Another 'one person alone in danger' film takes its own approach

How many of you have been shipwrecked?

My father missed his era. He was born to be a cowboy. He would have had a tremendous life riding the range, working the land for a living, his rifle and his six-gun doing the talking when need be. I think he would have been happy. Like many people, he has experimented with hobbies and passions over the years, and when I was young and my family lived in Florida, there was a time when boating was given some time and attention.

It did not end well.

I can't say for sure how many boats my dad sank. It's somewhere between two and fifty. What I know for sure is that when one of your formative memories as a child is being rescued by the Coast Guard after you spent the night on an island because your boat sank, it teaches you a healthy respect for the idea that the ocean, when it wants to, will kick your ass.

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<p>I&nbsp;really feel like this whole goth thing has gotten out of control.</p>

I really feel like this whole goth thing has gotten out of control.

Credit: Screen Gems

Review: Kim Peirce's new 'Carrie' only captures some of the story's enduring power

HitFix
C
Readers
n/a
The story itself retains its power, but does the new version stand alone?

Brian De Palma wasn't just hired to direct the film version of Stephen King's monstrously successful first novel "Carrie"; he collided with it, and the result basically manhandled audiences, creating iconic imagery, loaded with indelible performances. "Carrie" is not a subtle film, but it is a fairly undeniable film. It is a fever dream, overheated and overwrought and impossible to shake. De Palma's film means it. There is nothing halfway about it, and it practically burns the edges of the screen. It runs hot from the moment it starts.

When they made a weak sequel to the film in the '90s and when they remade the movie for television, those were easy to tune out. I think the world of Angela Bettis, and she seems like near-perfect casting for the role of Carrie White, but I didn't even bother to see that film. I have no opinion of it beyond "I'm not sure why you'd bother."

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<p>I was a little surprised by the 17-minute explicit lovemaking scene that follows this moment in the film, but honestly, it feels like they've been building up to it their whole careers.</p>

I was a little surprised by the 17-minute explicit lovemaking scene that follows this moment in the film, but honestly, it feels like they've been building up to it their whole careers.

Credit: Summit Entertainment

Review: Schwarzenegger and Stallone team up for so-so 'Escape Plan'

HitFix
C+
Readers
B
Someone lit a fire under Arnold, though

Midway through "Escape Plan," the agreeably cheesy new thriller that stars both Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone, I found myself cackling as I imagined Arnold sitting in his agent's office, asking them to find him a project where he could do a whooooooooole lot of acting.

"I know you've found me a few starring roles since I made my comeback, and I did that 'Expendables' gig, but what I really want is a role where I get to do a lot of voices and improv comedy and I'm a mastermind who is constantly playing characters. Like I said. Lots and lots of acting."

I'm not sure I'd necessarily call all of that acting good, but it sure is fun to watch Arnold throw this much effort at anything. I'm not sure I believed he still had it in him, but he looks like he's having a blast here as Rottmayer, a convict who is locked away in The Tomb, the highest of high security prisons. He doesn't show up until about a third of the way into the film, but once he does, he can barely stop smiling.

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<p>Kimberly Peirce seemed excited to be able to talk about her new adaptation of Stephen King's 'Carrie'</p>

Kimberly Peirce seemed excited to be able to talk about her new adaptation of Stephen King's 'Carrie'

Credit: HitFix

Kimberly Peirce on why Moretz and Moore were perfect for 'Carrie'

The 'Boys Don't Cry' filmmaker talks about working with her latest lead

It almost seems too easy a choice to hire Kimberly Peirce to make a new version of Stephen King's "Carrie." After all, her film "Boys Don't Cry" is an excellent look at how an outsider desperately tries to fit into a high school world, and the film positively vibrates with genuine pain.

Her second film "Stop Loss" is less successful overall but it still has a palpable sense of what it feels like to not quite fit. The unease in her work makes her a preposterously on-the-nose choice for "Carrie," and I don't mean that as any sort of insult. It's just one of those things where as soon as you hear the choice, it's an automatic "duh."

Sitting down to talk to her, I didn't want to talk about it as a horror film. I know this is the story that launched King's career as the master of modern written horror, but "Carrie" has always struck me as a tragedy, and it seems like Peirce saw this as a very human story, driven by very human problems.

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<p>Jessie The Cowgirl (Joan Cusack) teams up with Combat Carl (Carl Weathers) in Pixar's new 'Toy Story Of Terror'</p>

Jessie The Cowgirl (Joan Cusack) teams up with Combat Carl (Carl Weathers) in Pixar's new 'Toy Story Of Terror'

Credit: Pixar/ABC

Review: Pixar's 'Toy Story Of Terror' is a smart and funny addition to the series

HitFix
B+
Readers
B+
It's a short story, but focused and beautifully built

From the opening shot of the wallpaper with the familiar white-clouds-on-blue-sky motif to the exactly-right-genre-parody storytelling in the opening sequence to the way the story builds to a tremendously well-plotted payoff for both story and character, "Toy Story Of Terror" is a "Toy Story" story in every way, and should delight Pixar fans perennially now.

I love that this is now the Bonnie continuity, and I love the detail of watching TV in the car during a rainy drive. Awesome modern detail. Jessie is claustrophobic. That makes perfect sense after what we know from "Toy Story 2," but handled well here. It's easy to forget that she was completely and utterly insane in that film, mentally broken in a very scary way. Joan's work in the special is very, very good, and I always love the moments where things go very subtle.

The way the story unfolds and the way the toys talk about horror convention is fun and simple and makes sure that things don't get too scary for kids. Pricklepants gets to make an impression here since he's the one who knows how things are supposed to work. Timothy Dalton has never met a plate full of ham that he has not gleefully devoured, and I love him for it. He seems to relish the absurdity of playing a character named Pricklepants who speaks in such positively Shakespearean diction.

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<p>I have no idea what Paramount is worried about.</p>

I have no idea what Paramount is worried about.

Credit: Universal Pictures

Reports have Aronofsky and Paramount battling over Russell Crowe's 'Noah'

Whose vision will the final film ultimately represent?

Why would you hire Darren Aronofsky to make a Darren Aronofsky film unless you were ready to have the full Darren Aronofsky experience?

During a recent appearance on the podcast "How Did This Get Made?", I talked about how often we see long-time dream projects finally get realized on film only to turn out to be terrible. I'm not saying that will be the case with "Noah," but any studio that signs on to a film like that has to understand this isn't some mere case of work for hire. This is something that a filmmaker has lived with for decades now, and there are things he's going to have to do, test audiences be damned. When you agree to make a film like that, you have to assume it's going to be a wild ride, and when we hear reports of struggles in this situation, it baffles me because it seems like everyone involved should have seen that coming.

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