<p>Seth Rogen and Zac Efron were in fine spirits the morning after &#39;Neighbors&#39; had its SXSW premiere.</p>

Seth Rogen and Zac Efron were in fine spirits the morning after 'Neighbors' had its SXSW premiere.

Credit: HitFix

Zac Efron and Seth Rogen on torturing each other for the new comedy 'Neighbors'

Efron talks about jumping into the improv pool with the ensemble cast

"Funny Or Die" took over a bar in Austin for the entire duration of SXSW, and the morning after "Neighbors" was screened in a work-in-progress format, I headed over to that converted house to talk to the cast and the crew of the film.

The first conversation of the morning was with Seth Rogen and Zac Efron together, and it is the tension between the two of them that drives the entire movie. While this feels like a comfortable fit for Rogen, it is all-new territory for Efron. He's done comedy before, most notably with "17 Again," but he's never made this sort of comedy before. This is like comedy as a full-contact sport, and when you're in a movie with Rogen, Rose Byrne, Ike Barinholtz, and you've got Nicholas Stoller directing and Rogen co-producing with Evan Goldberg, you've got a ton of people on that set who are among the best in the business at this particular type of filmmaking.

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<p>30 years after the events of &#39;Return Of The Jedi,&#39; the characters we know and love will return for &#39;Star Wars Episode VII&#39;</p>

30 years after the events of 'Return Of The Jedi,' the characters we know and love will return for 'Star Wars Episode VII'

Credit: 20th Century Fox/Lucasfilm Ltd.

'Star Wars' jumps 30 years into the future for 'Episode VII'

It's amazing how little we know about this one so far

Here's how little we know about "Star Wars: Episode VII" so far: the news that the new film will take place 30 years after the conclusion of "Return Of The Jedi" is being treated like an amazing announcement.

Don't get me wrong… I'm interested to see how the world of "Star Wars" has changed after 30 years. It's nice to see them allow for the same amount of time to have passed in the movies as has passed in real life, so they don't have to pretend that Carrie Fisher, Mark Hamill, and Harrison Ford are younger than they are, and it gives enough time for things to have changed in some significant way.

Even so, the film starts shooting in May, and we still basically know nothing about the story or even the casting. Sure, we've heard plenty of rumors, and in some cases, the people posting those rumors have been adamant that will will indeed see Adam Driver playing a bad guy and Lupita N'Yongo playing a major role and that we'll likely see Jesse Plemons or John Boyega playing a key role as well. It is taken as common knowledge at this point that there will be returning appearances by Hamill, Ford, and Fisher, and that the Millennium Falcon is already standing on a soundstage in London. Is all of that true? I think so, but because nothing is official yet, I wouldn't just run that as fact. Not yet.

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<p>Seriously, don&#39;t mess with this family.</p>

Seriously, don't mess with this family.

Credit: Pixar

Disney makes it official: 'The Incredibles' is finally getting a sequel

Now we just need confirmation that Brad Bird is the man in charge

It is the day fans have been asking for since 2004, and for many years, it was a day that I was sure would never happen.

In the decade since the first film was released, Brad Bird has probably answered the question about whether or not there would be an "Incredibles" sequel a hundred times, and each time, he's been very blunt. The problem was always coming up with a story that was worth telling again with those characters. It would be easy to crank out a dozen movies where we just spend time with Bob, Helen, Dash, Violet, and the deeply freaky Jack Jack, and I'm sure audiences would have been happy to watch those films.

But Brad Bird is not a guy who had a lot of patience for business as usual. Before "The Iron Giant," I knew Brad primarily from his work on "Family Dog" and as a screenwriter, and I got to know him as a film fan because he was a regular at Dave's Video. Talking to him about the business twenty years ago, he already had a fairly healthy sense of disgust towards the calculated business side of things, and it was obvious that for him, story and character are everything. He wants to tell good stories. He wants to make things that connect with people on some real level. He is not the guy you go to if you want someone to churn out indifferent product to satisfy the stockholders.

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<p>How excited is Arnold Schwarzenegger about returning to play both &#39;Conan&#39; and &#39;The Terminator&#39; one more time? THIS MUCH EXCITED.</p>

How excited is Arnold Schwarzenegger about returning to play both 'Conan' and 'The Terminator' one more time? THIS MUCH EXCITED.

Credit: HitFix

Arnold Schwarzenegger on the honor of returning to both 'Conan' and 'The Terminator'

We discuss the inevitable part of this phase in his iconic career

There are some days when you end up seated for an interview for several minutes before things get started and you end up doing a little small talk ahead of time, which can be weird when it's a big star or someone who just doesn't like the process. But other times, you're hustled through without even a moment to catch your breath, and when it's Arnold Schwarzenegger in the room, they do not waste a single second.

We were there to discuss his new movie "Sabotage," co-written and directed by David Ayer, and it was an easy if brief conversation. Near the end of things, though, I had a question I wanted ask Arnold about 2015's "Terminator Genesis," or whatever it's going to be called, as well as the long-rumored "King Conan" that he's still talking about starring in for 2017.

While both of them are sequels to earlier films of his, I feel differently about the potential of each one. I can see why you'd want to narratively go back to "King Conan." The idea of a barbarian living to the age of 60 is mind-boggling anyway, simply because of the world in which he lives. To make it to that age, he would have to be legendarily violent, and revisiting him at the end of that life sounds like an opportunity to tell a totally different kind of story than was told in the John Milius film.

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<p>What&#39;s this? A YA movie without a love triangle? Call the cliche police immediately!</p>

What's this? A YA movie without a love triangle? Call the cliche police immediately!

Credit: Summit Entertainment

Review: 'Divergent' succeeds largely due to Shailene Woodley and Theo James

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Casting is incredibly important when you're trying to build a franchise

Somewhere between "The Hunger Games" and "Twilight" lies "Divergent," Neil Burger's adaptation of Veronica Roth's novel, and while I think there are some weird issues with the film, there are enough things it does right that I think it's a pretty safe bet we'll see Roth's entire series play out on film in the next few years.

At what point are we going to stop with the weird non-descriptive "Young Adult" label for these movies? What's wrong with the genre labels that already existed? "The Hunger Games" and "Divergent" strike me as similar in many ways, but "young adult" doesn't suggest anything about what you'll actually see in the film.  They're science-fiction films with young casts. They create alternate worlds or alternate histories, and they are more than willing to reach for the big metaphor.

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<p>Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse took some time to talk about fandom, cable versus broadcast, and &#39;The Strain&#39;</p>

Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse took some time to talk about fandom, cable versus broadcast, and 'The Strain'

Credit: HitFix

Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse on the enduring popularity of 'Lost'

Plus Cuse discusses his upcoming Guillermo Del Toro series 'The Strain'

Before last night's PaleyFest "Lost" panel began, there was a red carpet where we took our chances to try to talk to some of the people who showed up for the reunion.

I'm not great on the red carpet, and last night was a reminder of all the things that drive me crazy about the process. They put you in a space that isn't big enough for one person, let alone a reporter and a cameraman, and there's a horrifying feeding frenzy mentality that kicks in once the first person starts working their way down the line. Elbows get thrown, manners disappear, and people get aggressive about everything.

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<p>Ian Somerholder, Maggie Grace, and Josh Holloway were part of a &#39;Lost&#39; reunion sandwich at the Dolby Theater tonight.</p>

Ian Somerholder, Maggie Grace, and Josh Holloway were part of a 'Lost' reunion sandwich at the Dolby Theater tonight.

Credit: Michael Kovac for Paley Center for Media

14 things we learned from the 'Lost' PaleyFest Panel

Code words, stolen props, and the proper use of a mai tai

PaleyFest is underway, and while television is not my normal beat here at HitFix, there are exceptions. For example, I've been the one recapping "Marvel's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D." this season, and for the last two years it was on the air, I was also the one who was recapping "Lost."

In both cases, it makes sense because of other interests of mine. I'm fascinated by the Marvel movie universe, and not just as a fan, but also as an example of world-building in mainstream movies. With "Lost," I was a fan. Period. It was a show that hooked me with the pilot, and I watched every episode of the entire run either as it aired or within a few hours.

Sunday night's tenth-anniversary reunion of the cast and creators of "Lost" was, according to tonight's introduction, the single fastest sell-out that the festival has ever had, a testament to just how much of a hold the series still has on the ocean of fans that it earned over the years. It may have been controversial as it wrapped things up, but even the people who didn't like the ending still seem to be chewing on it, and in a world where so much of the media we digest is completely disposable, forgotten before the closing credits are even finished, "Lost" seems to be built to endure.

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<p>Just this much of the image is enough to give you an idea of the depths that are explored by Angus Sampson in &#39;The Mule&#39;</p>

Just this much of the image is enough to give you an idea of the depths that are explored by Angus Sampson in 'The Mule'

Credit: SXSW 2014

Review: Hugo Weaving has a blast in the horrifying and hilarious 'The Mule'

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Seven days without WHAT?

AUSTIN - In the two "Insidious" movies, Angus Sampson and Leigh Whannell play the two paranormal investigators who work with Lin Shaye, and I enjoyed how they almost felt like they were beamed in from another film with a more aggressive sense of absurdity. They had really fun chemistry together, and in the second film especially, they were a big part of what the films did well.

Last week, their new collaboration premiered as part of the SXSW Film Festival, and this time, the two of them are front and center. They co-wrote "The Mule," and they both play key roles in the film, with Sampson also serving as co-director with Tony Mahony. "The Mule" is dark and smart and deeply satisfying, a wicked little crime thriller with a grim sense of humor. Sampson's work in front of the camera is just as good as his work behind the camera, and I suspect "The Mule" is going to emerge as one of the films that audiences really love from this festival. It may be the most exciting surprise I've had since I got here.

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<p>Rima Te Wiata and Morgana O&#39;Reilly are a very funny mother-daughter team in the clever haunted house movie &#39;Housebound&#39;</p>

Rima Te Wiata and Morgana O'Reilly are a very funny mother-daughter team in the clever haunted house movie 'Housebound'

Credit: SXSW 2014

Review: 'Housebound' is an above-average execution of the haunted house genre

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Smart and funny, someone needs to snap this up

AUSTIN - Sometimes at the festival you walk into a room knowing nothing, sit down, and get your skull punched in by a movie that is calibrated perfectly, that knows exactly what it wants to do, and that seems almost unnaturally confident considering it was made by a first-time feature director.

"Housebound" is one of those movies.

There is something about the New Zealand sense of humor that I find enormously charming. It's very dry, very matter of fact, and "Housebound" is that rare film that manages to be funny without defusing any of its scares. What starts out as one genre of film turns out to be something entirely different, and instead of that feeling like one big cheat, it's actually handled in such a way that you can't help but admire the writing and the careful way in which things are revealed.

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<p>Rob Thomas was thrilled to get more money to play with for the &#39;Veronica Mars&#39; film, but it sounds like he made every dollar count.</p>

Rob Thomas was thrilled to get more money to play with for the 'Veronica Mars' film, but it sounds like he made every dollar count.

Credit: HitFix

Rob Thomas talks about creating a sense of scale for 'Veronica Mars'

Plus guess what part of the film he feels like he fumbled

Rob Thomas has a habit of creating television shows I love.

As habits go, that seems to be a good one, but for some reason, these shows that he creates that I love never seem to last long enough.

Take "Cupid," for example. The first incarnation of the show ran for fifteen episodes in 1998, starring Jeremy Piven and Paula Marshall, and it was charming and smart and featured a cast that had off-the-charts chemistry with each other.

Then there was "Veronica Mars," which managed a full 64 episodes over three seasons, starring Kristen Bell, and it was charming and smart and featured a cast that had off-the-charts chemistry with each other.

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