<p>Rain, the star of this weekend's 'Ninja Assassin,' sat down with our reporter to try and pick up a few fitness tips&nbsp;</p>

Rain, the star of this weekend's 'Ninja Assassin,' sat down with our reporter to try and pick up a few fitness tips 

Credit: Warner Bros.

Watch: Rain, his six-pack, and James McTeigue discuss 'Ninja Assassin'

We compare abs with Rain and he compares himself to Bruce Lee

Last Friday, I had a busy day away from the house, filled with all sorts of interesting things.  For example, I finally tracked down and ate at the Grilled Cheese Truck here in LA, which was parked in Hollywood for lunch. It was every bit as amazing as I hoped it would be, and if you ever see them, stop and try the mac-and-cheese and pulled-pork-BBQ grilled cheese sandwich.  It is just plain crazy.

I also went to one of the various studio lots here in town and saw one of the various Christmas movies that is coming out soon, although I'm sworn to silence on that for about another week.  What I can share with you is the way the morning started, in the Hollywood Hills, perched above the Magic Castle at the Yamashiro Restaurant.

Warner Bros. took over the patio of the restaurant for the TV press day for "Ninja Assassin," and I dropped by to talk to the film's star, Korean pop idol Rain, as well as the director of the movie, James McTeigue.  The two of them together were in a great mood, chatting and cracking jokes between interviews, and by the time I sat down across from them, they were on a roll, ready to talk, and the resulting conversation was good fun.

I am particularly impressed by the sheer bravado Rain exhibits when I ask him about being compared to Bruce Lee if he ends up making that "Enter The Dragon" remake that is so heavily rumored.  Without a moment's hesitation, Rain offers up his opinion of just how he stacks up to the martial arts legend, and you've got to love somebody who is this confident, this willing to commit hubris with a smile.

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<p>This gorilla is about to do to Seth Green what 'Old Dogs' is going to do to audiences this weekend, and it ain't gonna be pretty&nbsp;</p>

This gorilla is about to do to Seth Green what 'Old Dogs' is going to do to audiences this weekend, and it ain't gonna be pretty 

Credit: Walt Disney Company

The M/C Review: Is it possible to hate a film more than 'Old Dogs'?

Someone tell the police that John Travolta and Robin Williams just pulled a hate crime

If "Old Dogs" were a person, I would stab it in the face.

Millions of years from now, after Western Civilization has fallen and the Earth has ruptured and cooled and been reborn and a new life form has taken over the planet, if any of them happen to stumble upon a working DVD player and a copy of "Old Dogs," they will sum up the passing of our culture with two simple words:  "Good riddance."

It is rare that I hate a film with the feverish intensity that I feel towards this one, but it hit pretty much every single button for me, and by halfway through, I felt like I was going to crawl out of my skin.  What I thought was going to be a mediocre family-themed comedy instead struck me as one of the most singularly vile experiences I've had in a theater all year.  To give you an idea how wretched the film is, if you take the worst Robin Williams film, multiply it by the worst John Travolta film, and then multiply that by "Wild Hogs," the last film from director Walt Becker, you would still end up with something better than this.

"Old Dogs" is the story of two ostensible adult human beings who, confronted with spending 14 days in the presence of twin seven-year-olds, promptly go insane and begin acting in a manner which would land any person in the real world in jail or the morgue.  Deservedly.  Nothing in this film resembles any recognizable behavior of any actual person ever.  At one point, Bernie Mac shows up as a puppeteer who literally wires Robin Williams up with a magical bio-rig that transforms him into... and I quote... a "human puppet" who is controlled via remote by John Travolta so that Williams can have a tea party with his daughter.  And although I was sliding in and out of consciousness by this point, numb from the horror, I'm almost positive a Motown song plays over the resulting montage.

And that is not the worst scene in the film.

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<p>Kodi-Smit McPhee and Viggo Mortensen play father and son at the end of the world in 'The Road,' John Hillcoat's adaptation of the acclaimed Cormac McCarthy novel</p>

Kodi-Smit McPhee and Viggo Mortensen play father and son at the end of the world in 'The Road,' John Hillcoat's adaptation of the acclaimed Cormac McCarthy novel

Credit: The Weinstein Company

The M/C Review: 'The Road' proves tricky to adapt

There's some meat on the bones, but not enough to nourish

Cormac McCarthy is not an easy author to adapt from page to screen. 

Each of his books seems to pose a different challenge to screenwriters and directors, too, and so there's no one answer for how to crack the problem of bringing his books to the bigscreen.  I think the Coens did a tremendous job with "No Country For Old Men," and there are parts of "All The Pretty Horses" that work very well, even if the film as a whole is sort of a heavily-manhandled mess as it was released.

"The Road" was a very different type of challenge, and it's one that I'm not sure John Hillcoat mastered.  He makes a valiant attempt, but the ways the film frustrated me as a viewer suggest that the job just plain got away from him, and as an end result, I think the film is muted, half-hearted, and dissatisfying, and one of the year's big heartbreaks, all things considered.

There is, after all, a long and healthy tradition of post-apocalyptic cinema, some of it trashy, some of it more serious-minded, and there are certainly classics in the genre that are hard to beat.  For "The Road" to stand apart from what's come before, it needed to find a particular angle on the material that we haven't seen before, or contribute something new to the language of how the ruined world might be portrayed on film. The dirty secret of McCarthy's justly-acclaimed novel is that the appeal does not lie in the story being told, but in how that story is told.  It's not what happens... it's the way McCarthy tells it.  "The Road" is all about language, about the evocative nature of how McCarthy paints his picture, and the spare emotional detail. It's a powerhouse of a book, but it's not especially a powerhouse of a story.

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<p>More and more key art for James Cameron's 'Avatar' is showing up online, including an international one-sheet that features this image&nbsp;</p>

More and more key art for James Cameron's 'Avatar' is showing up online, including an international one-sheet that features this image 

Credit: 20th Century Fox

The Morning Read: 'Avatar' hype heats up as Cameron does '60 Minutes'

Plus what makes a film profitable? 'Dock Ellis' and Edward Woodward

Welcome to The Morning Read.

'Tis the season.  Oscar-hopeful films are starting to screen heavily, and at this point, almost everything's been seen by someone.  In the last few days, I've seen "Nine," and I've got several films lined up this week that aren't coming out until the end of December.  It seems like the last of these films that's going to screen for anyone is "Avatar," which makes sense.  They're still putting all the last minute technical touches on the film, and I'm sure the first time Cameron screens it for press, he wants it to be 100% finished so that they get the full intended experience.

He is, after all, HMFIC.

If you don't know what that means, then you probably didn't see the piece that "60 Minutes" ran last night about "Avatar" and Cameron.  And why would Cameron sit down with a news magazine show that pretty much no one under a certain age watches anymore?  Ten minutes after the show ended, there was a message on my answering machine from my 60+ year old mother, telling me to tune in and check it out.  "Avatar" was already on her radar because she reads my work, but if it wasn't, that would have done the trick.

Right now, the most important thing for 20th Century Fox is getting the word out to every single demographic, every single niche audience, and every single potential ticket buyer.  They don't just want you to see "Avatar" on December 18th.  They NEED for you to see "Avatar."  And not just once, either.  They're hoping that they will get you on the hook for repeat viewings.  Over and over.

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<p>Nicolas Cage and Eva Mendes in one of the rare quiet moments from Werner Herzog's wackadoo update 'Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans'&nbsp;</p>

Nicolas Cage and Eva Mendes in one of the rare quiet moments from Werner Herzog's wackadoo update 'Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans' 

Credit: First Look Studios

The M/C Review: 'Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans' serves up delicious crazy

Werner Herzog and Nic Cage have indecent fun while being bad

It's been a while since I've proudly identified myself as a Nicolas Cage fan.

But I'm saying it here, and I'm saying it's because of all the years in the wilderness, not in spite of it.

I've been there from the start.  13-year-old me saw "Valley Girl" in the theater.  Twice, courtesy the movie theater usher older brother of a friend.  14-year-old-me took two different girls to see "Racing With The Moon" when it played, and both times, I got to touch a boob as a direct result of the movie, which automatically made it better-than-almost-any-other-movie-EVER.  

Cage was a guy who was part of a young group of actors who I looked up to, who felt like the first people from my generation to break through in movies in any way.  When I saw "Birdy" in 1984, the same year "Racing With The Moon" and "The Cotton Club" came out, I flipped.  I got evangelical about that film for a while.  LOVED it.  In two short years, Cage had been in three films I considered significant plus a handful of others, so when he sort of disappeared for a few years, it was confounding.  

Then came the one-two punch that made me rank Cage as perhaps the most eccentric and hilarious actor of his peer group, "Peggy Sue Got Married" and "Raising Arizona." 1986 and 1987.  And as far as I was concerned, that was it.  Cage was amazing, fearless, insane, inventive and always worth watching.

So of course nobody knew what to do with him.

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<p>Jae Head, Quinton Aaron, and Sandra Bullock all enjoy story time in a scene from 'The Blind Side'</p>

Jae Head, Quinton Aaron, and Sandra Bullock all enjoy story time in a scene from 'The Blind Side'

Credit: Warner Bros.

The M/C Review: 'The Blind Side' with Sandra Bullock transcends cliche

Yes, it's familiar material, but done oh-so-well

I've offered up a few bits of coverage of this film this week, including a talk with the director, John Lee Hancock, and an interview with Leigh Anne Touhy, the woman whose real life inspired the film in the first place.  If you've read those interviews, then you might have picked up by now that I was surprised by how much I enjoyed "The Blind Side."

Based on a book by Michael Lewis, "The Blind Side" tells the story of Michael Oher, who is now a left tackle for the Baltimore Ravens, but who started life as a kid with pretty much everything stacked against him.  The film is ostensibly a sports drama, but it violates a lot of the "rules" of the genre, to good effect.  Instead of having everything hinge on the games we watch, Hancock keeps the focus squarely on the people and their story, and the result is affecting.  Simple, direct, but affecting.

Michael Oher (Quinton Aaron) was a kid growing up in the worst parts of Memphis when he managed to get enrolled in a private school, where he ended up in class with the kids of Sean Touhy (Tim McGraw) and his wife Leigh Anne (Sandra Bullock).  When Leigh Anne realized Michael was essentially homeless, taking care of himself, she reached out and offered him a place to stay.  What started as a temporary act of kindness ended up changing their family when the Touhys slowly came to think of Michael as their son. Due to his enormous size, Michael was identified early on as a possible football player, and it was only once Leigh Anne helped him realize what special skills he brought to the game that he unlocked his potential and became a star, eventually winning a chance at college and a life he never would have had without the Touhys.

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<p>You want epic? &nbsp;This is John Woo's idea of a small intimate moment in the absurdly large-scale 'Red Cliff,' playing in limited release and available in VOD&nbsp;</p>

You want epic?  This is John Woo's idea of a small intimate moment in the absurdly large-scale 'Red Cliff,' playing in limited release and available in VOD 

Credit: Magnet Releasing

Watch: John Woo discusses his new epic 'Red Cliff'

Did returning to China turn him back into a great filmmaker?

Meeting John Woo is one of those things I can now knock off of my personal checklist, and I'm pleased to report he was delightful and very warm and personable.

I'm also pleased to report that "Red Cliff," his latest film, is a giant epic slice of John Woo battle sequences, duplicity among men, and slow-motion that is perfectly utilized.  In other words, this is a real John Woo film, not that weak sauce Hollywood kept trying to get him to make.

It's disconcerting that the version we're seeing here in the United States is literally half of the movie he meant for it to be. Released in China as two movies totally five hours, "Red Cliff" has been turned into one two-and-a-half-hour movie for release here.  I almost don't think I can offer a review of the film until I've seen the two-part version, because while I enjoyed what I saw, it's blatantly obvious that it is a heavily trimmed version of something.

In the brief time we had together, I asked Woo about returning to China to make movies and bringing these big Hollywood techniques to an industry that's used to doing things in a very different way.  I don't appear on camera in this brief interview, so you'll just hear Woo discussing the film, but I swear... I was in the room, basking in the glow of the dude who made "Hard Boiled":

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<p>Viggo Mortensen and Kodi-Smit McPhee play a father and son lost in a ruined world in John Hillcoat's film adaptation of &quot;The Road&quot;</p>

Viggo Mortensen and Kodi-Smit McPhee play a father and son lost in a ruined world in John Hillcoat's film adaptation of "The Road"

Credit: The Weinstein Company

Watch: Viggo Mortensen talks about life on 'The Road'

Joined by his young co-star, the 'Lord Of The Rings' vet opens up

I've always been a fan of Viggo Mortensen's work, at least since the first time I really noticed him in a film back in "The Indian Runner," which nailed me to a wall.  One of the things that I enjoyed most about watching the "Lord Of The Rings" phenomenon explode was seeing the general public discover Mortensen on a level that had never happened before.

Since then, he's had several big moments, most notably his collaborations with David Cronenberg, and now he's about to find himself back in theaters in the adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's piercing, difficult novel The Road.  While I was in Toronto, I had a chance to sit down with both Mortensen and his young co-star, Kodi Smit-McPhee, and ask them about the process of working together to create a believable father-son relationship onscreen.

A quick note... we're not in control of the technical side of these interviews, so sometimes we find ourselves working with whatever we've got when we leave the room.  In this case, I am baffled by the sound mix on this thing.  My microphone was evidently taped to one of my buttcheeks based on how muffled I am when talking, and Mortensen is such a soft-spoken guy in real life that even if they'd put the microphone inside his mouth, I'm not sure it would have been much better than this.

His answers are still worth a listen, though.  Just crank it up after the film clips end:

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<p>Sandra Bullock plays real-life force of nature Leigh Anne Touhy in 'The Blind Side'&nbsp;</p>

Sandra Bullock plays real-life force of nature Leigh Anne Touhy in 'The Blind Side' 

Credit: Warner Bros.

The M/C Interview: Leigh Anne Touhy tells her story in 'The Blind Side'

Meet the woman Sandra Bullock plays in the new film

This is an unusual interview for me.  I'm used to talking to writers, directors, actors, producers, cinematographer, editors... all the people typically involved with making movies.  It's much more uncommon for me to hop on the phone with someone whose life has been turned into a movie, the "based on" in the "based on a true story" equation.

With Leigh Anne Touhy, I figured it would be interesting to give it a try.  She's presented as such a dynamo in the new film from John Lee Hancock, with Sandra Bullock doing some of her best dramatic work playing her, that I knew it wouldn't be boring.

LEIGH ANNE TOUHY:  Hello, Drew, how are you?

DREW MCWEENY:  I'm fine, Mrs. Touhy. It’s a pleasure to meet you.

LAT:  Well, thank you so much. You’re a boy Drew.  I knew a Drew could be a girl or a boy.

DM:  Yes.  I am a boy Drew.

LAT:  You’re a boy Drew.  Okay, then!

DM:   My parents both attended Ole Miss.

LAT:  Yeah?  Then you’re a wonderful boy Drew.

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<p>Black Cat has a &nbsp;long and rich history as a character in the Spider-Man universe, and now Marvel may be bringing her to the big screen</p>

Black Cat has a  long and rich history as a character in the Spider-Man universe, and now Marvel may be bringing her to the big screen

Credit: Marvel Comics

Who's playing The Black Cat in 'Spider-Man 4,' and why should you care?

Lesser-known Marvel character takes center stage in online catch-your-tail

When even Nikki Finke decides to throw her hat in on a geek movie rumor, it's time to talk about it.

I'm not a fan of this point in the casting process, when names start flying and people start reporting non-news breathlessly every day.  It's one thing when we get down to the point of people doing screen tests... those are serious contenders for something.  But just coming in to meet the producers on a meet and greet does not mean someone is "in talks" for a role. It sounds to me like right now, "Spider-Man 4" is at the stage where they are casting a wide next, looking for someone to step in and play The Black Cat, aka Felicia Hardy, one of the many ohmygodhawt female antagonists who have tormented Peter Parker over the years.

At this point, it seems to be accepted as fact that Felicia Hardy is in the film.  In truth, all we've heard officially is that they are looking for a new "female lead," and that they are not replacing Kirsten Dunst.  Much of what I'm reading about this particular actor search is speculation, which is one of the reasons I've been slow to pick the story up.  I've been waiting to see if my own sources could cough up something I could treat as fact.  So far, all is quiet, though, which is strange.  If this is such a hotly debated part, and they're really looking at names like Rachel McAdams, Anne Hathaway, Romola Garai, and Julia Stiles, then why is everything so quiet in the places I'm looking?

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