New 'Agent 47' poster has all the guns

I'm not really sure what the plot is in this summer's "Agent 47," based on the "Hitman" video game franchise, but I'm going to guess it involves guns.

Here's the synopsis from IGN, where they just premiered the new poster for the film:

Hitman: Agent 47 centers on an elite assassin who was genetically engineered from conception to be the perfect killing machine, and is known only by the last two digits on the barcode tattooed on the back of his neck. He is the culmination of decades of research ­ and forty-six earlier Agent clones -- endowing him with unprecedented strength, speed, stamina and intelligence. His latest target is a mega-corporation that plans to unlock the secret of Agent 47's past to create an army of killers whose powers surpass even his own. Teaming up with a young woman who may hold the secret to overcoming their powerful and clandestine enemies, 47 confronts stunning revelations about his own origins and squares off in an epic battle with his deadliest foe

Yep. Guns. Lots of them.

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Review: Nicholas Sparks serves up some tepid leftovers with 'The Longest Ride'
Credit: 20th Century Fox

Review: Nicholas Sparks serves up some tepid leftovers with 'The Longest Ride'

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Clint Eastwood's son has his nose, but the jury's still out on the charisma

If you were to gain access to the computer where Nicholas Sparks writes his books, I'll bet you'd find that "search and replace" is the most commonly used function.

"The Longest Ride" is the latest movie to escape from the popular romance writer's head, and it is about as flimsy an exercise in formula as you're likely to see this year. It's not that it is unprofessionally made, or that it lacks the polish of a typical studio release. Far from it. The film is handsomely produced, and everyone does exactly what they were hired to do, both in front of the camera and behind it.

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'Star Wars: The Digital Collection' set for an April 10th worldwide release
Credit: Disney

'Star Wars: The Digital Collection' set for an April 10th worldwide release

A plethora of bonus features will be available with the HD digital releases

While it is not the answer to their prayers that "Star Wars" fans have been hoping for, there is big news tonight.

"Star Wars: The Digital Collection" will be available for purchase in the digital world for the first time on April 10th. This may not be the exact version that fans continue to vocally demand the most frequently, but it does give fans a new way to watch their favorite films, and it also will come with a slew of new extra features.

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Guy Ritchie lives every English kid's dream with his own sword in a stone

There are four icons I would imagine loom large in the imagination of anyone raised in England, and Guy Ritchie is currently hard at work bringing the second of them to the screen, following his work on the two "Sherlock Holmes" films he made for Warner Bros.

King Arthur and the legend of Camelot are obviously known around the world, but they are innately English. You would have to grow up in a country with an active monarchy in order to truly understand the fantasy of being plucked from obscurity to rule the country. Like everything these days, this is being pictured as part of a much larger franchise. The film is called "Knights Of The Roundtable: King Arthur," which would suggest that they can make as many films as there are seats at the table if they want to, and I'm sure they'd want to.

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The director of Pixar's short film 'Lava' on his emotional gem's Hawaiian origin
Credit: Deborah Coleman/Pixar

The director of Pixar's short film 'Lava' on his emotional gem's Hawaiian origin

This is one seriously pretty little movie

When you see “Inside Out” in the theater this summer, the short film in front of it will be called “Lava,” and it is a labor of love for writer/director James Ford Murphy.

If you want to know about the film itself, you should check out my reaction piece from the event, which I'll post on Wednesday, but before I left the Pixar campus, I sat down with Murphy to talk about his film, the inspiration behind it, and the odd effect it had on the animators who worked on it.

When I walked into the room, he looked at my shirt, which read “Cassius Clay,” and immediately remarked on it. We talked about boxing and Ali specifically for a few before the publicist asked us to start. It put us in a great mood as the conversation opened.

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Producer Jonas Rivera on 'Inside Out' director Pete Docter's specific genius
Credit: Deborah Coleman/Pixar

Producer Jonas Rivera on 'Inside Out' director Pete Docter's specific genius

From intern to producer, Rivera's done it all at the studio

Last week, I joined a group of journalists at Pixar in Emeryville, where we were shown the first hour of "Inside Out," this summer's new Pixar film. You can get a look at some of what we did in this gallery, and you can see some concept art for the film embedded below.

The last interview of my day was with Jonas Rivera, who produced “Inside Out.” Rivera started at Pixar as an intern, making him pretty much the walking incarnation of a success story at the studio. We’d spoken earlier in the day as part of a round-table along with director Pete Docter, but this was my chance to speak to Rivera one-on-one.

DREW MCWEENY:  I said this when you were in the room earlier: I feel like each Pixar director at this point has a signature and has something that they bring to the table that makes their films different. I don't think of Pixar as this monolithic style. I think that its strongest quality, because it has so many very strong voices that work under that banner. I don't know what it is about Pete, though. His films punch a hole in me. Just the hour we saw last night, there were about four or five moments that gutted me. It's interesting that he seems to not be afraid to express loss, which is something that American movies are hugely terrified of. Yet those are some of the strongest moments in his films, where he embraces that and takes a moment to reflect on it.

JONAS RIVERA:  Well, that's why I love working with him. I mean, that's why I'm proud to be his partner, because that's what I love about the movies. I mean, I look at Pete, and I think of the trifecta. The original Pixar is John [Lasseter], Andrew [Stanton] and Pete [Docter], right? This is how I've always thought of it. John has his finger on the pulse of the world. He’s a populist. The biggest high-concept ideas, that's John. Andrew is on the other side of the spectrum. He's more of an auteur and a writer.

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See This Or Die: 'Out Of The Past'
Credit: Warner Archive

See This Or Die: 'Out Of The Past'

Robert Mitchum in the greatest film noir of all time... what's not to love?
Our weekly feature in which a writer answers the question: if you could force your friends at gunpoint to watch one movie or TV show what would it be?

Why do I love film noir?

Why does anyone? After all, it's a genre that seems to confirm that people are horrible, that the world is painful, and that we will let each other down given any opportunity. Film noir has a world-weary worldview, but I would stop short of calling it cynical. I am many things as I reach the halfway point of my fourth decade on Earth, but I am not cynical. I love film noir because while it may reflect a cynical world view, the reason it hurts is because there is still some small light, some tiny hope, some sense of optimism. If you're truly cynical, there's nothing the world can do to disappoint you. Me, I get my heart broken all the time.

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James Wan calls his 'Furious 7' experience 'big and exhausting'
Credit: Universal Pictures

James Wan calls his 'Furious 7' experience 'big and exhausting'

We also discuss the way diversity plays a role in the success of the series

I misjudged James Wan.

When "Saw" was being prepped for release, I was approached by the creative execs at Twisted Pictures, along with my writing partner, about spitballing ideas for sequels, since they already saw it as a franchise. It was one in a flurry of meetings, and we didn't have an immediate reaction, and so we let it go. Didn't really chase it. Smart, right?

For a little while, I wasn't really sure what to make of Wan as a director. I didn't like "Dead Silence" much at all, and I wasn't sure what to make of the wild swings in tone in "Death Sentence." It wasn't until the midnight premiere of "Insidious" at the Toronto Film Festival that I was 100% onboard, and it felt like Wan had become a different, more confident filmmaker at that point, like he was serious about his craft in a different way. I was enormously fond of "The Conjuring" as well.

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Jason Statham on 'Furious 7' fight with The Rock: 'He could take your head off'
Credit: Universal Pictures

Jason Statham on 'Furious 7' fight with The Rock: 'He could take your head off'

Plus which movie do you absolutely have to double-feature with 'Furious 7' this summer?

Jason Statham is intimidating.

I mean, that's sort of obvious. He's built a career on it. But part of what I find so interesting about him onscreen has been his resolute refusal to vanish into roles. Jason Statham is one of those movie stars who is a movie star for being a heightened version of himself, and he knows that's his brand, and he absolutely steers into it with the choices he makes.

This year, audiences are going to see two radically different versions of Statham onscreen. In Paul Feig's clever and rowdy "Spy," Statham is a perpetually livid CIA agent who cannot believe the agency would send Melissa McCarthy's character into the field when he's available for the job. It's a great fit for him, and his mounting incredulity combined with his near-manic need to tell McCarthy how awesome he is and his surprisingly nimble way with a pratfall make it a stand-out for him, something that feels new.

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Alex Ross Perry takes on one of Disney's biggest icons with 'Winnie The Pooh'
Credit: Disney

Alex Ross Perry takes on one of Disney's biggest icons with 'Winnie The Pooh'

Another interesting hire for a very high-stakes piece of the Disney empire

There are certain works of art that are larger than even their creators ever intended, that ripple through culture for generations in ways that no one could have expected. I am relatively sure that when A.A. Milne wrote his two classic books about his son, Christopher Robin Milne, and the stuffed animals he played with while growing up, the author had no idea just how deeply those books would pierce generations of readers.

There are two books by Benjamin Hoff that I fell in love with in college in which Hoff uses the Milne characters, particularly Winnie-The-Pooh, to examine the belief system Taoism. What sounds like a joke is actually fairly moving and profound, and not only does it do a bang-up job of explaining Taoism, it also points out just how beautiful and nuanced Milne's writing truly is.

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