<p>Lena Headey, based on how funny she is when cameras aren&#39;t rolling, should take a break from the bad-ass thing to do a couple of comedies.</p>

Lena Headey, based on how funny she is when cameras aren't rolling, should take a break from the bad-ass thing to do a couple of comedies.

Credit: HitFix

Lena Headey on the differences between shooting the '300' films and 'Game Of Thrones'

Oh, yeah, she plays good guys, too

Lena Headey has had a very fruitful run as a horrible, horrible person for the last few years. Images of Queen Cersei and Ma-Ma from "Game Of Thrones" and "Dredd" had all but crowded out the impression she made in the original "300" as Queen Gorgo.

Sitting down with her at the recent press day for "300: Rise Of An Empire," I was struck by how easily she's built a reputation for herself as a powerful on-screen figure. My oldest son is currently obsessed with all things related to "The Terminator," despite the fact that he hasn't seen any of the films yet. He listens to the scores for the first two films, he's read every word of a Cinefex issue released when "Terminator 2" came out, and he has several Terminator toys that he considers prized possessions. When he realized that Headey was one of the actors who has played Sarah Connor, he just about lost his mind.

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<p>&#39;Anchorman 2&#39; is not just longer in theaters now, but almost completely different</p>

'Anchorman 2' is not just longer in theaters now, but almost completely different

Credit: Paramount Pictures

What's so different about the R-rated cut of 'Anchorman 2' in theaters now?

And in the end, which cut works better?

The term "director's cut" has been abused to the point of meaninglessness in the age of special edition DVDs, and it is easy for the consumer to eventually tune out any mention of a "new" version of a film, sure they're only going to see a few small differences after sitting through something they have, for the most part, already seen and fully digested.

That is not the case with the R-rated cut of "Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues" that is in theaters at the moment. This may well set the new standard for just how different an alternative cut of a film can be, and it's a fascinating exercise in how just a few choices can make the difference between two different ratings and, in a world where studios are spending tens of millions of dollars to market a film, the economic success or failure of a movie.

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<p>Ralph Fiennes is at his very best in the delightful new film &#39;The Grand Budapest Hotel&#39; by Wes Anderson</p>

Ralph Fiennes is at his very best in the delightful new film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' by Wes Anderson

Credit: Fox Searchlight

Review: Wes Anderson's 'Grand Budapest Hotel' is both goofy and gorgeous

HitFix
A+
Readers
A-
Ralph Fiennes has never been better

Wes Anderson has settled into his identity as a filmmaker, and by now, you probably have a pretty fair idea what you think of his voice and his general storytelling style. That's true of a lot of filmmakers, and even within that basic identity they create, there tend to be films that are more or less successful overall, films that feel like they represent the very best of what someone does. It is safe to say that "The Grand Budapest Hotel" is one of those breakthrough moments, a movie that is so beautifully realized from start to finish that I almost doubted myself on the way home. Could I really have enjoyed that film that much?

A Russian nesting-doll of a movie, this is a story within a story within a story within a story for much of its running time, with additional layers either peeled back or laid on top at various points, and there's a real beauty to the way Anderson structures everything. Without giving away all the wonderful layers to the game he's playing, it's safe to say that "The Grand Budapest Hotel" tells the story of how Gustave H., the concierge of the Grand Budapest, ends up mentoring Zero Moustafa, a lobby boy who is there when war finally ruins the world in which the Grand Budapest exists. It is a love story, a heist movie, a farce, a prison break mission movie, and a sort of beautiful ode to a time that has passed, and it juggles all these disparate threads in a way that is breathtaking and elegant.

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<p>Eva Green commands the screen in the delirious new sequel &#39;300: Rise Of An Empire&#39;</p>

Eva Green commands the screen in the delirious new sequel '300: Rise Of An Empire'

Credit: Warner Bros/Legendary

Review: Eva Green gives a can't-miss performance in the crazy new '300' sequel

HitFix
B
Readers
n/a
Fans of the first film should expect more of the same here

The first question that would seem to apply when regarding any sequel is "Does this feel like it is of a piece with the first film?" It doesn't have to be the same movie to be a successful sequel, but it should do something interesting. It should either be a response to the first film or a deliberately different type of film or it should build on some interesting story thread or it should enhance our understanding of the world or the characters. By that standard, "300: Rise Of An Empire" is a worthy sequel to "300," stylistically consistent and equally loony, featuring what may well be the first truly can't-miss performance in a film this year.

It would not shock me if, twenty years from now, people talk about this film the way they talk about "Poltergeist" now, simply accepting it as common knowledge that Zack Snyder "really" directed the film. It is so precise in the way it builds off the first film's visual style and so carefully built to wrap around the events of the first film narratively that it feels more like deleted scenes from the first film instead of something that stands alone. That may sound like an insult, but it's not. I would assume Snyder, who co-wrote the script with Kurt Johnstad, probably signed off on every single storyboard, and I am sure Noam Murro was given full access to all the resources that Snyder had at his disposal. It's remarkable how much this feels like it is simply more of the same story, told the same way.

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<p>Contrary to how it felt watching the movie, there are actual moments where Diogo Morgado does not smile in &#39;Son Of God&#39;</p>

Contrary to how it felt watching the movie, there are actual moments where Diogo Morgado does not smile in 'Son Of God'

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Review: 'Son Of God' is all mini-series left-overs and no miracle

HitFix
C-
Readers
n/a
It's the ultimate Teflon treatment of the Greatest Story Ever Told

As the news broke this week that Paul Greengrass is interested in finding a way to bring "Zealot" the bigscreen, it made me sad that we still haven't seen Paul Verhoeven's proposed movie about the historical Jesus Christ. It's a subject Verhoeven's been studying for decades now, and I have to imagine he would bring a real breadth of knowledge to his approach. Like Verhoeven, I would assume Greengrass is going to try to dig deep to show us something we haven't already seen from this story.

Any time a filmmaker tries to tackle a subject as big and vague as "Jesus" for a movie, you're going to learn a lot about the filmmaker from the final product. However, Christopher Spencer has put that theory of mine to the test by turning in a genuinely bland and forgettable picture here, about as middle-of-the-road as a movie can be.

I have no doubt the film will do big business this weekend. It's a perfect film for the faith-based audience to get behind, because there is no chance this movie will rile or upset anyone from that audience. Diogo Morgado stars as Smilin' Jesus, and the emphasis seems to be on how Jesus built his following, with a fair amount of energy spent on the early miracles he performed, none of which come across as particularly miraculous or convincing.

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<p>Normally, I&#39;d be scared of these two more than any human being in the cast, but then again, I&#39;ve seen &#39;Full Metal Jacket&#39;</p>

Normally, I'd be scared of these two more than any human being in the cast, but then again, I've seen 'Full Metal Jacket'

Credit: Universal Pictures

Vincent D'Onofrio signs on as the bad guy in 'Jurassic World'

So far, Colin Trevorrow's put together a great cast for this one

When I recently published a piece about "Fantastic Four," a commenter asked why everyone seems determined to cut slack to Josh Trank as director of that film. While I enjoyed "Chronicle," it's not just a blank check. For my own part, I can only say that I want to see Trank pull it off. I don't know if he will or won't, and it's true… we have only one film to judge. But that does't change the idea that I'd much rather get a great "Fantastic Four" than a bad one, and I'm willing to wait to see if the big choices he's making pay off instead of just pulling that automatic fanboy dismissal of things.

I feel the same way about Colin Trevorrow. "Safety Not Guaranteed" is enjoyable, but didn't exactly blow my mind. I am still not sure what it is about that small romantic drama that made the producers of "Jurassic World" decide he was the guy, but like Trank, I think he genuinely loves the property he's working on and I hope he pulls it off.

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<p>I hope he&#39;s either playing this role from &#39;Watchmen&#39; or the dude he played in &#39;Hard Candy&#39;</p>

I hope he's either playing this role from 'Watchmen' or the dude he played in 'Hard Candy'

Credit: Warner Bros

Patrick Wilson takes a still-unnamed role in Edgar Wright's 'Ant-Man'

It's amazing how much we don't know about this film so far

Despite my best efforts, I am unable to figure out who Patrick Wilson will be playing for "Ant-Man," directed by Edgar Wright from a script by Wright and Joe Cornish.

With many of the Marvel movies, it is a simple process of elimination. If you're at all familiar with the property, then you can guess who's playing what, but in this case, Wright and Cornish are doing something that is not going to be building off of any one particular storyline or even era of the comic. They're taking some characters people know and building a very different story around them that also now folds into the ongoing story that the larger Marvel movie universe has been telling for the last five or six years.

Patrick Wilson is joining the cast in what has ben described as "the last big role still open," and I have no idea who he could be. I'm hearing that Michael Douglas will be shown in action in the past, and even with digital technology, I'm guessing Douglas won't actually play those parts in flashback. Instead, they'll have to use someone else to play Yellowjacket at the height of his spy days. Could that be the part that Wilson will play? It would be an interesting way of setting up a very different franchise than anything else Marvel's got going right now.

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<p>These are the faces of 2014&#39;s biggest fumble so far.</p>

These are the faces of 2014's biggest fumble so far.

Credit: Roadside Attractions/Lionsgate/Warner Bros

Two months in, what are the worst films of 2014?

Action hero monsters, gooey historical dramas, and insipid love stories a-plenty

We're just now approaching the end of the second month of 2014, and yet I am already winded.

The start of the year is traditionally a time of studios dumping the movies that they couldn't quite slot anywhere else, and one of the reasons those films sometimes have trouble finding a home is because they just plain didn't work out. Talented people with the best of intentions sometimes simply miss the mark, and when that happens, studios find themselves playing a game to try to get people into the theater before word of mouth gets out.

There have definitely been some bright spots this year. I think "The LEGO Movie" is pure delight, and audiences seem to agree, turning it into a full-blown sensation. Sundance always helps kick the year off with some great new films. "The Raid 2" and "Whiplash" and "The Guest" and a fistful of other titles all made that a great ten days of fun films.

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<p>Is this the next big thing in family films?</p>

Is this the next big thing in family films?

Credit: Mojang

Could 'Minecraft' be the new 'Lego Movie' for Warner Bros?

That's certainly what the studio's got to be hoping right now

It's pretty easy to guess what the big conversation in development offices all over town has been for the last few weeks, since the moment "The LEGO Movie" hit theaters with nuclear force.

Right now, executives at every studio are asking their kids, "What do you like to play with?" And I am willing to bet that they are all hearing the exact same word in response.

"Minecraft."

At this point in the life of my own kids, computer games are not an option, especially if there is any part of those games that can be used to communicate with them from other people. Even so, thanks to their friends, they are just as "Minecraft" crazy as the kids who are actually playing it.

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<p>You know why I couldn&#39;t fit Ray into this image? Because Ivan Reitman had a great eye for scope composition when he shot 1984&#39;s &#39;Ghostbusters&#39;</p>

You know why I couldn't fit Ray into this image? Because Ivan Reitman had a great eye for scope composition when he shot 1984's 'Ghostbusters'

Credit: Columbia Pictures

You don't want to see 'Ghostbusters 3,' even if you think you do

Isn't it time to let this one rest?

I want to ask you a question.

Do you really want to see "Ghostbusters 3"?

Before you answer, I want you to consider every angle. I don't want the knee-jerk response, because I know what the knee-jerk response is, and so does Columbia, and so do Dan Aykroyd and Ivan Reitman. The knee-jerk response is easy. After all, I love the original 1984 film "Ghostbusters," and I'm more than willing to cop to a fondness for the admittedly-lesser sequel. On the surface, the thought of more "Ghostbusters" is appealing. Undeniably so.

I won't lie. When I was 21 or 22 years old, my writing partner Scott Swan and I had an elaborate written treatment for "Ghostbusters 3" that I was convinced I was somehow going to get in front of the right people. After all, when I was 21 and 22 years old, I had almost constant access to Joe Medjuck, Michael Gross, and Ivan Reitman thanks to my job at Dave's Video. I never found myself in a position to connect those two dots, though, and 43 year old me laughs at how painfully earnest the younger me was about this sequel idea.

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