<p>Phil Rosenthal and Ray Romano are obviously listening to this week's edition of the Motion/Captured Podcast.</p>

Phil Rosenthal and Ray Romano are obviously listening to this week's edition of the Motion/Captured Podcast.

Credit: Sony Pictures

Listen: The Motion/Captured Podcast with 'Raymond' creator Phil Rosenthal

Plus the return of Movie God and this week's new releases

It's been a while since I've had Scott Swan over to record a podcast, and I could blame Comic-Con or I could blame other trips, or I could blame Scott's crazy work schedule or the films he's gearing up to direct, but the truth is, we just plain let it get away from us.  My bad entirely.

This weekend, though, I finally got him over to the house, and we sat down for what turned out to be one of our longest, loosest, strangest podcast recording sessions so far.  The reason I enjoy doing this show with Scott is that I've known him for over 25 years now, and the two of us can gab about pretty much anything with little or no preparation.  It keeps things spontaneous, and almost no one else has the ability to reduce me to helpless tears of laughter as often or as scientifically as him.

I'm still struggling to find the exact right format for the show, but one thing you've been very vocal about is that you want Movie God to be part of the show.  Rest assured, we brought it back this week.  We also have an interview, as normal, this time with Phil Rosenthal, who created "Everybody Loves Raymond."  He has a new documentary out on DVD and Blu-ray right now, and we talked to him about trying to reproduce that hit show for a Russian audience.

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<p>Rachel Nichols may not look combat-ready here, but 'Conan The Barbarian' gives her an opportunity to play rough.</p>

Rachel Nichols may not look combat-ready here, but 'Conan The Barbarian' gives her an opportunity to play rough.

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Rachel Nichols and Rose McGowan on 'Conan' and combat

The ladies of 'Conan' talk about the challenges and pleasures of the shoot

Rose McGowan and Rachel Nichols both play key roles in this weekend's new release, "Conan The Barbarian."  I saw the film a few weeks ago in preparation for the press day, and while I can't review it yet, I can say that it is less a movie and more of a direct and unrelenting assault.  Everything about it is pumped up and insane.  It is Marcus Nispel screaming in your face, something unintelligible about "Howard" and "Crom" and "Boobs" and "Blood."

So.  Much.  Blood.

If you're casting to match the hyper-exaggerated world you've created, then you're looking to cast women who can embody the sort of van-art-super-curvy-exaggerated archetype.  And so you're not just looking for attractive, you're looking for something striking. 

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<p>Ernie Cline poses with the ill-gotten gains of his book sale on the jacket photo from 'Ready Player One'</p>

Ernie Cline poses with the ill-gotten gains of his book sale on the jacket photo from 'Ready Player One'

Credit: Dan Winters/Random House

Review: 'Ready Player One' is the geek book event of the year

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Ernie Cline's first novel offers nostalgia, the future, and a gamer's dream

Ernie Cline has been kicking around the edges of fandom since I first got online, and even before I learned that we had mutual friends, before we ever met, I knew him as the guy who took a not-at-all-bad crack at writing the long-promised sequel "Buckaroo Banzai Against The World Crime League," which endeared him to me right away.  Ernie's the kind of guy who drives a DeLorean with a license plate that reads "ECTO-1" and a specially installed Oscillator Overthruster, and who couldn't care less if you think that's cool or not.  In other words... he's the real deal.  Nerd by blood.  One of us.

In theory, I should be a huge fan of the film he wrote, "Fanboys."  After all, I love "Star Wars," and both Ernie and the film's director Kyle Newman are sharp, funny guys, and the film even directly references Ain't It Cool and Harry Knowles.  That sounds like a movie that was sort of directly engineered to appeal to me, which is why I found it so frustrating and awkward when I didn't love it.  That's a hard position to be in, because the first inclination is to give something a pass.  That's just a human reaction.  I find, though, that when I am in that position, it is a stubborn point of pride for me that I have to be clear and on the record, and I have to set my personal feelings aside about the creators even if I'm afraid it'll burn a bridge.  I don't think you do any artist a favor by lying to them about your reaction to their work, and I don't think you as an audience deserve to be soft-pedaled on something just because I know someone in the real world.  When I wrote about "Fanboys," I knew I was possibly going to offend either Ernie or Kyle, and I figured that was just going to have to be the fallout, something I'd have to live with.

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<p>Mike Myers will return to his best-loved movie role with 'Austin Powers 4,' HitFix has exclusively confirmed.</p>

Mike Myers will return to his best-loved movie role with 'Austin Powers 4,' HitFix has exclusively confirmed.

Credit: New Line Cinema

Exclusive: Mike Myers is signed, sealed, delivered for 'Austin Powers 4'

Comic star returns to his best-loved movie role for a new sequel

It was inevitable.

Mike Myers had a small part in Quentin Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds," and he's reprised his role as Shrek for both a sequel and a TV special in the last few years, but as far as live-action movies where he's the star, the last one was the disastrous "The Love Guru" in 2008, and the response to that nearly drove him out of the business.

Myers is a very particular talent, a guy who likes to workshop a character for a while before he actually makes a movie.  He has not made that many films, all things considered, and a few times over the course of his career, he has actually pulled the plug on things that probably could have gotten made because he didn't feel they were ready.  That happened most famously with "Sprockets," the feature-film version of one of his SNL characters.  I liked the script he co-wrote with Mike McCullers, but Myers bowed out just before it was supposed to start, killing the film in the process.

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<p>Viola Davis and her husband Julius Tennon, seen here together outside a benefit screening of 'The Help,' will co-produce an adaptation of 'The Personal History of Rachel DuPree' for Davis to star in.</p>

Viola Davis and her husband Julius Tennon, seen here together outside a benefit screening of 'The Help,' will co-produce an adaptation of 'The Personal History of Rachel DuPree' for Davis to star in.

Credit: AP Photo/Rogello V. Solis

Viola Davis set to produce and star in 'Personal History Of Rachel Dupree'

Star of the oddly-controversial 'The Help' has her eye on personal project

It's been interesting watching the reaction to "The Help" this week.  The movie, like the best-selling novel that spawned it, is a big slick slice of cheese anchored by some very strong performances, and I liked it well enough when I reviewed it.

I've been told repeatedly, both directly and through the media, though, that it is inappropriate to like the movie, and that it is insulting to both the reality of the civil rights movement and to the performers that are asked to play the maids in the film.  I've been told that these stories are only valid if told by black filmmakers.  Never mind that most young black filmmakers today have as much direct experience of the South of the '60s as I do… skin color is obviously the primary qualifier for what stories we are allowed to tell, right?

I think the entire debate is wrong-headed, frankly.  I think any time people start telling other people what stories they can or can't tell, it's ridiculous.  Do I think there is a long history of telling significant stories about other cultures or ethnicity through a white American filter?  Sure.  Absolutely.  I think when you make a film like "Ghost Of Mississippi" about a real-life figure as remarkable as Medgar Evers and you tell it from the POV of a white lawyer, you have made a disastrous creative choice.  I think when you make a film about Stephen Biko and you spend most of the running time dealing with the struggles of a white family to escape South Africa, you have missed the point. 

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<p>Nic Cage and Nic Kidman in 'A Tale Of Two Nics'... er, wait... no... it's called 'Trespass'.&nbsp; My bad.</p>

Nic Cage and Nic Kidman in 'A Tale Of Two Nics'... er, wait... no... it's called 'Trespass'.  My bad.

Credit: Millennium Films

What is Joel Schumacher's 'Trespass' and why is it going direct-to-video?

Is this where the business is heading, or just a bad film looking for a release?

There is little doubt that the distribution model has changed for Hollywood in the last decade, and it's going to continue to change over the next decade.  And I'm not just talking about the ancillary markets, either, where physical media and digital downloads are currently battling it out for supremacy.  The theatrical market, once considered chuch-and-state separate from home video dates, is starting to become a very expensive part of the marketing campaign for many movies, with producers counting on the afterlife for a film instead of thinking as the theatrical release as the film's primary moment.

Joel Schumacher had a moment when he was one of Hollywood's A-list directors, but that moment has passed, and these days, he is struggling to get attention with his new films, and he has crossed a line and become one of those guys whose films get treated like an embarrassment, snuck into release.  "Blood Creek," his Nazi-themed horror film, barely even registered, and the same was true of "Twelve," his teens-on-designer-drugs movie that was laughed at heartily at Sundance.  His last wide release was "The Number 23" in 2007, and that film died a horrible, bloody death at the box office.

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<p>Julianne Hough and Kenny Wormald co-star in Craig Brewer's remake of 'Footloose'</p>

Julianne Hough and Kenny Wormald co-star in Craig Brewer's remake of 'Footloose'

Credit: Paramount

Watch: New 'Footloose' trailer promises big drama, bigger dancing

Craig Brewer's new take on the '80s classic is looking better and better

When I posted my piece the other day about "Footloose," I referred to the film as a musical, and Craig Brewer actually showed up in our comments section to clarify that this is not a film where people burst into song.  By that strict definition, it's not a musical, it's a dance film.

But music is obviously a huge part of the movie, both in design and in the way it'll be sold, and the new trailer that arrived online today is cut to a very spare reworking of the original Kenny Loggins theme for the first film, and it's a really effective look at what Brewer's put together.

One of the things that makes me think this is going to be more than just an empty cash grab is listening to Brewer talk about the subtext that made him want to remake the film in the first place.  We live in a reactionary time, and I think it's clear to anyone who lived through 9/11 and the way things changed afterward that all it takes is a push, and America is ready to overreact, especially when it's in the name of "the children."

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<p>Too hot for sweaters in Vegas </p>

Too hot for sweaters in Vegas

Watch: Anton Yelchin and David Tennant talk vampires in new clips from 'Fright Night'

Looks like 'Dr. Who' has a drinking problem

With "Final Destination 5" opening today and "Fright Night" next week, horror-comedy fans are really getting a double dose of a genre that's been sorely neglected of late.

Sure, we've seen it here and there when Raimi threw us a bone with "Drag Me To Hell" and of course there's "Scream 4" sequel. But in general, Wes Craven's stuff has been funny for the wrong reasons lately, so that doesn't count.

Witness these four clips from next week's 3D remake of "Fright Night." The original is a shinning example of campy 80's horror-comedy innocence. It's now been updated for our more brutal century by director Craig Gillespie.

Click through to see the how the characters have changed in the new version.

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<p>The JFK&nbsp;assassination is one of the most famous moments in 20th Century American history, and the subject of Stephen King's new book which Jonathan Demme will adapt as a movie.</p>

The JFK assassination is one of the most famous moments in 20th Century American history, and the subject of Stephen King's new book which Jonathan Demme will adapt as a movie.

Credit: LIFE Images

Jonathan Demme will save JFK for film version of Stephen King's '11/22/63'

The second big King announcement this week is promising

It appears to be a big week at the Stephen King compound.

We put up the story last night about David Yates and Steve Kloves working together again on a new multi-film adaptation of "The Stand," and now it looks like another King property has been snapped up by a very promising filmmaker.  This time, it's an unpublished piece of work, and it's one of the few filmmakers to ever earn the Best Picture Oscar with what can only be described as a horror film.

Promising, eh?

Jonathan Demme is set to write, direct, and produce the film adaptation of "11/22/63," which doesn't hit shelves until November 8 of this year.  I'm not surprised that it sold, or that it's a boomer director who will be making the film.  At this point, I've accepted the fact that there is an entire generation of filmmakers who will continue to push the cultural supremacy of the '60s on us until every last one of them has died.  And with this particular project, King basically laid out the greatest bait imaginable for that generation, a high-concept exercise in wish fulfillment that sounds like it was almost scientifically targeted to get turned into a movie.

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<p>Ayrton Senna was one of the greats in Formula One history, and the new documentary 'Senna' looks at his life and his too-short career</p>

Ayrton Senna was one of the greats in Formula One history, and the new documentary 'Senna' looks at his life and his too-short career

Credit: Producers Distribution Agency

Review: 'Senna' is riveting, emotional celebration of great Formula One racer

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Intense and well-researched, this is one of the year's best documentaries

The ESPN series "30 For 30" has produced some remarkable films, so I know that ESPN is a force to be reckoned with in terms of documentary production.  Seeing their logo on the front of this one, along with Universal and Working Title, I figured on something slick, an advertisement for Formula One racing from the perspective of one of the sport's legends.  Instead, it is an acutely felt and emotional movie, an exceptional personal portrait of one of the guys who defined the sport during one of its key turning points.  It is also a sad reminder of just what the stakes are for these guys each and every time they get behind the wheel.

There are different schools of documentary filmmaking, and the two docs I'm reviewing today are both examples of the type that is built from existing footage.  In this case, director Asif Kapadia is working as a sort of filter, the one who went through mountains of footage from over the years, gradually picking and choosing the bits and pieces that offer up the narrative he's trying to tell.  You've got to have an editor's instincts to be good at this, and Kapadia has a knack for cutting dramatic scenes out of this footage, finding the small human details that really tell the story, avoiding narration and simply letting people tell their own story.  Working with writer Manish Pandey, he has managed to paint a riveting portrait of one driven man and the course of his career without simply making it a greatest hits collection.

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