<p>'The Oranges' makes good use of its ensemble cast and wins some big laughs as a result</p>

'The Oranges' makes good use of its ensemble cast and wins some big laughs as a result

Credit: Likely Story/Olympus Pictures

Review: Hugh Laurie and Leighton Meester headline sharp suburban comedy 'The Oranges'

HitFix
B+
Readers
A+
Great ensemble cast finds big laughs in 'American Beauty' country

The notion of suburban malaise is nothing new, and it's been well-mined in plenty of novels and movies and TV shows already.  Wisely, "The Oranges" is not trying to blow the lid off the notion that marriages sometimes crumble or that suburbia frequently hides secrets behind its white picket fences. 

Instead, the script by Jay Reiss and Ian Helfer is a no-apologies comedy, and it gives the large ensemble cast some juicy material to play, allowing them to really run wild.  Director Julian Farino, making his feature debut, has a great sense of character and timing, and the result is a movie that some distributor is going to make good money with, as long as they cut the right trailer.

After all, look at their cast.  You've got Hugh Laurie, Catherine Keener, Oliver Platt, Allison Janney, Leighton Meester, Alia Shawkat, and Adam Brody, and they're all very good in the film.  It's a true ensemble comedy, too.  Shawkat's character Vanessa is the narrator of the film and the daughter of David (Laurie) and Paige (Keener).  They live across the street from their best friends, Carol (Janney) and Terry (Platt), and their kids all grew up together.  They do everything as a group, and at the start of the film, Vanessa talks about how she has two families.  She used to be just as tight with Nina, the daughter of Carol and Terry, but Nina wanted to see the world, and as soon as she could leave West Orange, New Jersey, she did, and she never looked back.  Vanessa is one of those people who wants a career and a life, but is held back by fear and inertia, and so her resentment of Nina is very specific.  It's not just that they fell out as friends; Nina is living the life Vanessa wanted, but could never really manage.

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 First Look: 'Attack the Block' home video release and box art

First Look: 'Attack the Block' home video release and box art

Joe Cornish's inventive alien invasion can now be see by even more people

Sony announced the DVD and Blu-Ray release of the little movie that could, "Attack the Block." and were nice enough to send HitFix a first look at the box and some details about the extras as well as a good idea on how they're going to market it.

 

The inner city Alien invasion movie features a group of rough and tumble teenagers who find themselves deending their housing project from an invasion of jet black aliens, as well as maneuvering their way around other dangers such as drug dealers and the police.

 

In an interesting departure from the early days (March of this year) in which the thick working class london accents and slang of the main characters was thought to be a major barrier to releasing the film in the US, it now looks as if they are embracing said accent as an asset instead of a liability.

 

From the press release:

 

“It’s an alien invasion, bruv – believe it” and it’s coming to you from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.  “Trust, fam!” 

 

Awesome.

 

Click through for DVD details and box art.

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<p>Gerard Butler is fighting the urge to bellow 'THIS... IS...&nbsp;AFRICA!' with every fiber of his being.</p>

Gerard Butler is fighting the urge to bellow 'THIS... IS... AFRICA!' with every fiber of his being.

Credit: Relativity Media

Review: Gerard Butler headlines the strange and overly sincere 'Machine Gun Preacher'

HitFix
C
Readers
B+
Based on a true story film means well, but that's just not enough

What a weird movie.

Have you ever seen or heard of the movie "The Cross and the Switchblade" with Pat Boone starring in it?  Total Godsploitation.  It's about a hip young priest reaching out to some inner-city gang hoods and winning them over with some tough-talking Bible study and a few well-applied fists.  It's based on a true story by a guy named David Wilkerson, and I couldn't help but think of that film when I was watching Marc Forster's new film "Machine Gun Preacher."  Like that one, this is based on a true story, and like that one, it seems to want to be an exciting, violent movie that is ultimately about faith.  That's just such a weird hybrid of goals that I have trouble getting a handle on tone, a problem that Forster seems to share.

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<p>Anna Kendrick tries to help Joseph Gordon-Levitt deal with the idea of dying young in '50/50'</p>

Anna Kendrick tries to help Joseph Gordon-Levitt deal with the idea of dying young in '50/50'

Credit: Summit Entertainment

Review: Seth Rogen and Joseph Gordon-Levitt star in affecting, understated '50/50'

HitFix
B+
Readers
n/a
True-life story makes for a simple, affecting film

Jonathan Levine's been working in a minor key so far as a filmmaker. 

His first film is the still unreleased "All The Boys Love Mandy Lane," a determined twist on slasher formula and iconography, and he followed that up with the coming-of-age story "The Wackness," and in both cases, I've got a solid case of like.  I think he's interesting, and it feels to me like he's warming up.  That's not an insult, either.  I think Rian Johnson is still warming up.  I like "Brick," and I really like "The Brothers Bloom," but those aren't the movies he'll be known for.  Those are still ahead.  He's a guy who is going to keep getting better.  You can see it in the way he grows from first to second film, and in the ambition of what he's doing.  Levine is that kind of filmmaker.  I look at his movies, and I can see that he's smart, that he thinks about what he's shooting, that there's a real heart in there.  Those movies are genuinely told, sincerely meant, and even if I don't love them, I like what they represent, a filmmaker who's working towards something.

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<p>This pretty much sums up Andrea Arnold's entire approach to adapting Bronte's classic novel 'Wuthering Heights'</p>

This pretty much sums up Andrea Arnold's entire approach to adapting Bronte's classic novel 'Wuthering Heights'

Credit: Film 4/HanWay Films

Review: Andrea Arnold's 'Wuthering Heights' is beautiful, but disappointing

HitFix
C
Readers
D
Dramatically inert, it's more of a photo exhibit than a film

Andrea Arnold has only made a few films so far, but both "Red Road" and "Fish Tank" demonstrate a clear sense of voice and style.  She's got a great visual sense, and she is very good at creating a sense of dramatic tension, drawn out in some cases to the point where it's almost unbearable.  I would have happily gone to see anything she brought to the festival this year, but the notion of her tackling a piece of material like "Wuthering Heights" was particularly appealing.  It seemed like a strong dramatic place for her to start, and I had no doubt she would find a way to make it her own.

Having now seen the film, I'm not surprised that the Venice Film Festival gave a special award to the cinematography by Robbie Ryan, who also shot her two previous films.  His work here is spectacular, and there is a tactile quality to the film that goes beyond anything 3D could offer.  The problem is that aside from the cinematography and that sensual quality it lends to the film, there's nothing else about "Wuthering Heights" that I can recommend.  You might as well re-title the picture "Andrea Arnold's Photography Exhibit On Themes From 'Wuthering Heights'," because this is a still life.  It's a non-motion picture.  It is dramatically inert, and almost baffling in the way it misses the mark.

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<p>Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen play dress-up in the oddly unsatisfying 'A Dangerous Method'</p>

Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen play dress-up in the oddly unsatisfying 'A Dangerous Method'

Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Review: David Cronenberg's oddly restrained 'A Dangerous Method' never quite connects

HitFix
C+
Readers
A+
For a film about the men who defined kink, the film lacks heat

David Cronenberg is one of my favorite directors of all time.  His body of work, and I use that word knowing full well it has a double meaning when you're referring to Cronenberg, is one of the most demanding and rigorously intellectual of anyone in any genre.  He has long been fascinated by the relationship we have with the bodies we occupy, and he successfully made the jump from overt horror to adult-minded drama, something not every filmmaker is able to accomplish.

Yes, Wes Craven, we all still remember "Music Of The Heart."

When Cronenberg signed on for "A Dangerous Method," it sounded like a perfect match between filmmaker and material.  After all, Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung were two of the men who helped define the vocabulary we still use to discuss sexual psychology, and Cronenerg is, after all, the guy who made "Crash."  Not the silly "racism is bad" one, but the "hey, I could always use that hole" version.  This is a man who knows kink.  This is a man who has pushed boundaries so hard they've crumbled.  Who else would think to put a VHS-eating vagina in James Woods's chest?  I walked into "A Dangerous Method" wide open and ready for anything.

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<p>Oh, sure, he's just relaxing here, but give this man a hammer, and suddenly 'Drive' becomes flat-out terrifying</p>

Oh, sure, he's just relaxing here, but give this man a hammer, and suddenly 'Drive' becomes flat-out terrifying

Credit: Film District

Review: Ryan Gosling cranks up the cool in Refn's remarkable thriller 'Drive'

HitFix
A-
Readers
A
Plus Albert Brooks is scary... who knew?

Nicolas Winding Refn seems like an unlikely artist to be the guy who is making a career for himself as the pre-eminent bard of movie machismo, but that appears to be the case. 

His "Pusher" trilogy is a marvel of soap opera plotting and bad guy behavior, and he made Kim Bodina feel like the world's greatest unknown movie star, a Danish Tony Soprano.  His film "Bleeder" is about the rejection of comfort and love, with violence shown to be this seductive, necessary piece of some people's chemical make-up.  His big breakthrough moment seemed to be "Bronson," which I reviewed in the very early days of this site, and that movie is all about transforming yourself into a giant battle-hardened beast and then punching your way through life.  "Drive" is, aesthetically speaking, an early Michael Mann movie.  It's a small doomed little character piece, with Ryan Gosling giving a great movie star performance, self-aware and stylized to an extreme. 

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<p>Joel Murray and Tara Lynne Barr raise some serious hell in Bobcat Goldthwait's primal scream of a movie, 'God Bless America'</p>

Joel Murray and Tara Lynne Barr raise some serious hell in Bobcat Goldthwait's primal scream of a movie, 'God Bless America'

Credit: Darko Entertainment

Review: Bobcat Goldthwait opens fire with 'God Bless America'

HitFix
B+
Readers
A-
An angry cry for kindness spattered in blood and wrapped in filth

Bobcat Goldthwait referred to himself as "that guy from 'Police Academy'" onstage tonight after the premiere of his latest film as a writer/director, "God Bless America," and it's interesting to see just how he's developed as a comic voice in the nearly thirty years I've been aware of him.

If you weren't a big stand-up comedy nerd back in the '80s, maybe you don't know what the landscape was like.  There was an explosion of venues coast-to-coast, and as a result, there was suddenly a glut of stand-up comedy.  The new American Dream was suddenly "write a good stand-up set, get on Carson, get your own sitcom, make a mint, and win."  And much of that stand-up was the same, totally homogenized observational crap that sounded like it came from the same awful jokebook.  The guys who broke through, who really stood out, were guys who came at it from their own particular angle, who had a unique voice.  And if there's one thing you can say about Bobcat Goldthwait, he absolutely had a unique voice.

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<p>U2 rehearses new arrangements of the songs from 'Achtung Baby' during the making of the documentary 'From The Sky Down'</p>

U2 rehearses new arrangements of the songs from 'Achtung Baby' during the making of the documentary 'From The Sky Down'

Credit: Showtime

Review: 'From The Sky Down' offers intimate look at U2 recording 'Achtung Baby'

HitFix
B
Readers
n/a
Director of 'It Might Get Loud' does solid job with artistic retrospective

I distinctly remember the release of "Achtung Baby."  I had not lived in Los Angeles for very long at that point, and I was still forming my groups of friends.  There was one guy in particular who was every bit the lunatic for music that I was for movies, and once we met at Dave's Video, where we both worked, we became fast friends.  While music has always been an important thing to me, it was almost always as background, as soundtrack to other things, and even the albums that were important to me were albums I soaked up by osmosis more than anything.

But on a night in mid-November, I found myself at Tower Records on Ventura, long gone now, waiting in a big line for the release of the first album in three years from one of my favorite bands.  I saw them live for the first time on the "Unforgettable Fire" tour when they played the Omni in Atlanta, and then I saw them again for "Joshua Tree."  I felt like they lost something moving from smaller venues into stadiums, and that second show had none of the intimacy that I found so riveting the first time I saw them.  I felt like the bombast of "Rattle & Hum" had led them in a rough direction artistically, and so I was curious to see if they could win me back over as a fan. 

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<p>Clive Owen and Jason Statham play a lightning round of Quien Es Mas Macho? in 'Killer Elite'</p>

Clive Owen and Jason Statham play a lightning round of Quien Es Mas Macho? in 'Killer Elite'

Credit: Open Road Films

Review: Jason Statham butts heads with Clive Owen in semi-successful 'Killer Elite'

HitFix
C+
Readers
n/a
'Based On A True Story' action movie stretches crediblity, but breaks bones with style

The only way you could make a Jason Statham movie more preposterously macho would be to add Clive Owen as the bad guy, right?  Well, if that sounds like heaven to you, prepare yourself for the battle of the glowering English thugs that is Gary McKendry's fitfully successful new action movie "Killer Elite."  It's not connected in any way to the James Caan/Robert Duvall movie "The Killer Elite" that Sam Peckinpah made, but it's exactly the sort of story that I could see Peckinpah getting interested in.  Guys and their complicated moral codes, the way loyalty drives people to extremes, the cost of violence over the course of a lifetime… all of these themes are present in the film written by McKendry and Matt Sherring based on the novel "The Feather Men" by Ranulph Fiennes.

The book was a nonfiction account of a vigilante group in England in the '60s that solved crimes that the police ignored.  There was a particular crime that they spent 14 years trying to solve, and that crime is the lynchpin that McKendry built his movie around.  I'm not sure how much of the book is true or not true, but I'm going to guess that the film has largely fictionalized things while trying to also use that whole "based on a true story" thing has part of the hook of the film.  Too much of this is too thematically constructed, too neat and perfect and planned out, and that's fine when it's a drama.  As a "true story," though, "Killer Elite" stretches credibility pretty far, and it's one of those movies where I'm not completely sure I can recommend it.

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