<p>Nash Edgerton's new short film 'Bear' will be playing at SXSW this year, but we spoke to him about it at Sundance.</p>

Nash Edgerton's new short film 'Bear' will be playing at SXSW this year, but we spoke to him about it at Sundance.

Credit: HitFix

SXSW: Director Nash Edgerton talks about 'Bear' and Baz Luhrmann's 'Great Gatsby'

One of the most ingenious short filmmakers today shares tricks of the trade

One day, the Edgerton brothers will rule Hollywood with an iron fist, and I for one welcome our new Edgerton overlords.

Joel Edgerton, of course, is working hard in front of the camera these days, and he's managed to finally make the jump to Hollywood leading man.  I am enormously fond of the work he did last year in "Warrior," and while I didn't love everything about "Wish You Were Here" at Sundance, Edgerton is great in it.  There's something about the new breed of Australian leading men that really sets them apart from the gym-trained oh-so-smooth LA brand of guy, something more genuine and rough-hewn.  It's little wonder so many of them are making the jump to action hero these days.

The other Edgerton, though, is the one that needs to have his turn in the spotlight, and I am convinced that day is coming.  His short film "Spider" is one of those that you never forget after you've seen it, and every single time I show it to people, I love watching them as they watch it.  The same is true of his latest film "Bear," and I'm excited that it's screening at SXSW.

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<p>Willem Dafoe is a river to his people... or his Tharks, rather... in the new fantasy adventure 'John Carter'</p>

Willem Dafoe is a river to his people... or his Tharks, rather... in the new fantasy adventure 'John Carter'

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Willem Dafoe and Lynn Collins share memories of Barsoom and 'John Carter'

Two of the most memorable actors in the new epic adventure discuss their roles

By far, the two performances I think people will speak about most frequently when they discuss "John Carter" are given by Willem Dafoe and Lynn Collins.

When I joined the cast at the Boulders resort in Carefree, Arizona, I started my day with an interview with Willem Dafoe.  He was the first person from the film that I spoke to after our screening the night before, and he turned out to be a real pleasure.  I've been watching and admiring his work since "To Live And Die In LA," and I think he's only gotten better with age.  He is one of those actors who brings such a unique and intense presence to everything he does that it's a thrill to sit down with him finally.  I only wish it could have been longer.

With Lynn Collins, I'll confess to being one of the people that was skeptical about the casting of her as Dejah Thoris when it was first announced.  I only really knew her from "Wolverine," and that's a hard film for anyone to use as a calling card.  In "John Carter," though, I think Collins proves herself to be a strong, sexy, and smart lead actress.  She infuses the role with qualities that I'm not sure existed on the page, even in the Burroughs version, but that feel absolutely right.

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<p>Taylor Kitsch seems happy to be having one of those years that actors dream about, and we discussed that as part of the press day for this weekend's new release, 'John Carter'</p>

Taylor Kitsch seems happy to be having one of those years that actors dream about, and we discussed that as part of the press day for this weekend's new release, 'John Carter'

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Taylor Kitsch and Dominic West represent good and bad in 'John Carter'

We chat with the hero and the villain of this science-fantasy adventure

"John Carter" comes out this weekend, so you know what that means?  If you answered "Lots of 'John Carter' interviews," then you win, and as your prize, you get… well, lots of "John Carter" interviews, actually.

What better way to kick off our coverage of the film than with John Carter himself?  I went to Carefree, Arizona to not only see the film but to talk to the team who made it, and obviously, part of that day consisted of sitting down with Taylor Kitsch, on whose shoulders much of the film rests.  This is a major year for Kitsch, and if anyone's being given a shot at new movie stardom this year, it's him.  After all, he's the star of this, then he's the star of "Battleship," which will be one of the summer's biggest films in terms of scale if nothing else, and then later in the summer, he's one of the stars of Oliver Stone's adaptation of Don Winslow's "Savages."  That's a pretty big line-up, and I'm curious to see where Kitsch stands at the end of the year.

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<p>Darth Vader attempts to locate a Rebel spy onboard a shuttle during Disneyland's 'Star Tours' ride</p>

Darth Vader attempts to locate a Rebel spy onboard a shuttle during Disneyland's 'Star Tours' ride

Credit: Disneyland/Lucasfilm, Ltd.

One Thing I Love Today: The new 'Star Tours' is more transporting than expected

Disney did more than just update the ride to make the ride brand-new again

I am not what you would call a Disney nerd.  At least, not compared to the truly hardcore.  However, I think it's safe to say that Disney's various parks have always been part of my life.

I grew up in Florida, and many of my formative memories come from time spent at Walt Disney World.  I remember spending the Bicentennial there, I have crazy stories to tell about my Grad Nite, and I probably went to the park somewhere between 50 and 100 times between the ages of 3 and 20.

When I left Florida, I also left behind the Disney habit.  I know adults who adore Disney and who spend a lot of time and money there each year, and I don't begrudge anyone the pure enjoyment of it.  I admit I had a really snotty attitude about Disneyland when I moved to California, so that made it easy to break the habit.  After all, you could take every square inch of the property in California and put it in the parking lot of Florida's Magic Kingdom.  The scale of the Florida property is amazing, and that's what I was used to.  Over time, I've come to really love Disneyland for the history and for the charm of the place.  It's a very different experience than the Florida version, and I appreciate that.

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<p>Jason Segel sat down with HitFix to talk about why he's not part of the development of the 'Muppets' sequel</p>

Jason Segel sat down with HitFix to talk about why he's not part of the development of the 'Muppets' sequel

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Jason Segel on why he's not returning for a 'Muppets' sequel

The franchise is in good hands

Last week, the news broke that Jason Segel was not one of the writers hired to develop a sequel to "The Muppets."

True, it was his frequent collaborator Nicholas Stoller who was hired, but just the notion that Segel might not be a driving force on a sequel seemed to upset some people.  I thought it was probably not as big a deal as it was made out to be, and I said so, but I thought it would make sense to talk directly to Segel about it.

So on Saturday, one of the two press days I was at was for "Jeff, Who Lives At Home," the marvelous new comedy from Jay and Mark Duplass, and one of the interviews I had scheduled was Jason Segel.  Why not kick things off by asking him to directly address the situation?

"I did what I set out to do."  That's really all the answer he needs to give, and I think it's important to note just how happy he is with the film and what a miracle the film is at all.  There were many points during development when it easily could have died, and there were most likely points where Segel must have felt worn down by it.  Even after they filmed it, when they were in post and I spoke to him about it on the set of "The Five-Year Engagement," he was cautiously optimistic, thinking that they'd done something he liked but still unsure what was going to happen with people accepting what they'd done.

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<p>Will Smith and Josh Brolin star in 'Men In Black 3,' and it may be the mission that finally ends the franchise</p>

Will Smith and Josh Brolin star in 'Men In Black 3,' and it may be the mission that finally ends the franchise

Credit: Sony Pictures

New 'Men In Black 3' trailer feels overly familiar and really expensive

HitFix
C+
Readers
B
Plus Will Smith takes to Yahoo! to explain the movie to fans

I don't think the new "Men In Black III" trailer looks any worse than many big anonymous blockbusters, but I'll be honest… word on this one has been troubling so far, and this new trailer doesn't really assuage those fears.

I've heard some remarkable figures tossed around as the final budget for this film, while I'm also hearing it runs under 90 minutes.  I'd love to know if this is the new winner for "most expensive film per minute," but I'm guessing we'll never really get an official figure on how much it's going to cost Sony to get it into theaters.  What I'm curious about is who the audience is.  Sure, the first two films were blockbusters, but the second one was not particularly well-liked, and I haven't sensed any real anticipation from anyone I've spoken with.

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<p>Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum go undercover in the patently absurd and highly enjoyable '21 Jump Street'</p>

Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum go undercover in the patently absurd and highly enjoyable '21 Jump Street'

Credit: Sony Pictures

Review: '21 Jump Street' is arresting comedy vehicle for Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum

HitFix
A+
Readers
B+
A film that shouldn't work at all turns out to be a great spring surprise

There is no need for a "21 Jump Street" movie.

You could say that about much of what Hollywood makes these days, but I remember when the original TV show was on the air, and "21 Jump Street" was, at best, a sort of goofy early attempt by Fox to define itself as a network.  It was most notable for being a launch pad for Johnny Depp, and I would argue that no one has spent the time since it went off the air mourning and praying for a resurrection.

What makes the new feature film version of the show, written by Michael Bacall and directed by Phil Lord and Chris Miller, such a wonderful surprise is that it both overtly acknowledges how frequently awful it is for Hollywood to trade on shameless pre-packaged nostalgia while turning the original into something new with a voice all its own.  The story was co-written by Bacall and Jonah Hill, and it acknowledges the absurdity of its own premise even as it leans full-tilt into that absurdity, making it work.

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<p>You would think young people would eventually learn not to go to remote cabins in the woods for parties, but if they did, then we wouldn't have the wicked fun of 'Cabin In The Woods' to look forward to this spring.</p>

You would think young people would eventually learn not to go to remote cabins in the woods for parties, but if they did, then we wouldn't have the wicked fun of 'Cabin In The Woods' to look forward to this spring.

Credit: Lionsgate

SXSW: Want to discuss 'Cabin In The Woods' with Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard?

Full details on the event I'll be moderating next Sunday and where you'll see it

South by Southwest Film Festival is not afraid to put me to work.

And, frankly, there are few festivals I would bend over backwards more aggressively to help.  I have come to really love SXSW over the last five years or so, and I think the work that Janet Pierson and her amazing team of programmers and publicists have done to really focus and emphasize the identity of the fest has paid off handsomely.

This year, you'll probably see my face if you're attending lots of midnight screenings, and as I announced a week or two ago, I'll be moderating a panel on the bizarre new sitcom "Holliston" that will be appearing on FEARNet.  We've held off on the last big announcement until now, though, and honestly, if there's any one thing I'm most excited about doing at the fest this year, this is it.

On Sunday, March 11, I'm going to moderating a live-chat with Joss Whedon and Drew Godard, the big-brained lunatics behind "Cabin In The Woods."  I can't publish my review of this one until it premieres at the fest, but suffice it to say, I am a fan.  I think it's smart and fun and, more than anything, makes a great case for why we all need a little red meat in our cinematic diet.  I am excited for people to get a look at the film, but more than that, I'm thrilled that I'm going to get to serve as the moderator for what I hope should be a freewheeling dialogue between these guys and the audience.

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<p>The Tusken Raiders were just one of the many elements of 'Star Wars' influenced by the remarkable vision of Ralph McQuarrie, who passed away today at the age of 82</p>

The Tusken Raiders were just one of the many elements of 'Star Wars' influenced by the remarkable vision of Ralph McQuarrie, who passed away today at the age of 82

Credit: Lucasfilm Ltd.

Ralph McQuarrie, visual designer of 'Star Wars,' passes away at 82

We look back at one of the industry's greatest illustrators

Ralph McQuarrie is probably more directly responsible for the texture of my dream life between the ages of 7 and 13 than any other visual artist.  Simply put, the choices he made regarding the design of the world of "Star Wars" were one of the main reasons that film resonated not just with me, but with generations of viewers now.

There was a time when people ended up in the film industry after living other lives, after learning other skills, after working at a trade.  Ralph McQuarrie was a technical illustrator working for Boeing, and that led him to working on animated coverage of NASA's Apollo missions for CBS News.  He sort of backed into the film industry through that work, which caught the attention of Hal Barwood and Matthew Robbins, who were part of the same circle of friends that included other young filmmakers like Steven Spielberg, Brian De Palma, and George Lucas.

It was 1975 when McQuarrie was first hired by Lucas to create some paintings that would help people make sense of the script he was writing at the time.  Those paintings, many of which are now iconic, not only helped pin down the designs of characters like Chewbacca and Darth Vader, but also were a big part of what convinced 20th Century Fox to make the movie. 

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<p>What is good in life?&nbsp; Being part of the Alamo Drafhouse special Summer of '82 screening series and presenting our very own screening of 'Conan The Barbarian,' that's what.</p>

What is good in life?  Being part of the Alamo Drafhouse special Summer of '82 screening series and presenting our very own screening of 'Conan The Barbarian,' that's what.

Credit: Universal Home Video

The Alamo Drafthouse is celebrating the Summer of 1982 as only they can

Find out which screening we're hosting and what you'll see

In many ways, the Summer of 1982 is the reason I am a film critic today.

After all, that was the summer I learned conclusively that I do not always agree with the herd, either critically or commercially, and there were films that were important to me that year, films I believed with my whole heart were great films, that came out and tanked completely.  At the time, I felt like I was out there on my own regarding these movies, and it was only later, after time had passed, that people came around and the films began to grow in reputation.  I believe that time has ultimately sided with me on these films, and now "Blade Runner" and "The Thing" are considered classics of their genre, but at the time of release, these were not movies that garnered any easy acclaim.

Five years ago, I was still working for Ain't It Cool News, and I decided I wanted to run a series of articles on the site celebrating the 25th anniversary of what I consider the greatest single genre year of my life.  I recruited some of the other writers from the site and asked them to write about the movies that mattered to them that year.  Nordling's piece about "E.T" won him a piece of handwritten fan mail from none other than Steven Spielberg.  Harry wrote up "Tron," one of his favorite movies.  My writing partner Scott Swan put together a look back at "Creepshow."  We covered "Poltergeist," "Porky's," "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," "The Last American Virgin," "The Secret Of Nimh," "The Dark Crystal" and more.  It was one of those series that made me enormously proud, and I still think of it as a high watermark for the site.

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