Review: Argentine dark comedy 'Relatos Salvajes' is dazzling and wicked
Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Review: Argentine dark comedy 'Relatos Salvajes' is dazzling and wicked

HitFix
A+
Readers
n/a
Damian Szifron, it's nice to meet you

CANNES -- As I was standing in line last night outside the Salle Debussy, it was obvious that things were out of the control of the people running the festival. For those unfamiliar with the way badge hierarchy works at these events, Cannes has a carefully segregated caste system. If you have a white badge or a pink badge, the world is your oyster. You are able to walk in first, and you are given your choice of location. If you have a blue badge, you have to wait until white and pink have all been seated. And then beyond that, there are at least two more colors that have to wait even longer, and there's a good chance many of those people don't even make it inside.

I'm rocking a blue badge this year, somewhere in the middle of the pecking order, which means I need to spend some extra time in line if I want to try to guarantee myself a seat. The line for "Relatos Salvajes" was unusually long by the time I arrived, though, and it took me a moment to find the end of it amidst the crowd that's always gathered in front of the Palais. There was no clearly marked space, though, and people with every color badge started to pile in from the sides, creating more of a mob than a line, and as they started letting in, things got volatile very quickly. I saw people forcing their way in ahead of people who had been waiting, and within moments, I started to worry that I genuinely wouldn't get a seat.

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Review: Robert Pattinson and Guy Pearce sizzle, but slow-moving 'Rover' still disappoints
Credit: FilmNation

Review: Robert Pattinson and Guy Pearce sizzle, but slow-moving 'Rover' still disappoints

HitFix
C+
Readers
n/a
This the way the world ends, not with a bang but a yawn

CANNES - David Michod's "Animal Kingdom" was a venal little crime drama with strong, unsparing character work, and it garnered him international attention, with Jacki Weaver eventually landing an Academy Award nomination for playing a mother who was only slightly less terrifying than the Alien Queen. Little wonder he was able to attract some big names to his new film, "The Rover," which is making its premiere as part of this year's Cannes Film Festival.

It's been programmed as part of the Midnights section here at Cannes, but I would imagine any audience coming off of a long day of screenings who tries to actually sit through this at the tail end of their day is going to find themselves struggling. Glacially paced and intentionally minimalistic, "The Rover" tells the story of how a man living in Australia ten years after "the collapse" hunts down the men who took his car. That's it. That's the entire narrative arc of the film, and while there are other characters and certain events that serve as digressions, it all eventually comes down to a man pursuing some other men because they took his car and he wants it back, and while there are some very strong performances in the film, the movie is inert, dramatically speaking, and covers such familiar ground that I can't really recommend it.

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<p>By far, this is still my favorite Duran Duran album cover. Boy, the &#39;80s were fun.</p>

By far, this is still my favorite Duran Duran album cover. Boy, the '80s were fun.

Credit: Gabriel Polsky Productions

Review: 'Red Army' offers up a smart and funny documentary about Cold War hockey

HitFix
B+
Readers
n/a
Yeah, I wouldn't have picked this one as a laugh-fest, either

CANNES -- When I was a kid, the Soviet Union was the source of many long nights worth of nuclear nightmares, the Communist empire that we were warned would be coming for us one day. They were The Enemy, and we were indoctrinated with an infantile form of geopolitics, Us Vs Them. The Cold War was a constant presence, drilled into us from the moment we were old enough to understand the basics of "There are bad guys, and they want to kill you." Even today, when I talk to people my age who never shook that programming off, I am amazed how well they drilled that message into us, and how pervasively ugly it was.

As much as there were financial and political issues in play, the ideological war of Communism Vs Democracy was the biggest thing they tried to teach us. Never mind that they weren't technically communists and we're not technically a democracy. It made for a compelling narrative, and it seemed to motivate any number of advances for both nations. One particular triumph on the Soviet side involved their hockey program, and the film "Red Army" tells the story of how that happened.

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Chris Pratt calls 'Guardians Of The Galaxy' 'mind-blowing' from the London set

Chris Pratt calls 'Guardians Of The Galaxy' 'mind-blowing' from the London set

This is just the start of our coverage on this one

There are so many things I want to tell you about the time I spent in London on the set of "Guardians Of The Galaxy."

Today, though, we're still embargoed on the vast majority of it, and so we're going to focus on one of the interviews that we conducted as a group. Seems like Chris Pratt's a good place to start in any conversation about this film, since this will be the biggest film role he's ever had, and much of the success of the film hinges on how the audience takes to him as Peter Quill aka Star Lord.

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Review: 'How To Train Your Dragon 2' soars above most Hollywood franchise films
Credit: 20th Century Fox/Dreamworks Animation

Review: 'How To Train Your Dragon 2' soars above most Hollywood franchise films

HitFix
A
Readers
n/a
How did they make it look so easy?

CANNES -- Before the screening of "How To Train Your Dragon 2" started, there was a special trailer that was put together just for this event, celebrating 20 years of DreamWorks Animation bringing movies to Cannes to premiere.

What I found most impressive about it is how they managed to make even the films I really enjoyed from their studio look terrible by emphasizing the loud, the coarse, the most obvious of the jokes. It played more like a threat than a celebration, and it makes me wonder… is this what DreamWorks thinks works best with their films? Is this what they want every one of their movies to look like?

If so, the "How To Train Your Dragon" series must drive them crazy.

With this second film in the series, Dean DeBlois (who both wrote and directed the movie) has turned this into the most exciting overall property that DreamWorks has, live-action or animated. The film has an immediate confidence, and they don't spend much time trying to explain the first film. This is a sequel that has its own story to tell and that gets right down to it, and it expands on the ideas from the first film, but in a way that tells a thematically satisfying and complete story. In other words, this is how franchises are supposed to work.

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Review: Atom Egoyan's kidnapping drama 'Captive' is arch and ridiculous
Credit: eOne Films International

Review: Atom Egoyan's kidnapping drama 'Captive' is arch and ridiculous

HitFix
D
Readers
n/a
'Prisoners' doesn't have anything to worry about

CANNES -- It's hard to know where to start when analyzing what went wrong with a film as preposterous and phony as Atom Egoyan's "The Captive," a kidnapping drama that kicked off the first Friday of this year's Cannes Film Festival.

Egoyan is a frustrating filmmaker these days. In the early part of his career, his work was distinguished by a chilly, clinical style and a fascination with perspective. "Next Of Kin," "Family Viewing," and "Speaking Parts" all displayed enormous promise, and he hit his stride with films like "Exotica" and "The Sweet Hereafter." Lately, though, his films feel half-baked, increasingly distanced from any recognizable human behavior, and with "Devil's Knot," his dramatic take on the story of the West Memphis Three, it felt to me like he'd gone completely off the rails as a storyteller. I couldn't even figure out what point he thought he was making with the material that had already been so thoroughly (and expertly) mined by documentarians.

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Harrison Ford is offered the 'Blade Runner 2' job via public press release
Credit: Warner Bros

Harrison Ford is offered the 'Blade Runner 2' job via public press release

What a strange way for Alcon Entertainment to handle this

By far, the press released that was sent out today by Alcon Entertainment is one of the strangest I've ever seen.

"Warner Bros-based Alcon Entertainment… has an offer out to Harrison Ford to reprise his celebrated role of Rick Deckard in its Ridley Scott-directed sequel to 'Blade Runner."

There's more in the release about the script by Hampton Fancher and Michael Green and how excited the producers are and how important it is for Harrison to return to the role, but I'm still just trying to wrap my head around the idea of sending out an official statement to the press to celebrate the idea that you made an offer to an actor.

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Review: 'Party Girl' paints a bruised and beautiful portrait of a life in upheaval
Credit: Elzevir Films

Review: 'Party Girl' paints a bruised and beautiful portrait of a life in upheaval

HitFix
A
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Spare and unsentimental, this one hurts

CANNES -- Life is opportunity.

More than ever before, I believe that. I have to believe that. In just over a week, I turn 44, and I stand at the edge of some major upheavals in my life. It has taken me a longer time to reach this point than I would have liked, but I eventually realized that inertia is no way to live. I would rather confront the pain and the disappointment of sifting through the ashes of a marriage burnt to the ground than continue to simply drift along hoping for some miraculous change for the better. There is nothing more terrifying to me than change, and I feel like that's true for most of us. We accept the way things are and consign dreams of change to being just that… dreams. The courage it takes to affect real change is not something we come by easily, and fear of the unknown can be a powerful motivator to simply let life happen to us, as if we are incapable of control.

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<p>Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto will be back for &#39;Star Trek 3,&#39; so it&#39;s got that going for it.</p>

Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto will be back for 'Star Trek 3,' so it's got that going for it.

Credit: Paramount Pictures

We look at Paramount's big gamble on Robert Orci and 'Star Trek 3'

This is going to be a major test for one of the most successful working screenwriters

When Paramount held the first screening for "Star Trek Into Darkness," Robert Orci was one of the people who showed up to introduce the film, and during the Q&A afterwards, it was immediately clear that Orci wanted to be the director of the next film in the series. He treated it as a joke, but it didn't matter. The desire on his part was palpable, and I'm not remotely shocked to see that he's now been confirmed as the director.

So what does this mean? What is an all-Orci "Star Trek" going to look like?

To be honest, I'm not sure anyone can answer that question yet. The series itself is at a very strange place. While very few people seemed to be satisfied with the last film, it did leave things in a great place for a sequel because the crew has finally been sent away from Earth on their "five-year-mission," meaning pretty much anything is on the table for where they can go and what they can do. And Orci inherits a tremendous ensemble cast. I'm willing to admit that the reason I went easy on "Into Darkness" the first time around is because I just plain enjoy watching these people together.

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Review: 'X-Men: Days of Future Past' gives the franchise a new lease on life
Credit: 20th Century Fox

Review: 'X-Men: Days of Future Past' gives the franchise a new lease on life

HitFix
B+
Readers
A-
Singer's in fine form as he returns to the series he helped create

Over the last month, I've re-watched every entry in the series that Fox has produced since "X-Men" in 2000 as my kids worked their way through the films for the first time. What I found most interesting about the revisit is how my reactions to the films as they were being released and my reactions to them now aren't really the same. Each film was on a specific point in the larger continuity of comic book related movies, and the only way to judge them was how they stacked up to everything else that was being done in the genre at that time. Now, though, looking back at them all is illuminating, especially since it feels like "X-Men: Days Of Future Past" is the end of everything up to this point and the beginning of whatever comes next.

One thing has been very clear since this series began: while they are drawing on comic continuity for suggestions, they have not been bound by any particular rules of adaptation. In fact, they have almost exclusively altered things. I don't think you can point at any particular run of the series and see a direct correlation between what's onscreen and what was on the page. Sure, "X2" and "X-Men: The Last Stand" nodded to the "Dark Phoenix" storyline, but barely. I would find it a little ridiculous to actually call those films an adaptation because of how loosely they line up to the motivations or the characterizations of the books.

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