<p>Holy cow, the Klingons appear to be really out of focus in the still-untitled sequel to 2009's 'Star Trek' reboot</p>

Holy cow, the Klingons appear to be really out of focus in the still-untitled sequel to 2009's 'Star Trek' reboot

Credit: MTV/Viacom

Confirmed: JJ Abrams sneaks a Klingon into MTV Movie Awards

Hollywood's favorite secret-keeper hides a new villain in plain sight

In the last few days, I've been talking with a number of friends about "Prometheus," written in part by Damon Lindelof, and the careful campaign of secrecy that Fox and the filmmakers mounted while it was in production.

Obviously, Lindelof has some experience with working on something that he wants to keep secret, what with his time on "Lost" and his experiences working with JJ Abrams.  Right now, I'm enjoying the build-up to the still-untitled sequel to "Star Trek," if for no other reason than it seems to be driving the Internet crazy.

Abrams, of course, is the king of playing games with the Internet while he's in production on something, and so far, he's played things very close to the vest on "Star Trek 2."  Close enough that people still are arguing about whether or not Benedict Cumberbatch is playing Khan in the film, and close enough that there's still rampant speculation about whether or not he's going to include Klingons in the film.

Thanks to Abrams himself, though, that no longer appears to be a question.

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<p>Jason Schwartzman seemed more than happy to discuss his work in Wes Anderson's new film 'Moonrise Kingdom' when we caught up with the actor at the Cannes Film Festival</p>

Jason Schwartzman seemed more than happy to discuss his work in Wes Anderson's new film 'Moonrise Kingdom' when we caught up with the actor at the Cannes Film Festival

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Jason Schwartzman joins the kids to talk about 'Moonrise Kingdom'

Gilman and Hayward seem remarkably poised for teenagers

The second full day of the Cannes Film Festival was also the first day of the rain that marred much of the event this year.  I was unprepared for it, and so when I hurried from the 8:30 AM screening of "Reality" to the beachfront location where I was set to conduct my "Moonrise Kingdom" interviews, I was just barely ahead of an ominous cloud front and the first few strangled bursts of precipitation.

Because of the weather, everyone found themselves inside, waiting for the interviews, doing their best to stay dry.  I sat down at a table with James Rocchi, both of us working to write up "Reality" as we prepared for our time with the cast and with Anderson.  While we were sitting there working, Jason Schwartzman walked in.  They told him he'd have a half-hour until they needed him, so he dropped into a chair at the same table as Rocchi and me and just started chatting movies.

One of the things I've noticed about Schwartzman over the years is that he is ridiculously approachable, and he has a genuine curiosity about what other people think of things.  He wanted to hear about movies Rocchi and I had been seeing, and about what we were looking forward to, and then he and James moved on to a conversation about the Canadian band Sloan.  By the time they called him away to start his interviews, it had been almost the full half-hour, and it flew by.

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<p>Of course James Bond hooks up with Kissy Suzuki in 'You Only Live Twice.'&nbsp; I mean, her name is Kissy Suzuki.&nbsp; That's like destiny.</p>

Of course James Bond hooks up with Kissy Suzuki in 'You Only Live Twice.'  I mean, her name is Kissy Suzuki.  That's like destiny.

Credit: MGM/UA Home Video

James Bond Declassified: File #5 - 'You Only Live Twice' rewrites Fleming completely

HitFix
B-
Readers
n/a
For the first time, the producers threw out one of Fleming's books, but to what effect?

JAMES BOND 007 DECLASSIFIED
File #5:  "You Only Live Twice"

This series will trace the cinema history of James Bond, while also examining Ian Fleming's original novels as source material and examining how faithful (or not) the films have been to his work.

Directed by Lewis Gilbert
Screenplay by Roald Dahl
Produced by Harry Saltzman and Cubby Broccoli

CHARACTERS / CAST

James Bond / Sean Connery
Ernst Stavro Blofeld / Donald Pleasance
Aki / Akiko Wakabayashi
Kissy Suzuki / Mie Hama
Tiger Tanaka / Tetsuro Tanba
Mr. Osato / Teru Shimada
Helga Brandt / Karin Dor
"M" / Bernard Lee
"Q" / Desmond Llewelyn
Moneypenny / Lois Maxwell
Henderson / Charles Gray
Ling / Tsai Chin

CREDITS SEQUENCE

The orchestration of the sting is very different this time out, and I really dig the stop and fire this time.

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<p>Christopher Nolan's 'The Dark Knight Rises' looks like one classy ride, but we hope it erupts into a 45-minute women-in-prison movie starring Anne Hathaway halfway through. Is that wrong?</p>

Christopher Nolan's 'The Dark Knight Rises' looks like one classy ride, but we hope it erupts into a 45-minute women-in-prison movie starring Anne Hathaway halfway through. Is that wrong?

Credit: Warner Bros/Legendary

Watch: MTV premieres brand new 'Dark Knight Rises' footage during Movie Awards

More Hathaway and more Levitt gives us a better look at their characters

I'm not watching the MTV Movie Awards right now, but thankfully, I've long since realized that Twitter could also be called The Amazing Television Transcription Device, since anything that airs on TV is also live-tweeted moment by moment, line by line.

In this case, MTV made sure they had a big new "Dark Knight Rises" clip going up as part of tonight's presentation, and as soon as it showed up, my Twitter feed lit up with mentions of it.  Makes it very easy to go take a quick look without having to interrupt my screening of "You Only Live Twice" for more than a few minutes.  That makes me very happy, indeed.

The best thing MTV does during these shows is put together an exclusive package that often gives us one of our best looks at a film.  In this case, the footage they showed manages to make Bane seem even creepier than any of the trailer so far, and it also does a nice job of suggesting that Anne Hathaway and Joseph-Gordon Levitt both have significant roles in the film.  If Collider is right and this thing clocks in at 2:45 in theaters, there's going to be room for Nolan to really tie up everything for the characters he's introduced so far like Commissioner Gordon and Lucius Fox, and also tell this new story.

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<p>Michael Fassbender's work as David 8 is one of the very best things about Ridley Scott's 'Prometheus'</p>

Michael Fassbender's work as David 8 is one of the very best things about Ridley Scott's 'Prometheus'

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Review: Ridley Scott's 'Prometheus' reaches for greatness but comes up short

HitFix
B-
Readers
A
Startling images can't salvage a frustrating screenplay

At this point, the "Alien" series has managed to survive well past any expiration date I would have imagined possible.  The framework of the series has been bent and twisted and reshaped to accommodate several different styles and voices.  There is nothing about the series that I still consider sacred or off-limits, no single definition of what makes an "Alien" film.  For each new filmmaker, the series seems like a blank slate, a box of toys they can play with any way they choose.

While I haven't been a big fan of many of Ridley Scott's latest films, the idea of him finally returning to this world that he defined in the first place was an exciting one, and I've been intensely curious about "Prometheus" since the film was first announced.  I'll admit that the constant game of "is it a prequel or isn't it?" has worn on me, though, eroding much of my enthusiasm simply because I hate it when people play coy about things.  I'd rather hear nothing at all about a film than spend a year hearing the same cryptically worded quote over and over, especially since it has seemed transparently obvious since we first started seeing stills and footage that this is definitely connected directly to the first film in the series.

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<p>Christina Ricci and Robert Pattinson star in 'Bel Ami,' which arrives on streaming video services today</p>

Christina Ricci and Robert Pattinson star in 'Bel Ami,' which arrives on streaming video services today

Credit: Magnolia Pictures

Weekend Watch: Horrifying 'Loved Ones,' Pattinson's 'Bel Ami,' and Beatles on Blu

Blue Meanies, psycho girls, and more of this week's best bets

You've got a lot of options for what to watch and how, and we want to help you plan your weekend with a new column where we'll highlight three things you can see in theaters, three things you'll find streaming, and three titles new to home video.  Appropriately enough, we call this The Weekend Watch.

It's hard to believe that this is really summer.  "The Avengers" pulled all the oxygen out of the room, so the rest of the month has just felt like a typical spring, a warm-up for the main event.  That's starting to change this weekend, though, and even so, it's the smaller films hitting theater screens that I'm most intrigued by.

IN THEATERS TODAY

"The Loved Ones"

It's taken quite a while for this film to make it into theaters, but this weekend, Sean Byrne's unnerving high school horror film about Lola, the most disturbingly spoiled teenage girl in film history, and her own special version of the senior prom will finally make it to theaters in special midnight bookings.  Paramount has been good about selling horror films the last few years, and when they manage to turn an unflushable turd like "The Devil Inside" into a hit, they deserve some credit.  I wish "The Loved Ones" was opening wider, but if you like horror that pulls no punches, this one's worth the effort to track it down and check it out.

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<p>Alan Horn, seen here with Hilary Swank at the 'PS&nbsp;I&nbsp;Love You' premiere, has great relationships with talent that should serve him well in his new job at the Walt Disney Studios.</p>

Alan Horn, seen here with Hilary Swank at the 'PS I Love You' premiere, has great relationships with talent that should serve him well in his new job at the Walt Disney Studios.

Credit: AP Photo/Dan Steinberg

What does Alan Horn's hiring mean for the Walt Disney Studios?

We look at Horn's history and how it could change things for Disney

You don't have to be a decent person to run a successful movie studio.

In fact, in many cases, it seems like a lack of decency has led to some of the most successful runs at various studios over the years.  On those rare occasions when someone manages to be a genuinely great person who inspires real loyalty from everyone they work with while also turning out a continual string of major hits, that person is duly celebrated.  Alan Horn, by all accounts, is one of those rare people, and his tenure at Warner Bros. was not only one of the most successful eras the studio ever had, but also seemed to be distinguished by long-term relationships with artists who only had praise to offer when discussing Horn and his management style.

Today, Bob Iger, the chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company, issued an official announcement that Horn would be joining the company as Chairman of the Walt Disney Studios.  This puts him in charge of production, distribution, and marketing for anything made or released by Disney, Pixar, and Marvel, and he'll also be working marketing and distribution on any DreamWorks films that will be released by Touchstone.

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<p>Wes Anderson took time during a rain-soaked day at Cannes to talk to us about 'Moonrise Kingdom'</p>

Wes Anderson took time during a rain-soaked day at Cannes to talk to us about 'Moonrise Kingdom'

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Wes Anderson talks about building his 'Moonrise Kingdom'

What did Roman Coppola bring to the party?

You'd think that as long as I've been doing this, I would have interviewed Wes Anderson by now.

You'd think, but you'd be wrong.  Even though he's released most of his movies while I've been covering film, and I've been an ardent fan since "Bottle Rocket," which I still think is one of his most disarming films, it's never worked out for the two of us to sit down to talk about his work.

That's why when I was offered a chance to finally talk to him during the Cannes Film Festival about his new film, "Moonrise Kingdom," I jumped at the chance.  I'll have several other interviews for you in the next few days, but we wanted to kick things off with Anderson himself.

Before we started rolling, his publicist mentioned that I used to be with Ain't It Cool, and Anderson asked me what my spy name was.  I confessed that I was Moriarty, and he smiled.  "I thought so."

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<p>Mia Sara charms a unicorn in... er, wait... Kristen Stewart charms the White Hart in a lovely moment from the new fantasy-adventure 'Snow White and the Huntsman'</p>

Mia Sara charms a unicorn in... er, wait... Kristen Stewart charms the White Hart in a lovely moment from the new fantasy-adventure 'Snow White and the Huntsman'

Credit: Universal Pictures

Review: Kristen Stewart battles Charlize Theron in surprising 'Snow White'

HitFix
B-
Readers
B-
Strong fairy tale tone and ambitious first-time filmmaker deliver interesting take on oft-told tale

The last time Joe Roth produced an updated take on a classic fantasy story, the result was the numbingly painful "Alice In Wonderland," so when he announced an updated "Snow White," complete with a transformation by the lead character into a sword-wielding warrior, it immediately set me on edge.  After all, if I had to bet on either Tim Burton or a first-time filmmaker named Rupert Sanders to deliver something worthwhile, I would have put my money on Burton.

And I would have been wrong.

The greatest thing "Snow White And The Huntsman" has going for it is that it treats its fairy tale story seriously, and it treats the world it takes place in with a sense of wonder.  While Rupert Sanders seems to be a very big fan of Guillermo Del Toro and Peter Jackson, he manages to make this feel like its own thing.  It is still recognizably the Snow White story, but Evan Daughtery, John Lee Hancock, and Hossein Amini's screenplay expand the story in ways that feel like logical extensions of the text rather than radical reinventions.  The thing that surprised me most is that the film plays as dark as it does.  This is not a film for kids under 13 or so, and it is filled with nightmare imagery that many young viewers could be upset by.  Considering the almost insane levels of darkness in the original Grimm fairy tales, it's appropriate.  I'm just not used to seeing fairy tales treated this way by mainstream Hollywood.

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<p>You can expect a whole lot more of this in the reshot version of 'G.i. Joe Retaliation' that will open in March 2013.</p>

You can expect a whole lot more of this in the reshot version of 'G.i. Joe Retaliation' that will open in March 2013.

Credit: Paramount

Paramount's decision to move 'G.I Joe Retaliation' could be a no-win for the studio

As their cover story crumbles, a picture of a troubled production emerges

Walk down the aisle of a grocery store, and you'll see products with the "G.I. Joe Retaliation" logo slapped on them.  Hit the right toy store that didn't get the memo, and you'll see "G.I. Joe Retaliation" toys on the shelves.  Drive around LA, and you'll see plenty of outdoor posters for the film.  It looks like Paramount's got their sequel to the live-action "Rise Of Cobra" ready to go and on its way to theaters on June 29th.

That's not true, though.  They've pushed the film to a March 29th, 2013 release, and the reason they gave last week when details started to break was that they wanted to make sure they had time to give the film a good 3D post-conversion.

This week, though, that cover story is starting to collapse, and a very different picture is emerging of a film in trouble, a director being pushed aside, and reshoots designed to radically alter the fate of at least one character.  In an age where even the smallest details on a film seem to be known months ahead of release, I'm not sure how Paramount thought they were going to get away with a cover story as simple as "We like 3D," but it's apparent that they're going to have to contend with months of tough buzz instead, and their decision to move the film could be make or break and worth hundreds of millions of dollars to a studio that can't afford to throw away any money right now.

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