<p>Artemis Fowl is headed for the big screen if Harvey Weinstein and Disney have anything to say about it.</p>

Artemis Fowl is headed for the big screen if Harvey Weinstein and Disney have anything to say about it.

Credit: Viking Press

Harvey Weinstein and Disney kiss and make up to co-produce 'Artemis Fowl' series

Can this one crack the code and kickstart a franchise?

When people say that Harvey Weinstein is once again working with Disney, that's true on a technical level, but the people he'll deal with as he makes "Artemis Fowl' with the studio are not the same people who were in charge during the contentious final days of his time there during the Miramax/Disney years.

I have no particular problem with Eoin Colfer or his work. It's fine, and if you like the conceit that 12-year-old Artemis is a criminal genius who has amassed a great and secret fortune, working right under the noses of his parents. His father is a fairly bad guy himself and his mother is working to make the whole family stay on the straight and narrow. It's part of that huge surge of young adult fiction that appeared on the heels of Harry Potter, and it has enough of its own voice that I don't hate the idea of seeing movies… I'm just not convinced there's any real reason beyond demographic market research.

The press release that came out today is full of sunshiney quotes from Harvey about how thrilled he is to be back in business with Disney and lots of heartfelt endorsements from Alan Horn about how much fun he had with Harvey when he was at Warner Bros., and it all sounds like champagne and lollipops, and it all reads like carefully prepared statements to me. Fine. You guys see some money to be made here, and Harvey's had these rights tied up for a while now and why not?

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<p>I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who had issues with some of this stuff.</p>

I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who had issues with some of this stuff.

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Chris Claremont, who helped define the 'X-Men' in comics, weighs in on 'The Wolverine'

Are comic writers involved enough with adaptations?

This weekend, I watched the new DC animated film "Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox," and I thought it was really well-done overall. One of the things that most impressed me was a credits block where they named the creators of several of the major characters used in the film.

"SUPERMAN created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster.
By Special Arrangement with the Jerry Siegel Family.
BATMAN created by Bob Kane.
WONDER WOMAN created by William Moulton Marston.
AQUAMAN created by Paul Norris.
ETRIGAN THE DEMON created by Jack Kirby.
CYBORG and DEATHSTROKE created by Marv Wolfman and George Perez.
GRIFTER created by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi."

And, no, I don't know why they don't also credit Gardner Fox and Harry Lampert for creating The Flash, since this is a Flash-heavy movie, or why they don't include the creators of The Green Lantern or Shazam. It's been a slow and interesting process watching DC and Marvel grapple with how to handle the credits on their films, both animated and live-action, and so far, most of these decisions have been made because of legal action, not a sense of wanting to credit those who deserve it.

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<p>Star Lord, Groot, and Rocket Racoon are all part of next year's 'Guardians Of The Galaxy'</p>

Star Lord, Groot, and Rocket Racoon are all part of next year's 'Guardians Of The Galaxy'

Credit: Marvel Studios

What did we learn about James Gunn's 'Guardians Of The Galaxy' at Comic-Con this year?

And why is 'Movie 43' such a strong audition tape for Gunn to make 'Galaxy'?

I've been talking to people about "Guardians Of The Galaxy" for the last week or so, some who were at Marvel's Hall H presentation, many who were not, and I think at this point, it's safe to call this the single biggest risk on Marvel's calendar. I don't think there's much middle ground on this one. Either it wins people over and becomes a big hit, or it never gets past the initial impression that many people seem to have, which is, "There's a raccoon who does WHAT?!"

About a week ago, I finally sat down and watched "Movie 43," the anthology comedy film that has been vilified since its release at the start of the year. I think the film is dirty more than funny, intentionally trading shocks for laughs for the most part, but the segment that was directed by James Gunn is, in a very strange way, the single best audition tape that Gunn could have made for the "Guardians Of The Galaxy" job.

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<p>Kathleen Kennedy and JJ&nbsp;Abrams are hard at work preparing for the start of production on 'Star Wars:&nbsp;Episode VII'</p>

Kathleen Kennedy and JJ Abrams are hard at work preparing for the start of production on 'Star Wars: Episode VII'

Credit: Lucasfilm Ltd.

John Williams will return to score the new 'Star Wars' trilogy for JJ Abrams

More news should start breaking out of SWCE2013

Right now, Star Wars Celebration Europe 2013 is underway, and that means there will be news about all the different corners of the "Star Wars" universe and what fans should be looking forward to in the near and far future. Of course, the majority of the attention of the fan community right now is focused on "Star Wars Episode VII," and all you have to do is look at the way any rumor of any substance ripples through the entire Internet to know how keen the anticipation is out there for this film, whatever it's going to be.

I think JJ Abrams has a terrifying job. Seriously. I think anyone after him who directs anything related to "Star Wars" has permission to play, and we're going to see just how flexible a film universe it is in the next decade or so. But for JJ Abrams, this is the moment. For "Star Wars," this is the moment. The prequels left a divided fandom. The television projects have divided fandom. There are fans so hurt that they don't consider themselves fans anymore. The only thing that is going to truly bring fandom back together in a meaningful way is if this next film gets it right. Abrams has to convince us all that there's something left to tell, some reason for these movies to go on. It's not just "And then some more stuff happened!" This is "Star Wars." It's got to be a story that feels like it takes everything that's come before and spins it into something new and engrossing and fun and exciting and different.

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<p>Lorraine Warren trusted James Wan to tell her story on film, and we sat down with both of them to talk about 'The Conjuring'</p>

Lorraine Warren trusted James Wan to tell her story on film, and we sat down with both of them to talk about 'The Conjuring'

Credit: HitFix

Winning the creepy Annabelle doll from 'The Conjuring' is as simple as sending a Tweet

Plus check out the director of the year's scariest film with the real-life inspiration

UPDATED: We are pleased to announce that Linda Vee Sado (@LindaVeeSado on Twitter) is the winner of the Annabelle doll contest, and will soon be welcoming the haunted doll to her house. You're very brave, Linda, and congratulations!

ORIGINAL STORY BELOW

Normally, I would have posted all of the interviews we had for "The Conjuring" before the film opened last Friday, but a couple of things prevented that from happening.

First, we ended up with a whoooooole lot of James Wan in one seven-day period thanks to a press day they had for "Insidious: Chapter Two" in LA, and we decided to space the interviews out a little bit so as not to overload you guys. Second, Comic-Con. It might seem like there's no verb in that sentence, but trust me… "Comic-Con" encompasses whatever else I might say on the matter.

I am thrilled to see how well "The Conjuring" is doing, and not because I really care about numbers, but because I think this is an uncommonly good version of what a studio horror film can be, and I want to see them rewarded for not only making a very good movie, but also for selling it right. They have been carefully laying the groundwork for that opening weekend for most of this year, and it really paid off.

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<p>David Twohy seemed pleased by the reception to the footage they showed Friday at Comic-Con from his new film 'Riddick'</p>

David Twohy seemed pleased by the reception to the footage they showed Friday at Comic-Con from his new film 'Riddick'

Credit: HitFix

David Twohy talked to us about the creative struggles of getting a new 'Riddick' made

We talk about playing pulp with a straight face

David Twohy has carved out a very specific place for himself in the world of genre movies, and I think it's amazing he's been able to pull it off considering how sincerely he treats it.

Sincerity is not a virtue in modern pop culture, or at least it's not treated as one. Everything in pop culture seems to be winking at you all the time these days, and the more post-modern something is, the more it feels like it fits into the current landscape. I don't mind some of that, and done right, like in this summer's "This Is The End," it can pay off surprising dividends. Done wrong, though, and it highlights the artificial nature of film in a way that kills it for me.

I would much rather see someone do something they mean sincerely, even if it is just a crazy action film or a weird science-fiction flick. Twohy started out plugging away in the low-budget genre world in the late '80s as a writer on "Critters 2" and "Warlock," making his debut as a filmmaker with 1992's "Timescape." He had his first big mainstream success the following year as the screenwriter of "The Fugitive," and then as one of the many writers who had their hands on "Waterworld."

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<p>Hiroyuki Sanada finds himself surrounded by Rila Fukushima and Tao Okamoto, just as he is in James Mangold's new film 'The Wolverine'</p>

Hiroyuki Sanada finds himself surrounded by Rila Fukushima and Tao Okamoto, just as he is in James Mangold's new film 'The Wolverine'

Credit: HitFix

The Japanese cast of 'The Wolverine' talks about joining Hugh Jackman on his journey

Two first-timers are joined by a veteran Japanese star

Perhaps the most striking thing about "The Wolverine" is how Fox committed to a film that features a largely Asian cast, which much of the film subtitled. That's a fascinating decision that goes completely against the thought process that we see studios utilize much of the time.

I'd say that both Yukio and Mariko benefit from the adaptation process, emerging as more interesting characters in the film than they were on the page. It helps that Rila Fukushima and Tao Okamoto are playing the parts, and they both seem like they saw this as a huge opportunity.

It makes perfect sense to me that Fukushima is a model, because she's one of those people who is just plain interesting on-camera. I joked about her resemblance to Christina Ricci in my review of "The Wolverine," but like Ricci, she seems to be about 87% eyes. In our chat, we talked about her crash course in swordsmanship, and the fact that she looks as proficient as she does in the film is just a nice reminder of how much illusion is involved in movies.

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<p>Katee Sackhoff talked to us about her fondness for the character of 'Riddick' and her experience working with Vin Diesel on the film.</p>

Katee Sackhoff talked to us about her fondness for the character of 'Riddick' and her experience working with Vin Diesel on the film.

Credit: HitFix

Katee Sackhoff on being 'incredibly odd' and playing make believe with Vin Diesel for 'Riddick'

The 'Battlestar Galactica' star found a place for herself on this film

SAN DIEGO - I've liked Katee Sackhoff since watching the first season of "Battlestar Galactica," but over the span of two days at this year's San Diego Comic-Con, I've come to think much more highly of her.

First, she's a great spokesman for "Riddick," the latest chapter in the space opera serial that David Twohy and Vin Diesel have made, and she seems excited to be joining the series. On the panel in Hall H and then again when we spoke later in the day, she seems thrilled to be in the film and to have been given the character to play. Dahl is a bounty hunter who shows up as part of a team that has been tracking Riddick because of something that happened in "Pitch Black," and she manages to find all sorts of grace notes in what could easily have been a very thin stereotype. David Twohy writes genuine no-apologies pulp movies, and I think actors have to be willing to dig in and find something real to play in a situation like this.

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<p>Keanu Reeves is suddenly everywhere, including 'Man Of Tai Chi,' which will be featured at this year's Fantastic Fest in Austin.</p>

Keanu Reeves is suddenly everywhere, including 'Man Of Tai Chi,' which will be featured at this year's Fantastic Fest in Austin.

Credit: RADiUS-TWC

Fantastic Fest's first wave of programming includes Keanu Reeves in 'Man Of Tai Chi'

Plus the amazing 'Cheap Thrills' and many others

I feel like I've been on the road nonstop for the last two months, and I'm leaving again for another trip on Saturday. Because of this, I'm hoping to spend most of August at home in Los Angeles, enjoying the end of the summer with my kids, especially since September means nearly a full month on the road at film festivals each year. There's the Toronto International Film Festival, and then there's Fantastic Fest.

For someone who doesn't go to festivals often, it would be hard to explain why Fantastic Fest remains my favorite film event each year even over Cannes or Sundance. I think every festival has a distinct identity, or at least the ones I attend do, and that's important. If you're just showing a bunch of movies, that's not a festival. If you're creating a curated experience that is designed to bombard an audience with awesome, that's a festival. And that's Fantastic Fest all over.

They typically announce their programming in waves, and today, we've got a look at the first batch of announced titles, with our thoughts punctuating the line-up.

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<p>Keanu appears to, once again, be the One in the upcoming action epic '47 Ronin'</p>

Keanu appears to, once again, be the One in the upcoming action epic '47 Ronin'

Credit: Universal Pictures

First '47 Ronin' trailer promises gorgeous scenery, Keanu swordfights and CGI beasts

I think it's safe to say this is not a traditional approach to the story

When I moderated Universal's Comic-Con panel this year, we covered two films. "Kick-Ass 2" and "Riddick" were perfect fits for that crowd, and I can tell you that we didn't have a spare minute up on that stage. Just giving those two films their time was frantic, so there wasn't room for Universal to bring and showcase anything else in that hour.

If there was any other film I would have been interested in having up there, it would have been "47 Ronin." This is, by most published accounts so far, a deeply troubled movie. This was supposed to be in theaters in November of 2012, but instead, that's right around the time Universal took the film away from director Carl Erik Rinsch. Some people are reporting the film's budget as high as $225 million, with Universal officially stating it's $175 million, which is still GIGANTIC.

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