<p>Dave Gibbons helped Mark Millar realize a dream he's had since he was a teenager when he agreed to illustrated 'The Secret Service'</p>

Dave Gibbons helped Mark Millar realize a dream he's had since he was a teenager when he agreed to illustrated 'The Secret Service'

Credit: Millarworld

Matthew Vaughn's 'The Secret Service' film lands at Fox worldwide

Production on the next Vaughn/Millar collaboration begins later this year

One of the things I heard repeatedly while I was on the set of "Kick-Ass 2" was just how eager Matthew Vaughn was to get started on his adaptation of "The Secret Service," another Mark Millar comic book. This was not long after Vaughn had officially left "X-Men: Days Of Future Past," and the rumor mill was in overdrive that Vaughn was going to be the guy who took the helm of "Star Wars: Episode VII."

I was told repeatedly during my visit that the "Star Wars" rumor wasn't true, and that Vaughn's full attention was on getting "The Secret Service" up and running. One of the reasons they wanted to move quickly was because both Millar and Vaughn were concerned that someone would take the basic premise of the series and make a movie that would beat them to the punch. This is a series that Millar has been thinking about since he was in his early 20s, and it only recently came to fruition with Dave Gibbons, his dream artist, handling the visual side of things.

When Millar first started talking about the premise for the series, he said this incarnation began life a few years ago in a pub when he and Vaughn were discussing "Casino Royale" and wondering why they didn't start with the actual training of James Bond if they were planning to fully reboot the character. They discussed the way Terence Young helped transform the rough-around-the-edges Sean Connery into the refined James Bond that we met onscreen in "Dr. No," and they talked about a fictional version of that process. Millar described it as a counter-terrorism spin on "My Fair Lady," which is definitely a high concept hook.

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<p>Aaron Johnson and Chloe Moretz both reprise their roles for 'Kick-Ass 2'</p>

Aaron Johnson and Chloe Moretz both reprise their roles for 'Kick-Ass 2'

Credit: Universal Pictures

A new Hit Girl-heavy 'Kick-Ass 2' trailer arrives online

Chloe Moretz has to figure out how to handle mean girls without killing them

I'm guessing we're going to get a number of character trailers for "Kick-Ass 2" now, and the first one arrives today. It's very Hit Girl-centric, and small wonder: when we look back on these films eventually, however many they end up making, one of the things that will be most notable about them is the story of Hit Girl and the actor playing her. Chloe Moretz has had a fairly remarkable series of experiences between the two films, and seeing the way she plays this role on both sides of all of those other films is pretty remarkable.

Right before she flew to London for "Kick-Ass 2," Moretz finished work on Kimberly Pierce's "Carrie," and when we spoke at Pinewood Studios, she was still trying to fully digest that experience. Carrie White is a certain kind of reserved and withdrawn and beaten down, and while "Kick-Ass 2" sees Mindy facing the scorn of the mean girls at her high school, she's no victim. I'm guessing the reactions you'll see from the two characters couldn't be more different.

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<p>Don Payne was a big part of helping to figure out how to bring 'Thor' to the screen.</p>

Don Payne was a big part of helping to figure out how to bring 'Thor' to the screen.

Credit: Marvel Studios

Don Payne, writer of both 'Thor' movies and 'The Simpsons,' has passed away

Social media spreads the sad news as his friends remember him

Don Payne, whose film credits include "Thor," "Fantastic Four: Rise Of The Silver Surfer," and "Thor: The Dark World" passed away last night in Los Angeles, according to friends who spread the word today via Twitter.

It seems fitting that I learned the news from the Twitter feeds of both Kat Dennings and Jaimie Alexander, who played Darcy and Sif in "Thor," and from Mike Scully, the man who first hired Payne to write for "The Simpsons." Payne is one of those people who I never met, but who was friends with a number of people who I am friends with, and I always heard good things about him on a personal level. He inspired real loyalty in some people I trust implicitly, and I always hoped we would end up meeting at some point. One of the people speaking fondly of him tonight was Zack Stentz, one of the other credited writers on "Thor," which I think speaks volumes. It isn't everyone who can remain friends on the far side of an arbitration process.

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<p>He's just as happy to be in 'G.I. Joe' as fans are to have him.</p>

He's just as happy to be in 'G.I. Joe' as fans are to have him.

Credit: HitFix

Dwayne Johnson discusses his new role as 'franchise Viagra' for 'G.I. Joe'

The Rock was an '80s kid, and he can't hide his enthusiasm for his new role

It has been a very Dwayne Johnson-heavy day here on the blog.

And why not? It's his Hollywood, and the rest of us are just living in it. After all, he's got four films out this year before we even reach June, and one of those is one of the most highly-anticipated event sequels of the summer. He has settled into his new role as Hollywood's "franchise Viagra," the guy you bring in when you want to make a new movie in a series and your'e not sure how to get people interested in it again. There is a very clear sense in the new "G.I. Joe" of the series being passed from Channing Tatum's Duke to Johnson's Roadblock.

One thing that distinguishes Johnson from the typical action heroes of the '80s is just how able he is to make you forget he happens to be a gigantic slab of muscle. When he talks about how he loved "G.I. Joe" as a kid, I can actually picture him as that kid, and he seems amazed to be a real-life action figure these days.

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<p>It's the subtle sophisticated humor that has led to more than one critic calling Michael Bay 'the new Billy Wilder'</p>

It's the subtle sophisticated humor that has led to more than one critic calling Michael Bay 'the new Billy Wilder'

Credit: Paramount Pictures

Mark Wahlberg and The Rock play dummies with a dream in new red-band 'Pain and Gain' trailer

Michael Bay's moral compass is broken, and thank god for that

When I praise Michael Bay, I feel like I have to explain that I'm being ironic and I'm not doing it sarcastically. I've had plenty of problems with plenty of his films, but the things I like, I like quite a bit. "Bad Boys II," for instance. That is a startling film, a studio movie that seems to have a completely and utterly broken moral compass. It is actively offensive, and I have to admire how completely committed to things it is. It feels like the perfect movie reaction to what was happening in gaming at the time, like the "Grand Theft Auto" series. It's incredibly well-made, even if it feels like everyone involved had to be just a little bit crazy to think that it was okay.

This new red-band trailer for "Pain and Gain" looks like the movie that's been backing up Bay's system the entire time he's been making the "Transformers" movies. He has been a good soldier for Paramount as he cranked those money-making behemoths out, and while I like a lot of the set piece work that he's done in the series, I've never felt like his heart was fully in what he was doing. The most personal details in those films tend to be the things that people react negatively to, and it's always seemed like a bit of an ill fit between franchise and filmmaker.

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<p>Channing Tatum, Jamie Foxx, terrorists, the White House... whattaya want, a road map?</p>

Channing Tatum, Jamie Foxx, terrorists, the White House... whattaya want, a road map?

Credit: Sony Pictures

Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx throw down in action-packed trailer for 'White House Down'

Emmerich blows up his favorite landmark again

It's an interesting afternoon of trailers, particularly because you can find plenty of examples of me raining scorn on the work of Michael Bay and Roland Emmerich online if you go looking. At one point, Michael Bay got so used to me disliking him that he would just roll his eyes when he saw me.

Today, though, I'm sincerely impressed by the trailers for both "Pain and Gain" and "White House Down." We'll get into "White House Down" first, and it's doubly interesting to see this less than a week after sitting in the theater watching "Olympus Has Fallen" unfold. Say what you will about Roland Emmerich as a storyteller, but he orchestrates large-scale chaos with a sharp eye, and he's gotten better at it over the years. If anyone knows the value of destroying the White House in a movie, it's Emmerich, and he seems to have pulled out all the stops for this one.

What variations on the basic formula will we see here? Well, in "Olympus," Gerard Butler is a Secret Service agent who has been sidelined because he was involved in an accident involving the First Lady. Here, Channing Tatum is a DC cop who wasn't able to get a job in the Secret Service, and I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that he proves himself capable of the job at some point in the movie, just as Butler redeemed himself.

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<p>Life gets really weird sometimes when you're growing up Film Nerd 2.0-style.</p>

Life gets really weird sometimes when you're growing up Film Nerd 2.0-style.

Credit: HitFix

Watch: Film Nerd 2.0 comes face to face with Dwayne Johnson in an action-figure showdown

A sweet moment involving the artist formerly known as The Rock and my five-year-old

When I think back on how I processed things as a kid, I can't imagine what would have changed for me if I had the sort of opportunities that my kids have. I dreamed of having the sorts of encounters that they have all the time now, and I am thrilled every time I can allow them to do something that is unique or special.

For example, last week a box of toys from "G.I. Joe: Retaliation" showed up at the house, and the boys went crazy with them. In particular, Allen was smitten with a large-size action figure of Dwayne Johnson, and when he took it to pre-school as his share toy for the day, the other kids in his class went nuts for it. Several of the kids were aware of Dwayne as The Rock, and when Allen brought the figure home, he had stopped calling him Roadblock and started just calling him The Rock.

I never know who will or won't be a big deal to the boys. On Friday, Allen went with me to the press day for "42," the new film about Jackie Robinson, and I had an interview with Harrison Ford scheduled. Allen seemed totally unimpressed by Ford in general, even though he's a huge Han Solo fan. I wasn't sure at first that he even understood who he met. Ford does, after all, look fairly different now as he settles into the Spencer Tracy phase of his career. Allen told me afterwards in the car that it was amazing, and he got more excited when he told his brother who he met, but in the room? Cool as cool gets about it all.

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<p>This is the single worst 'Where's Waldo?' puzzle of all time.</p>

This is the single worst 'Where's Waldo?' puzzle of all time.

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Why does a sneak peek at 'The Wolverine' contain a massive spoiler?

New marketing materials for this summer's sequel frustrate on many levels

This should go without saying after the intentionally vague headline, but there will be some big spoilers in this article for "The Wolverine." Read accordingly.

Here's one of those moments when a decision is made by someone on a film and I'm so baffled by it that I'm not even sure what to write or how to handle the headline.

James Mangold is the director of this summer's "The Wolverine," and that's one of those choices that has kept me interested since he was announced. Darren Aronofsky was first on the film, but when Mangold took over in development, it seemed like a cool and unconventional choice, which can pay off in cool ways sometimes. The entire time Mangold has been in production, he's been pretty vocal about the sort of thing he's trying to make, and they've done a great job of keeping images from the film locked down. As a result, all we've had were a few on-set photographs, a couple of portrait images, and that's it. Descriptions, and nothing more.

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'Excuse me, stewardess, but I'm hungry and was wondering if I could get another bag of ohmygodwhatisthatandhowdiditgetonthisplane?!'
'Excuse me, stewardess, but I'm hungry and was wondering if I could get another bag of ohmygodwhatisthatandhowdiditgetonthisplane?!'
Credit: Paramount Pictures

Brad Pitt masters his dumbfounded stare for the last 'World War Z' trailer

'Daddy, what's martial law?'

I'm starting to get the feeling that the people who are going to like "World War Z" the most are the people that are already familiar with "World War Z" because they read the book and loved it.

Personally, I'm not sure what to make of these trailers. It's odd that they refuse to say the word "zombie" anywhere, especially since not every audience is going to get the title's meaning right away. It's also odd that we have yet to see a long sustained shot of what a zombie actually looks like in the film.

Instead, we're looking at lots and lots of CGI figures swarming like ants, and a buttload of Brad Pitt reaction shots. I'm not even sure if Pitt's character has the same job in this version of the story as he does in the book, because this feels more like the war against these things is in full-swing. In the book, you get an oral history from a number of different perspectives, but it feels like the world of the novel is starting to heal itself. Here, we're obviously still at the start of everything, and it's more of a "find a cure" ticking clock with Pitt's character right at the heart of it.

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<p>You want to fix your franchise?&nbsp;Just add The Rock.</p>

You want to fix your franchise? Just add The Rock.

Credit: Paramount Pictures

Review: Dwayne Johnson and Adrianne Palicki make 'GI Joe: Retaliation' serious fun

HitFix
B-
Readers
B-
Jon Chu's obvious fandom makes this one feel especially sincere

I had fun with "G.I. Joe: The Rise Of Cobra," and I don't remotely feel bad about it. Stephen Sommers isn't a great overall storyteller, but when it comes to ridiculous action movies that seem giddy on their own invention, Sommers has done it right more often than wrong. I think "Van Helsing" is so bad and such a frustrating botch of a decent high concept that is almost erased any goodwill he'd ever built up as a director, but "G.I. Joe" felt like a nice rebound.

When I praised the film, I made the very clear distinction that I liked the energy with which he told the story and the reality that the movie created. I thought Channing Tatum was miscast in the lead, and when I recently rewatched the film, I feel like it's pretty clear that Tatum hadn't really relaxed into his own talents as a performer yet. I felt like the film had a pretty clear shot at kickstarting a series, and while I enjoyed it, I think Sommers didn't care about doing "G.I. Joe" the way the fans would want to see, but instead used "G.I. Joe" as an excuse to make a Stephen Sommers movie that just happened to use a sort of sci-fi military premise that fit the title.

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