<p>Ben Affleck&#39;s starting to realize that he might, in fact, be completely screwed in David Fincher&#39;s adaptation of the best-selling novel &#39;Gone Girl&#39;</p>

Ben Affleck's starting to realize that he might, in fact, be completely screwed in David Fincher's adaptation of the best-selling novel 'Gone Girl'

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Ben Affleck looks great in the first moody trailer for Fincher's 'Gone Girl'

Looks like Fincher's taking on the news media in this one

There's a cover version of "She" that Elvis Costello recorded for "Notting Hill" that positively floors me every time I hear it. I think Costello has one of the great male signing voices of the last 40 years, and that song is positively perfect for him, full of longing and regret and that particular blend of joy and pain that distinguishes the best love stories. It's not a song he wrote, though. It was first recorded by Charles Aznavour in the '70s, and he did versions in several different languages.

I've always wanted to use the Costello version in a particular film. I've had it in my head since I wrote a scene in a script at least a decade ago, and since then, I've hoped that no one would use it, that it would pretty much completely fade away. And now David Fincher's gone and ruined that for me, and even worse, I can't be mad about it because he did it so damn well.

Richard Butler, the lead singer of the Psychedelic Furs, is the performer of the version that's in the "Gone Girl" trailer, and while I don't think his version is remotely as effective, it's perfect for the trailer, and the rushed, almost off-key vocals capture some of the weird, off-center anxiety that is so obviously part of Fincher's adaptation of the massive best-selling novel by Gillian Flynn.

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<p>If they could make him look exactly like this, it might make a &#39;Blade Runner 2&#39; interesting, but short of it, aren&#39;t we asking the filmmakers to ruin the first film&#39;s ambiguity?</p>

If they could make him look exactly like this, it might make a 'Blade Runner 2' interesting, but short of it, aren't we asking the filmmakers to ruin the first film's ambiguity?

Credit: Warner Bros

Harrison Ford discusses 'Blade Runner 2' during rowdy Reddit AMA

Plus he shuts down some geeky questions in his own delightfully grumpy manner

Oh, Harrison.

While Harrison Ford is one of the few guys working right now who I could indisputably call "iconic," I find myself ambivalent about his persona when he's giving interviews. I've had some good chats with him, and some that were more difficult, and it completely seems to be up to his mood at the moment we sit down.

The same can be said about his appearances on talk shows. He's done it well at times, and there are other interviews where it looks like he wants to crawl out of his skin, and for an actor, he seems to have no interest in disguising his feelings at all. He seems perfectly happy to snarl at someone if he thinks they ask him something stupid or obvious, which makes it extra-surprising that he was willing to do a Reddit AMA to help promote the new documentary series "Years Of Living Dangerously."

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<p>As long as ABC agrees to put Hayley Atwell in the red dress from &#39;Captain America: The First Avenger&#39; every week, I&#39;m all in for the proposed series.</p>

As long as ABC agrees to put Hayley Atwell in the red dress from 'Captain America: The First Avenger' every week, I'm all in for the proposed series.

Credit: Marvel Studios

Hayley Atwell's 'Agent Carter' rumored to be heading to ABC series pick-up

The series could give Atwell a major showcase for her talents

Anything that puts Hayley Atwell on my TV once a week is a good thing.

It's that time of the year, where we hear all sorts of rumors about what might or might not be happening. This morning, one of the bigger stories concerns another ABC Marvel series, one that would run concurrently with "Marvel's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.", which is well on its way to a second season pick-up.

While I haven't seen anything specific about the approach they're taking to the proposed series "Agent Carter," it would obviously hinge on Hayley Atwell's character from "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," one of the most interesting female leads they've had in any of the Marvel movies. It sounds like it would essentially serve as a prequel to the series they already have on the air, but is that enough of a change to make this worth the greenlight?

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<p>Hellboy, Batman, and Magneto are all represented on our list of the 25 best superhero films of all time.</p>

Hellboy, Batman, and Magneto are all represented on our list of the 25 best superhero films of all time.

Credit: Revolution/Warner Bros/20th Century Fox

From 'Darkman' to 'The Dark Knight': 25 greatest superhero movies of all time

We were surprised by films both on and off the list

It seems hard to believe that there could even be 25 films in the superhero genre that would be worth putting on a list at this point, much less enough that there are worthy titles I feel were left off, but that's where we are in 2014.

As the reviews started rolling in for "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," with many people calling it the best superhero movie ever made, we decided to throw the question out to the entire HitFix staff to ask people to rank their favorite films in the genre. We did this several years ago with the top ten, but at this point, we felt like the roster was deep enough to ask people to vote for their favorite 25.

What surprised me is just how much variety there were in the answers. There are many films that were on my list that didn't make the final tally, and that was true with everyone. What surprised me more were some of the titles that made the list. I may be a big fan of Ang Lee's "Hulk," but I totally understand why not everyone feels the same way. I was happy to see so much support for it.

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<p>Bryan Singer and Michael Fassbender prepare for Magneto to go to war</p>

Bryan Singer and Michael Fassbender prepare for Magneto to go to war

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Bryan Singer describes his reasons for returning for 'X-Men: Days Of Future Past'

He seems ready to reclaim the series as his own

We're in the home stretch now as Fox prepares to release "X-Men: Days Of Future Past," which means we're going to get pounded by publicity materials between now and the actual release date.

This new behind-the-scenes feature that was just released deals primarily with Bryan Singer and his reasons for jumping back into the director's chair for the latest entry in one of the longest-running of the modern superhero series. Singer's first two films paved the way for much of what we see now, and when he left the series, it wasn't completely voluntary.

While I understand how attractive the chance to revisit Richard Donner's "Superman" must have been to Singer, I think it was a mistake for him to leave the "X-Men" series before he made the film that he planned to follow-up "X2" with, and I'm not sure the series has ever truly recovered from that moment.

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<p>Arian Foster and Terry Crews talked about how accurate they felt &#39;Draft Day&#39; was to their own experiences in the NFL.</p>

Arian Foster and Terry Crews talked about how accurate they felt 'Draft Day' was to their own experiences in the NFL.

Credit: HitFix

Terry Crews and Arian Foster look to real life to discuss the authenticity of 'Draft Day'

Is Crews the greatest motivational speaker in Hollywood right now?

One of my favorite people to interview is Terry Crews.

I could probably shorten that to simply say that Terry Crews is one of my favorite people, because it's true. He is one of those character actors who makes anything better simply by being in it, a guy who is both visually distinct and also gifted with a really wicked sense of timing. He's great at comedy and he seems equally adept at drama when people give him that chance.

The last time I spoke with him was during the release of "Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2," and I had just seen the first few episodes of "Brooklyn Nine-Nine." I talked to him about the potential of that show, so it was nice to be able to sit down with him again on the other end of the season to talk about just how great the show got in that first year. He is part of a wonderful ensemble on the series, and he seems really excited to see how things came together over the first 22 episodes.

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<p>Jennifer Garner could hardly contain how much she enjoys football when we spoke about her work in the new film &#39;Draft Day&#39;</p>

Jennifer Garner could hardly contain how much she enjoys football when we spoke about her work in the new film 'Draft Day'

Credit: HitFix

Jennifer Garner on how her own football fandom prepared her for 'Draft Day'

Plus watch her geek out about playing scenes with Ellen Burstyn

Just before we started this interview, I mentioned the craziest thing that happened on the set of "The Invention Of Lying," curious to see if Garner had ever made the connection. When I visited that set, it was in Lowell, Massachusetts, and it was just me visiting for the two days I was there. They sent a driver to my hotel on both days to get me to and from the set, and if there's anything I've learned over the years, it is that you should always talk to the drivers on a film, because they know everything.

Sure enough, the guy who drove me back and forth during my time in Lowell was especially chatty, a really nice guy who had grown up in the area. One of the things we discussed was that another movie company had optioned the rights to the driver's life and they were planning to make a film about him. He told me some of the details of his life and his story, and he told me a few stories about his brother, and I'll say this much… he was great at telling those stories. Even so, I figured I'd never hear anything else about the guy or his story.

Then a few years later, David O. Russell released "The Fighter," and I pretty much got my mind blown. The driver on "The Invention Of Lying" was Micky Ward, and they really did end up making the movie about his life story. When I asked Garner if she remembered him, she had that same "oh my god" moment that I'd had in the theater. She said she never made the connection, but she remembered him from when he was a driver.

I've run into Garner many times over the years, and she always strikes me as someone who is essentially unchanged by their time working in the film industry. She never seems like she considers herself a star, and she seems to genuinely consider whatever question you ask her instead of just offering up the same sound bite over and over. I'm not sure Hollywood really knows what to do with her. She's given plenty of good performances, but she's never really had that one role where she cuts loose and shows us everything she's capable of. Maybe that's not important to her. She seems perfectly happy giving strong performances in supporting roles, and she doesn't seem driven to work non-stop just to keep working.

She also seems like she's still very connected to her roots, as you'll see when we talk about her upbringing in our interview about the new film "Draft Day," where she co-stars with Kevin Costner. We talked a bit about working with Ellen Burstyn, who plays Costner's mother in the film, and her joy at getting to work with Burstyn was very clear from the conversation.

Overall, it's always nice to check in with Garner, and especially when you're able to discuss something where she's done nice work.

"Draft Day" opens in theaters everywhere on Friday.

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<p>Your kids are sure to love the abundance of GPS-related humor in &#39;Rio 2&#39;</p>

Your kids are sure to love the abundance of GPS-related humor in 'Rio 2'

Credit: 20th Century Fox/Blue Sky Studios
C

Review: 'Rio 2' is fine for kids, but seems too familiar to really fly

Hey, at least it'll make Fox shareholders happy

"Rio 2" is a perfect example of franchise maintenance in place of storytelling, and the nicest thing I can say about it is that my kids found it to be an agreeable way to spend part of an afternoon.

I know I saw the first "Rio." My review of it was published in the days before we started putting letter grades on films in our reviews, but I would have given it a B or a B-. I liked the way they used Rio as a setting, I thought the performances were spirited and fun, and I really liked the soundtrack that was put together by Sergio Mendes. The sequel, which is practically the definition of "more of the same," is less successful in the way it uses the rain forest as a setting, and it features performances that feel far more phoned in while still featuring a non-stop dynamic soundtrack put together by Sergio Mendes. There is nothing about the film that feels particularly compelling, and the story is really just an excuse to put a new obstacle between Blu (Jesse Eisenberg) and Jewel (Anne Hathaway) while bad guy Nigel (Jemaine Clement) once again skulks about, all on the way to a happy ending you'll see coming a mile away.

A movie like this is made and scheduled because it is a property that Fox wants to keep active, not out of any particular need in storytelling. Carlos Saldanha is a reliable co-ordinator for this kind of bright, colorful, kid-friendly property. The palette of the movie is once again eye-popping and vivid, and it's apparent that the Blue Sky team has gotten to a place where they are capable of enormous technical sophistication. Looking at the actual craft of the animation, they're very impressive. There's some very strong character performance work that is made more memorable because of the mannerisms of real birds that they use. But all of it is in service to a disappointingly familiar overall piece of work.

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<p>Zach Braff plays a dad who is struggling to hold his family together while figuring out his own path in life in &#39;Wish I Was Here&#39;</p>

Zach Braff plays a dad who is struggling to hold his family together while figuring out his own path in life in 'Wish I Was Here'

Credit: Focus Features

First trailer for Zach Braff's 'Wish I Was Here' wisely emphasizes mood over plot

This one's very simple and very special

Zach Braff's new film "Wish I Was Here" had its premiere at this year's Sundance Film Festival, and I reviewed it out of that first screening. At the time, I didn't even think about the film as being potentially controversial. It's such a sincere, sweet, sharply-performed film that it seemed like an easy one to recommend.

I guess I was absent from the Film Critics Union meeting where we all decided that we're not allowed to like Braff's work anymore, past or present. That same meeting must have been where we all decided that because he used Kickstarter to help make the film, we must automatically hate the movie and review the way it was made rather than the film itself.

Already, I'm seeing plenty of snark today in response to the trailer for the film. Allow me to offer a counterpoint to that by saying that the trailer does a nice job of suggesting the tone of the film without giving away the entire thing. A good deal of the trailer is built around a few specific scenes in the film, presented here in a way that isn't about giving you story so much as a mood.

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<p>Agent May is just one of the characters who gets put through the ringer in tonight&#39;s episode of &#39;Marvel&#39;s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.&#39;</p>

Agent May is just one of the characters who gets put through the ringer in tonight's episode of 'Marvel's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.'

Credit: ABC/Marvel Studios

'Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.' promises big changes, but does it deliver?

How do we feel now that they've paid off the season's biggest storyline?

One of the greatest acts of sleight of hand involved with telling any ongoing narrative, whether it's a TV show or a comic book or a movie franchise, is giving the impression that you are creating major permanent changes in the story without burning down all the things that drew the audience to the thing in the first place.

When you've got a show like "Marvel's Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.," that's not a danger because this entire season has been a struggle for the show to find its voice and build a narrative head of steam, and any adjustments they make right now can only work to the show's advantage. It helps that last week's episode and this week's are both directly tied to the events of "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," since the film definitely shook up the status quo of the Marvel Movie Universe.

Of course, you can't just shake things up for the sake of doing so, either. That's no better than simply telling the same dull story without any adjustments. For it to really work, major changes have to offer something thematically important to the story, or they have to organically tie in to what's come before. It's a balancing act, and I don't envy the creative team behind "S.H.I.E.L.D." The pressure had to be monumental to get tonight's episode right, and it feels like they've finally paid off much of what they've been doing over the last sixteen hours of the series.

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