<p>Yeah, that's pretty much exactly how I&nbsp;remember my prom, too.</p>

Yeah, that's pretty much exactly how I remember my prom, too.

Credit: MGM/UA

Chloe Grace Moretz gets in touch with her powers in the new 'Carrie' trailer

How has Kimberly Pierce made this new version feel contemporary?

When I first heard about the casting for Kimberly Pierce's "Carrie," I thought she was making a mistake.

Don't get me wrong. I think Chloe Grace Moretz is very talented. The problem seemed to me to be that Moretz is someone who projects a self-confidence and a natural strength that makes her a tough fit for Carrie White, who is so insecure she's practically transparent. In the movie "Let Me In," it is young Kodi Smit-McPhee who plays the weak one, and Moretz is the stronger friend who teaches him how to take some control over his life. As Hit Girl, Moretz is a deadly little whirling dervish, afraid of nothing.

When I was on the set of "Kick-Ass 2" in November of last year, Moretz had just come off of this experience, and she was still mulling over the experience. She is almost always accompanied by her brother Trevor, her acting coach, and her mother, and the two of them talked candidly with me about how hard a project "Carrie" turned out to be and what an emotional experience it was. They seemed to feel that it was a very difficult thing to get right, and that Kimberly Pierce had, at the very least, a clear idea of why she wanted to tell the story again and how that story might be relevant to kids dealing with a modern type of bullying.

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<p>Lorraine Warren was proud to appear at WonderCon to discuss 'The Conjuring'</p>

Lorraine Warren was proud to appear at WonderCon to discuss 'The Conjuring'

Credit: HitFix

Lorraine Warren speaks to the true story behind this summer's 'The Conjuring'

Want to see who Vera Farmiga plays in the movie?

Whether or not I believe Lorraine Warren is not the point.

This past weekend, I moderated a panel at WonderCon that previewed both "Pacific Rim" and "The Conjuring," and when I first spoke to Warner Bros. about doing that, they mention that there was a chance Lorraine Warren would be part of the panel. Growing up in the '70s, I was aware of her name because of her involvement with the investigation around "The Amityville Horror," and I remember hearing her name-checked as a partial inspiration for the Beatrice Straight character in "Poltergeist" as well.

Last year, I saw a documentary called "My Amityville Horror" that looks at the adult life of Daniel Lutz, the youngest kid from the family that was the focus of the famous story. He's grown up with people always knowing that about him, and it's obviously left a very deep mark on who he is as a man. Lutz struck me as a clenched fist, a guy who is angry and sad and frustrated and unable to fix himself, and part of the issues that define his life deal with the way people perceive him.

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<p>Roger Ebert, seen here with his wife Chaz in 2010, was an inspiration both professionally and personally.</p>

Roger Ebert, seen here with his wife Chaz in 2010, was an inspiration both professionally and personally.

Credit: AP Photo/Matt Sayles

My weekend in Champaign-Urbana with Roger Ebert

I look back at the moment I realized I could write criticism for a living

Was it really eleven years ago?

I don't spend much time on jealousy when it comes to the world of film-related events because I am aware that I have been blessed with dozens of amazing experiences that other people would want to have. There's one particular experience that I have kept as a personal memory until now, and I feel like if there's ever going to be a "right" moment to share it, this is it.

I'm sure you'll read many pieces today about Roger Ebert and what he meant to film criticism. I know that he was one of the first two people who helped me understand that films were more than just stories but actual art worth engaging on a deeper level. I first saw "Sneak Previews," his old-school PBS show, when I was seven, and I remember watching clips from John Carpenter's "Halloween" as Gene and Roger discussed the film and being positively terrified just at that glimpse of Michael Myers. While Roger and Gene remained part of my critical diet as I grew more and more interested in film, they were not the only critics I listened to or liked, and as time passed and their show continued to change, it became less essential to me as a viewer. Part of that was because I started to realize how often I disagreed with the two of them, and at a certain point in my younger life, I thought you were supposed to read critics you agreed with, a belief I thankfully no longer hold.

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<p>Tom Hanks, Moonwatcher, and Indiana Jones are just a few of the new friends my kids will be meeting during the First Annual Film Nerd 2.0 Spring Break Film Festival.</p>

Tom Hanks, Moonwatcher, and Indiana Jones are just a few of the new friends my kids will be meeting during the First Annual Film Nerd 2.0 Spring Break Film Festival.

Credit: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment/MGM-UA Home Entertainment/Paramount Home Video

Want to play along with a Film Nerd 2.0 film festival this weekend?

We've got the titles for you now, and we'll dive in on Friday morning

The boys have been asking me lately when they are going to be able to go to a film festival with me. They have this image in their heads of what a festival is like, and I asked them to describe to me what they thought I was doing when I was gone.

More than anything, what our conversations illustrated clearly is that the boys want to participate more in the things that they believe are important to me, and I want them to feel like they have some sense of what it is that I do. We're reaching the end of their two weeks of spring break, and I realized that we could do something special for them here at the house, and that with just a little bit of effort, it could be the sort of thing that they never forget.

To that end, I've decided that this weekend is the First Annual Film Nerd 2.0 Spring Break Mini Film Festival. I'm making badges for them so they feel like they're at a festival, and I'll make them line up outside the office between movies while I change discs so they won't know what's coming next. I plan to keep the line-up a surprise from them until each film begins. In some cases, these are films they've been asking for, and in some cases, they're films I was planning to share, and in every case, they are films that I think will spark some sort of big reaction.

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<p>Danny McBride seems to have made it out of the bloodthirsty improvisations that were part of the making of 'This Is The End.'</p>

Danny McBride seems to have made it out of the bloodthirsty improvisations that were part of the making of 'This Is The End.'

Credit: HitFix

Danny McBride tells us that the gloves came off for 'This Is The End'

Was anything off-limits between the cast when they start riffing off each other?

I'm curious to see what the long-term arc of Danny McBride's career looks like.

Right now, I still feel like Hollywood's trying to figure him out, and vice versa. He's had his shot in a few films, and he's played a lot of supporting parts, and overall, I think we've seen some of what he's capable of, but not anywhere near all of it.

McBride's a better actor than he seems to be given credit for, and I guess part of that is that the comedy persona he's created seems larger than life in some ways, full of swagger, and I think people honestly believe that's who he really is. If he was really just Kenny Powers, and there was no difference between the two of them, I can't imagine anyone wanting to work with him twice. The real McBride strikes me as a smart guy who knows what his own comfort zone is, and he's been able so far to craft comedy material that fits him easily.

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<p>Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins made an absolute meal out of the script that Ruth Prawer Jhabvala wrote for 'The Remains Of The Day'</p>

Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins made an absolute meal out of the script that Ruth Prawer Jhabvala wrote for 'The Remains Of The Day'

Credit: Sony Pictures

Remembering the Oscar-winning screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

We look back at the work of a great writer who stayed out of the limelight

There are very few pieces of art that I consider flawless. If anything, flaws are part of what makes art fascinating. Once in a long while, though, I see something or read something that I consider a perfect execution of an idea, and one of the examples I'd give would be "The Remains Of The Day," the 1993 film starring Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson. Adapted from the Kazuo Ishiguro novel, the film is exquisitely crafted, and that script is remarkable for the way it communicates volumes of material with a single gesture. Anthony Hopkins is one of those guys who can ham it up when you ask him to, but the challenge of this script was to keep almost everything internal, and Hopkins rose to the challenge with what I would argue is one of the finest examples of film acting I've ever seen. Yes, it helps when you have Hopkins and Thompson at the top of their game, but that script is something else. You could teach an entire class on adaptation just by taking that film and comparing it to the source material.

Oddly, that's the one time she was nominated for an Oscar without winning. She took home the award for both "A Room With A View" and "Howard's End," although she didn't show up to accept either award. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever seen her interviewed or really learned much of anything about her. She was simply a constant presence in the world of highbrown period films for adults, a name you would see on a poster that automatically suggested a certain kind of polished, contemplative drama.

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<p>You'd smile like that, too, if you knew your movie was going to destroy audiences this summer.</p>

You'd smile like that, too, if you knew your movie was going to destroy audiences this summer.

Credit: HitFix

James Wan talks about redefining himself after 'Saw' with 'The Conjuring'

A genre filmmaker reinvents himself and we talk about how he did it

One thing's certain: it's hard to forget James Wan after you meet him.

For example, I've never heard anyone who worked with him have a bad word to say about the guy. That's genuinely unusual in this business, and you can't overrate the impression it makes on people. For another thing, you almost can't believe how wildly "Crocodile Dundee" he gets when he speaks. I think that's what I love about Australian accents in general... you can't go too big when imitating them, because they are big accents to begin with.

The last time I spoke to him, he was joined by his writing partner Leigh Wannell at the Magic Castle, part of the press day for "Insidious," and he seemed happy with the reactions he was getting for that one. One of the things we discussed in this new interview is how he's finally become more than just "the director of 'Saw,'" and how hard it is to be defined by the success of your first film no matter what else you do.

I think Wan won't have to worry about that after "The Conjuring" is released in July. It feels like he figured something out a few years ago and refocused himself, and the result has been a new energy to his filmmaking. During the WonderCon panel, as the clips were playing, I watched him watching the crowd, and every time they jumped or reacted or anytime someone tried to break the nervous tension in the room, Wan looked delighted. He genuinely loves the emotional experience of scaring the holy hell out of people, and he's more in touch with that skill set now than ever before.

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<p>Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman are both back and together in Asgard in some of the first footage from 'Thor:&nbsp;The Dark World'</p>

Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman are both back and together in Asgard in some of the first footage from 'Thor: The Dark World'

Credit: Marvel Studios

Marvel unleashes a flood of concept art and new footage with 'Phase Two' featurette

Want to see shots from 'Thor 2,' 'Ant-Man' test footage, and some new 'Guardians' designs?

When I wrote about my always-evolving feelings towards spoilers last week, I got several e-mails from people asking if that means I'll never write about a movie during production again.

Of course not.

It just means that I am trying to be more conscious of what I say about something while it's being made, and I want to try to safeguard your experience with a film. I don't want to be the reason someone has to scrap an idea again, and I've put my foot in it enough times that I'm trying to figure out how to do my job better.

Now, when a studio decides to release a big sneak peek like Marvel did with the Phase One box set they put out, I consider that fair game. I would still warn that if you don't want to know anything, don't look at the gallery we've attached below, but if you don't mind being teased a bit, I think this is a great job of showing us enough to get fans talking but not enough to ruin anything they've got coming between now and "The Avengers 2."

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<p>Jane and Jim Henson surrounded by their earliest creations on the set of 'Sam &amp;&nbsp;Friends'</p>

Jane and Jim Henson surrounded by their earliest creations on the set of 'Sam & Friends'

Credit: The Henson Company

We celebrate the life of Jane Henson, the unsung hero of the Muppets

Jim Henson's wife was a huge part of helping to found the beloved characters

Jane Henson may not have been the same sort of household name that her husband, the late Jim Henson, was, but her contributions to the work that Henson did were essential, and without her, who knows if we would have ever enjoyed the genius and the humanity of Henson's various creations?

She met Jim in the early days, when they were both still students, and when he worked on his first major television project, a show called "Sam and Friends," she was one of the Muppet performers, right there alongside her husband. It has been said that she was the one who first proposed the system that allowed them to see monitors as they performed, so they had some sense of how their work was playing.

It wasn't until the late '50s that the two of them began a personal relationship away from work, and they had a total of five children together, including Brian and Lisa, who both followed their parents into the family business. When Jane stopped performing, it was Frank Oz who was hired to take her place, and she's the one who trained him and got him ready to perform. Even once she was not officially a Muppet performer, she would frequently jump in for big scenes where there needed to be a lot of Muppets at the same time.

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<p>Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg seemed pleased to discuss their new film 'This Is The End' at Wondercon last weekend.</p>

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg seemed pleased to discuss their new film 'This Is The End' at Wondercon last weekend.

Credit: HitFix

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg discuss making the jump to directing with 'This Is The End'

They promise gleeful gore and ball-busting galore

You want to see what I look like when my brain shuts down for no good reason right in the middle of an interview? Well, today's your lucky day.

I've spoken with Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg dozens of times over the years, and I always enjoy seeing them and talking about what they're doing. Yet for some reason, as I'm making the introduction in this piece, you'll see me completely blank on Evan's name. It's just a few seconds, but internally, it was a full-system reboot, one of those "what did I just do?!" moments.

Thankfully, Evan and Seth laughed it off and we had a great chat about their first film as co-directors, "This Is The End," which arrives in theaters later this year. On the 16th of this month, I'll be publishing some observations and interviews from my time on the set of the film in Louisiana last year, and we'll have longer interviews with both Craig Robinson and Danny McBride this week that we did at WonderCon. That's the long way of saying, "We've got a lot to share with you."

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