The Sony hack story is going to keep unfolding and there will be no shortage of opinions and takeaways. Writer Aaron Sorkin already took aim at the media for its behavior in the early days of the dust-up, sentiments echoed by "Nightcrawler" writer/director Dan Gilroy, whose film is very much about ethical slippage in journalism. Well, the "Newsroom" creator and "Social Network" screenwriter fired back yet again today after news broke that North Korea was, according to the FBI, "centrally involved" in the hack.

To wit:

Today the U.S. succumbed to an unprecedented attack on our most cherished, bedrock principle of free speech by a group of North Korean terrorists who threatened to kill moviegoers in order to stop the release of a movie. The wishes of the terrorists were fulfilled in part by easily distracted members of the American press who chose gossip and schadenfreude-fueled reporting over a story with immeasurable consequences for the public — a story that was developing right in front of their eyes. My deepest sympathies go out to Sony Pictures, Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg and everyone who worked on "The Interview."

Meanwhile, I'd like to point you to another piece that I wholeheartedly agree with, Devin Faraci's suggestion that the Academy hand some breed of honorary achievement to directors Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg for producing, inarguably I would imagine, what has become the most important film of the year, if not the decade. It would be a grand gesture that art of any perceived quality has value and should not be suppressed. That is the part of the bedrock of the nation, isn't it?

Is that a bridge too far or precisely what is called for? You tell me.

Kristopher Tapley has covered the film awards landscape for over a decade. He founded In Contention in 2005. His work has also appeared in The New York Times, The Times of London and Variety. He begs you not to take any of this too seriously.