Even for those of us who enjoy the red-carpet portion of awards season, the vacant questions and 360-degree cameras that female stars must face from the likes of E! have become a bit exasperating. But as Hadley Freeman notes, the women are beginning to fight back against this institution, with stars like Jennifer Lawrence, Emma Thompson and Elisabeth Moss making a point of rebelling against red-carpet routine, whether by photobombing fellows stars or giving the finger to the (ugh) "manicam." "We have reached peak red carpet," writes Freeman. "It's all just got too stupid and too hysterical, and there are too many savvy, funny women working in the industry to put up with this bullshittery any more, or to swallow the old line that any bad behaviour on the red carpet could destroy their career." [The Guardian]

As if Jared Leto's campaign wasn't going well enough, he just distinguished himself by having a "heart-to-heart" with a heckler who took issue with him playing a transgendered role. [The Wrap]

"The Grandmaster" picked up a leading 14 nominations for the Hong Kong Film Awards. [Variety]

Paul Greengrass has been selected by BAFTA to deliver this year's annual David Lean Lecture on March 18. [Screen Daily]

Scott Feinberg reports from the Santa Barbara fest's Virtuoso Awards, where Oscar nominees Jared Leto and June Squibb were among the seven actors feted. [Hollywood Reporter]

Scott Timberg on how this year's Oscar nominees are indicative of contemporary's reluctance to engage with the issues of the day. [Salon]

Oscar nominee Bruno Delbonnel talks about arriving at the distinctive tone and palette of "Inside Llewyn Davis." [American Cinematographer]

John Hurt becomes the latest "Snowpiercer" star to speak out against The Weinstein Company's editing of the film. [HeyUGuys]

"Dallas Buyers Club" director Jean-Marc Vallee talks to Mekado Murphy about his approach to filming and "letting the shots breathe." [New York Times]