While the ever-growing club of "Perks of Being a Wallflower" fans are crossing their fingers for a screenplay Oscar nod in the next hour or so, the film's word-of-mouth success was rewarded last night with a People's Choice Award win for Best Dramatic Movie (and Best Dramatic Actress for Emma Watson). It's easy to mock these awards, but it's nice to see actual evidence that this little film has connected with audiences out in the real world. More predictably, "The Hunger Games" took the top award, while Jennifer Lawrence took two prizes, for Best Actress and Face of Heroism -- it's safe to say "Silver Linings Playbook" didn't factor into either of these. Other film category winners include "Ted," Chris Hemsworth, Meryl Streep and Jennifer Aniston -- hey, these awards aren't so bad. [Yahoo!

Perhaps not too surprisingly, not everyone sees the funny side of those campy "Django Unchained" action figures. [Wall Street Journal

Jon Weisman considers the implications, such as they are, of Steven Spielberg's BAFTA miss, and his curious absence from almost all the critics' awards. [The Vote]

Melena Ryzik invites a host of past Oscar honorees, from Sally Field to Tom Hooper, to reflect on their Academy Award experiences. [The Carpetbagger

In a field heavy on former winners and nominees, which first-timers will be admitted to the Oscar club? [Entertainment Weekly]

Speaking of which, Daniel Montgomery wonders if Eddie Redmayne can beat the odds and nab a supporting nod for "Les Mis." Some pundits are actually going there, but missing with BAFTA wasn't a good sign. [Gold Derby]

The piece is a year old, but the author resurrected it on Twitter because it's just as applicable this year: why the Razzie Awards are a waste of time. [Gawker]

Mike D'Angelo offers an appreciation of Wes Anderson's efforts to keep the montage alive in "Moonrise Kingdom." [The AV Club]

Looking beyond Oscar, Michael Cusumano finds five reasons to believe Woody Allen's "Blue Jasmine" will be one of his good ones. The cast is great, but you knew that without looking. [The Film Experience]

Ryan Gilbey offers an affectionate appreciation of "Snakes on a Plane" director David R. Ellis's career. Ellis passed away on Monday. [The Guardian]