When the Oscar nominations are announced in exactly two weeks' time (!), they'll be a pioneering edition in two ways: not only will they land earlier in the season than ever before, but they'll be the first to be partially drawn from electronic voting. It's a brave new world and all, but after interviewing a cross-section of voters, Many of them aren't happy with the changes -- to the point that some of them, short of time to see the necessary films and/or befuddled by the security surrounding the online ballot -- may not bother voting at all. Scott Feinberg quotes one member as saying, "There will probably be a large percentage of people who will just say, 'Screw it,' and not even vote this year," and expresses concern that the changes could result in a record low in voter anticipation. Of course, we'll never know. [The Race]

Roger Ebert unveils his Top 10, and names "Argo" the best film of 2012. Another feather in the cap for Ben Affleck's steadfast crowdpleaser; I'm keeping my Best Picture money on it. [Chicago Sun-Times]

DGA president (and Oscar-nominated director) Taylor Hackford interviewed Quentin Tarantino about "Django Unchained" at the film's Guild screening. [Thompson on Hollywood]

Manohla Dargis celebrates two contrasting love stories in the Oscar race: "Amour" and "Silver Linings Playbook." [New York Times

With "Les Mis" currently burning up the box office, will its popular appeal override its mixed critical reception to triumph in the Oscar race? [Gold Derby]

From "Best Exotic" to "Beasts," Pat Saperstein looks at the biggest stories in independent cinema this year. [Variety]

Wes Anderson chats to Glenn Whipp about the process of writing "Moonrise Kingdom" -- and forthcoming follow-up "The Grand Budapest Hotel." [LA Times

The Playlist staff construct an alternative ballot for Best Director -- only one of the names on it, Paul Thomas Anderson, has a prayer at showing up on the Academy's version. [The Playlist]

Jaime Esteve Bengoechea responds to those critics taking "The Impossible" to task for its Hollywood-tailored demographics: take the movie for what it is, not what it isn't. [ICS]

The Guardian gears up for the New Year with a gallery of 100 films to look forward to in 2013. [The Guardian]