There may still be a question mark over how well "The Master" goes over with the Academy, but there's little doubt that Joaquin Phoenix is primed for a nomination (at least) for his blazing performance in it. When he gets it, however, it'll be without any help from the actor himself, who has made it quite clear he has no interest in the whole ritual of awards season whatsoever. His interview with Elvis Mitchell touches on many interesting areas, but here are his thoughts on the Oscar-chasing business: "I think it's total, utter bullshit, and I don't want to be a part of it. I don't believe in it... Pitting people against each other . . . It's the stupidest thing in the whole world. It was one of the most uncomfortable periods of my life when 'Walk the Line' was going through all the awards stuff and all that. I never want to have that experience again." Guess he won't be coming to the ceremony, then. [Interview

The cinephile world is morning the loss of veteran Japanese director Koji Wakamatsu, whose last film premiered at Venice in September. [Fandor

Having seen "Rise of the Guardians," Scott Feinberg believes it's the film to beat for the Best Animated Feature Oscar. I'm still struck by just how ugly it looks. [The Race]

Dave Karger looks at how some of this year's Best Picture contenders fall into proven Oscar themes and patterns. Not sure how "Django Unchained" is a "little movie that could," though. [USA Today]

Oscar-nominated sound designer Erik Aadahl talks about creating a soundscape for the tension-fuelled "Argo." [Below the Line]

Sam Mendes talks to Dave Calhoun about making James Bond his own, and why he's willing to do it all over again. [Time Out London]

Mourning the loss of Harris SAvides, Jason Bailey lists his 10 favorite working cinematographers. To each his own, of course, but I'd say the list is incomplete without Robbie Ryan. [Flavorwire]

Ezra Miller and "Les Mis" newcomer Samantha Barks are among the rising stars due to receive Spotlight Awards at the Hollywood Film Awards. [LA Times]

Promoting his directorial debut "Quartet," Dustin Hoffman gave a tearful on-stage interview at BAFTA in London. [Screen]

Jon Weisman doesn't think the addition of Tina Fey and Amy Poehler will make much of a difference to the Golden Globes' ratings. [Variety]