The word "snub" is one we all abuse on occasion -- I prefer "not nominated," since it doesn't imply active antagonism -- and I've seen it used a lot lately about Leonardo DiCaprio. It doesn't seem justified in his case either, given that the Academy evidently has a lot of respect for someone they've nominated three times, but it's true that he does boast more near-misses than most working actors today. Daniel Montgomery, meanwhile, notices an interesting anomaly: he's starred as a lead in six Best Picture nominees -- usually a decent route to Oscar attention -- but has only been nominated for one of them. Of course, "Django Unchained," in which he came up against unfortunate internal competition, is the latest example of this odd phenomenon. [Gold Derby

Here's a pretty heroic feat of Oscar geekery: in honor of Emmanuelle Riva, who will turn 86 on the night of the Oscars, Nathaniel Rogers lists the 100 oldest living Oscar nominees. (Riva, incidentally, only ranks at #67.) [The Film Experience

Jodie Foster's much-parsed Golden Globes speech continues to be the principal talking point of the Golden Globes. Sam Leith believes it to be a moment of genius, and celebrates Foster's command of rhetoric. [The Guardian

In what will probably be a less left-field Lifetime Achievement Award acceptance, Alec Baldwin and Carl Reiner will present Dick Van Dyke with his at the SAG Awards. [Playbill]

Jon Weisman advises us not to read to much into the Globe awards when assessing the Oscar race, stating that the lack of a directing nod for "Argo" leaves it no higher than #6 in the Best Picture running. I disagree. [The Vote]

Tom Shone, on the other hand, thinks Ben Affleck's film now presents a highly compelling underdog narrative to Academy voters. (After all, the vast majority of them had no hand in the Best Director noms.) [The Guardian]

Still on the Globes, those grumpy reaction shots from Tommy Lee Jones -- not usually the smiliest of figures, to be fair -- have apparently gone viral. [LA Times

Brian Grasko analyzes how Quentin Tarantino's films talk to another -- and talk back to their critics. [Salon

US indies, including Sundance-bound directorial efforts from James Franco and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, feature prominently in the Panorama lineup for next month's Berlin Film Festival. [Berlinale]

It may not be obvious to the naked eye, but Carrie Rickey explains why 2012 represented a small advance for woman filmmakers in the industry, as 9% of the year's top 250 grossers were female-helmed. [New York Times]