Not much news out there that isn't focused on the vastly gratifying result of yesterday's election: well done, America. But to switch gears to movie matters, are you among those totally psyched for the new frame-rate technology set to be showcased in "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey?" Hard luck if you are, since it's been announced that just 450 theaters across the US will be screening the film in the 48-frames-per-second format -- a little over one-tenth of the likely screen count. Hardly a surprising turn of events after the largely tepid response to the 48fps footage screened at Comic-Con: while some advocates claimed to be seeing the future of cinema, many others found the future of cinema looked too much like hi-def TV for their liking. Will you be seeking it out in the new format? [LA Times

Okay, back to politics for a minute: Tina Daunt examines the possible effects Barack Obama's re-election will have on Hollywood. [THR

"Skyfall' continues to burn up the UK box office: after taking a record $85m in 10 days, it's already the 13th-highest grosser of all time. [The Guardian]

With several of the submissions playing at the AFI Fest, Michael Nardine does some Best Foreign Language Film handicapping. I think he's possibly dismissing some titles too hastily -- and "The Hunt" wasn't eligible for submission this year. [LA Weekly]

As audiences and critics alike stretch to interpret "Cloud Atlas," Ebert advocates keeping it simple. [Roger Ebert]

Tariq Khan remembers some of the biggest landslide acting victories in recent Oscar history. [Gold Derby

Terrence Rafferty weighs up the literary fidelity of Joe Wright's "Anna Karenina" against previous screen adaptations. [New York Times]

"Les Miserables" unveils a new TV spot -- "vivid and special," sez Jeff Wells, though that voiceover is surely beyond parody. [Hollywood Elsewhere]

Mark London Williams looks into the technological innovations of "Wreck-It Ralph." [Below the Line]

How the casting of 66 year-old Sally Field in "Lincoln" represents a small victory against ageism in Hollywood. [Vancouver Sun]