After a year years away, Ken Loach -- king of British social realism, though he'd probably resent the royal analogy -- returned to the Berlin Film Festival last year to premiere his documentary "Spirit of '45." He'll be back next year too, this time as an honoree: he will receive the festival's Honorary Golden Bear for lifetime  achievement, while the programme will feature a retrospective of 10 of his films. Declaring him "one of Europe's great directors," Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick praised him showing "an extraordinary degree of continuity, while remaining innovative at all times. His profound interest in people and their individual fates, as well as his critical commitment to society have found expression in a variety of cinematic approaches."  [Berlinale]  

The real-life Philomena Lee, who's getting quite vocal this week, has issued a letter dismissing claims that "Philomena" is anti-Catholic. [The Guardian]

Michael Cieply on the most abrasive performance of Meryl Streep's career, in "August: Osage County." [New York Times

"The Grandmaster" leads the nominations for Asia Pacific Festival Awards. (Not to be confused with the Asia Pacific Screen Awards, which announced its nominees earlier this month.) [APFF]

Eddie Redmayne is among those involved in a push to expand BAFTA's presence in Asia. [Hollywood Reporter]

Jeremy Kay calls "American Hustle" a "brilliant late arrival" to the Oscar party. [Screen Daily]

Eric Kohn believes "Frozen" and "Saving Mr. Banks" show Disney to be at war with its own image. [Indiewire]

The New York Film Academy offers a handy cut-out-and-keep infographic of gender inequality in the film industry. [NYFA

Glenn Dunks makes a plea for Xavier Dolan's "Laurence Anyways" in the Best Costume Design category. [The Film Experience]