File this under "retirement announcements we hope are short-lived," as Kristin Scott Thomas claims that she's ending her screen career: " I cannot cope with another film. I realised I've done the things I know how to do so many times in different languages, and I just suddenly thought, I can't do it any more. I'm bored by it. So I'm stopping." Partly motivating this, she says, is the limited array of roles available to women her age: "I'm sort of, as the French would say, 'stuck between two chairs', because I'm no longer 40 and sort of a seductress, and I'm not yet a granny ... When I go to the movies, I'd rather watch people who've lived, who have gone through the mill, who've had their heart broken a million times and are still looking for love." [The Guardian]

Louise Tutts meets some of the key awards strategists on the beat, and find out how they get their films seen. [Screen Daily]

George Clooney discusses the trials and challenges involved in making "The Monuments Men." [Variety]

Joshua Hammer on the recent wave of films -- Oscar nominee "Omar" among them -- about the world of informants in the Middle East. [New York Times]

With Toronto last week having made an aggressive move on Telluride, Scott Feinberg wonders where filmmakers' festival loyalties will lie. [Hollywood Reporter]

Oscar contender "The Hunt" picked up four awards, including Best Film, at Denmark's Bodil Awards, while Charlotte Gainsbourg took Best Actress for "Nymphomaniac." [Screen Daily]

I've been waiting for someone to write this piece: Why "Frances Ha" and "Inside Llewyn Davis" are cinematic siblings. [The Dissolve]

A lovely piece by Mark Harris on the New York legacy of Philip Seymour Hoffman. [Grantland]