With Woody Allen under fire following the resurfacing of his estranged daughter's abuse allegations, and the "Alone Yet Not Alone" scandal leaving a bitter taste, Michael Cieply ponders the unexpected ethical issues that have entered this year's Oscar race. "By and large, Oscar voters are lucky if they can find time to see the nominated films, let alone sort through a court case or a secret military operation. But they, including actors, are increasingly being asked to do just that," he writes, before citing Roman Polanski's surprise 2002 win as an example of the Academy "[using] the awards to send a message about focusing on art, not behavior." [New York Times]

With voters no longer required to prove they've seen all five Best Foreign Language Film nominees, Tim Gray wonders how to keep the category fair. [Variety]

Films from Japan, Sweden and South Korea shared top honors at the Rotterdam Film Festival, while "Nebraska" took the Audience Award. [Screen Daily]

Rachel Weisz and Colin Farrell have joined the cast of Yorgos Lanthimos's very intriguing "The Lobster." [Hollywood Reporter]

In analyzing this year's troubled Best Original Song race, Eric Henderson picks up on its mixed political messages. [Slant]

Rising star Miles Teller talks about Sundance, "That Awkward Moment" and getting just famous enough. [Vulture]

On the subtle but invaluable visual effects of "Her." [Below the Line]

Celebrated tenor Placido Domingo reflects on the passing of Oscar-winning actor Maximilian Schell. [LA Times]

What an unhappy weekend it's been. The Dissolve team offer their collected remembrances of Philip Seymour Hoffman. [The Dissolve]