Leonardo DiCaprio, it seems, has never met a prestige biopic he didn't like. We've already seen his respective takes on Howard Hughes (which netted him an Oscar nod), J. Edgar Hoover and the somewhat less immediately recognizable Frank Abagnale Jr., and will soon see him as business shark turned motivational speaker Jordan Belfort in "The Wolf of Wall Street." Next up: Woodrow Wilson, 28th President of the US, already played to Oscar-nominated affect by Alexander Knox in a 1944 biopic. DiCaprio will co-produce the new film, based on a recently published biography by Pulitzer Prize winner A. Scott Berg. No denying the star's conscientiousness and commitment, but would anyone else like to see him do a romantic comedy at some point? [Deadline

Justin Chang, Peter Debruge and Scott Foundas' excellent Toronto wrap-up goes deeper than the standard-issue awards conversation. [Variety]

The National Board of review unveiled a new website, and announced tat it will reveal its award winners on December 4. [NBR]

The American Film Institute has set January 10 for its awards date -- it'll announce its annual list of film and TV honorees on December 9. [Screen Daily]

Some of you already picked up on this yesterday, but for those who missed it, David Cox brashly jumps the gun on the "12 Years a Slave" backlash. Without seeing it, of course. [The Guardian]

Five things you should know about Hayao Miyazaki's upcoming Oscar hopeful "The Wind Rises." [LA Times]

Scott Feinberg talks to IFC head Jonathan Sehrings, who's unhappy with the foreign-language Oscar system that has left "Blue is the Warmest Color" and "Like Father, Like Son" out of the running, So it goes. [THR]

No sooner has the dust settled on the Toronto premiere of a new "Therese Raquin" adaptation than Brian De Palma announces his intention to make another. [Empire]

Filming starts on "The Imitation Game," a WWII codebreaker biopic starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley. [Coming Soon]

This is a week old, but it's pretty nifty: mapping the "constellations" between directors and their favorite stars. [New York Times]