As if you ever thought otherwise, film critics are not an easily satisfied people, but we seem particularly agitated lately. In the past two weeks, we've had David Denby decrying the state of American filmmaking, Stephanie Zacharek questioning her colleagues' notions of importance, and now Andrew O'Hehir has jumped in to declare film culture dead. While conceding that plenty of good films are being made today, he wonders whether anyone outside of specialised cinephile circles really notices or cares anymore, as TV grows in water-cooler status: "I’m looking in the mirror and thinking about the purpose of what I do, which is supposed to be communicating with people, sharing ideas and generating discussion." Are film critics still doing that? And does it matter if that's becoming a more intimate, but equally impassioned conversation? I say yes and no. [Salon]  

Some changes in the Oscar-blogger universe: Sasha Stone has split from Jeff Wells and started a new podcast with Tom O'Neil. We wish them well. Check out the new duo's first effort. [Gold Derby

Francois Ozon's "In the House" won top honors at the San Sebastian Film Festival, while Spain's Oscar submission, "Blancanieves," was a multiple prizewinner. [Screen Daily]

Kicking off his annual Fifties feature, Nick Davis rounds up the best leading male performances of 2012 so far. My own such list would include four of the five names he nominates. [Nick's Flick Picks]

The brilliant Ezra Miller talks to Kate Carraway about playing a gay teen "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" and coming out in real life. [The Guardian]

David O. Russell, Amy Adams and "Anna Karenina" production designer Sarah Greenwood will all receive prizes at the Hollywood Film Awards, for whatever that's worth. [THR

Remember the Reel Geezers? Well, they're still with us, and they have thoughts on "The Master." [Thompson on Hollywood]

Oscar-nominated costume designer Sharen Davis talks to Chris Laverty about her retro inspirations for the otherwise forward-looking "Looper." [Clothes on Film]

Speaking of which, Katey Rich and Kristy Puchko debate the best forms of cinematic time-travel. [Cinema Blend]

Charlie Lyne lays out a manifesto for the modern-day teen movie, adhered to this year by only a few titles, including "21 Jump Street" and "Pitch Perfect." [Ultraculture]