So, would you like a piece of history for a steep price? If you have $3 million lying around, you can join an eBay auction for one of four original copies of Schindler's list. No, not a solid gold DVD of Steven Spielberg's 1993 Best Picture winner "Schindler's List," but an actual copy of one of Oskar Schindler's lists containing the names of 1,200 Jews whose lives the industrialist saved by hiring them as workers in his Brünnlitz factory in Switzerland.

The New York Post reports that collectors Gary Zimet and Eric Gazin are posting the item on the public auction site and are hoping it will go for as high as $5 million. They decided to use eBay, Gazin told the outlet, "because it has over 100 million worldwide members, and this is a global story." I'm sure the intentions were so noble.

"Don't miss your chance to own a piece of history that has inspired many on the difference one person can make in the face of great danger," the listing reads. "This exceedingly rare original Schindler’s List is the only one ever on the market. It emanates from the family of Itzhak Stern, Schindler’s accountant and right hand man (played by Ben Kingsley in the Academy Award-winning film). There are 3 others known which are in institutional hands. It is 14 pages in length and lists 801 male names, dated April 18, 1945. It is guaranteed authentic."

A carbon copy of the list was discovered in 2009 at the State Library of New South Wales by workers looking through the research materials of author Thomas Keneally, who wrote the 1982 book "Schindler's Ark" upon which Spielberg's film was based. That document was given to Keneally two years before and inspired him to write the book.

But this isn't a carbon copy. This is the real deal for whatever rich soul wants to line Zimet and Gazin's pockets, so pony up!

"Schindler's List" won seven Oscars including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay. It's widely considered one of the greatest films ever made, landing at #9 on the AFI's list of the greatest American films in 1997 and at #8 when the list was revisited 10 years later. I humbly suggest Spielberg himself made five better films, but hey, that's just me.

Now, get out your wallets and head over to eBay...