The number of design changes and behind-closed-doors shake-ups surrounding Aaron Sorkin’s Steve Jobs biopic would likely do the Apple Computers mastermind proud. The movie lost stars, lost directors, and, most recently, lost its studio home. But by the time the movie hits theaters, that meta-narrative will be an afterthought. Suffer in private or public — it doesn’t really matter, as long as the finished product blows the paying customers away. And it certainly could, now that someone has decided to make the thing.

After living at Sony for two years, executives at the studio decided to kick Sorkin’s picture to the curb earlier in November. Now, according to The Hollywood Reporter, Universal has taken in the orphaned prestige project with an eye towards production. According to the trade’s sources, Danny Boyle remains on-board to direct the project, based on Walter Isaacson’s biography "Steve Jobs," with Michael Fassbender still attached to the lead role. Universal picked up the project, whose production costs are rumored to be around $30 million. Scott Rudin, Mark Gordon and Guymon Casady will produce the film.

Why did Sony get cold feet? Still unknown. But even when it was at its original studio, the project was attracting big names. Leonardo DiCaprio and Christian Bale were both connected to the Steve Jobs role at different points in development. Sorkin originally planned to reteam with his "Social Network" director David Fincher for the film, before pay days became a deciding factor. Before the drop and pick-up, Seth Rogen was eying the role of Apple Co-Founder Steve Wozniak; THR does not indicate whether the actor is still involved.

There’s no word on when the Steve Jobs biopic will roll camera, though if the creative team was mimicking Jobs' production style, they’d be halfway done with the film already.

Matt Patches is a writer and reporter based in New York. His work has appeared on Grantland, New York Magazine's Vulture,, and The Hollywood Reporter. He thinks Groundhog Day is perfect.