It's nice that the Hollywood Foreign Press Association opted, finally, for a woman to receive its Cecil B. DeMille Award, analogous to a lifetime achievement honor. Sure, Lucille Ball, Joan Crawford, Doris Day, Judy Garland, Audrey Hepburn, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine and Elizabeth Taylor have received the distinction over the years, but the last time a woman received the special Golden Globe was 12 years ago when Barbra Streisand won it.

The stated criteria for the Cecil B. DeMille Award is for individuals who have made an impact on entertainment. And Foster certainly qualifies. Ever since she leaped onto the scene in 1976's "Taxi Driver" (from fellow DeMille-recipient Martin Scorsese), Foster has been a leading force in the industry.  She's won two Best Actress Oscars (for "The Accussed" and "The Silence of the Lambs") and been nominated for one more ("Nell"). She was also nominated for Best Supporting Actress for the aforementioned "Taxi Driver."

The Globes failed to cite her for her Scorsese's film but certainly made up for it that year by handing her a nomination for Best Actress in a Comedy or Musical for "Freaky Friday." In addition to the three leading roles for which she was recognized by the Academy, the HFPA has also nominated her for "Contact," "The Brave One" and "Carnage."

And if she got started at a young age then she's in keeping with that now, as at 49 years old, Foster is the youngest recipient of the award since Charlton Heston in 1967.

“Jodie is a multifaceted woman that has achieved immeasurable amounts of success and will continue to do so in her career,” HFPA president Adia Takla-O’Reilly said. “Her ambition, exuberance and grace have helped pave the way for budding artists in this business. She’s truly one of a kind.”

The 70th annual Golden Globes go down on Sunday, January 13 and they'll be hosted by ladies as well: Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. Nominations will be announced on Thursday, December 13.