<p>Mickey Sumner and Greta Gerwig in &quot;Frances Ha.&quot;</p>

Mickey Sumner and Greta Gerwig in "Frances Ha."

Credit: IFC Films

From 'Inside Llewyn Davis' to 'Frances Ha,' the consensus favorites of year-end polls

And most of them aren't even in the Best Picture race

It seems a long time ago that many breathless journos in Telluride and Toronto were predicting one film to rule them all when it came to year-end accolades: "12 Years a Slave," we were told, was such a cast-iron critical phenomenon that every other film would have to consider itself unlucky to be released in its shadow. As we now know, things didn't quite pan out that way: Steve McQueen's formidable historical drama may have gobbled up an enviable amount of awards on the US critical circuit thus far, and is poised for a leading haul of Oscar nods, but the year-end discussion of the year's best films has, happily, been far more malleable and wide-ranging than initially predicted.

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<p>Oscar Isaac in &quot;Inside Llewyn&nbsp;Davis&quot;</p>

Oscar Isaac in "Inside Llewyn Davis"

Credit: CBS Films

Tell us what you thought of 'Inside Llewyn Davis'

The Coen brothers' latest moved out into wide release this weekend

I held off on this one until the film made its way out into wider release, which it did on Friday. I'm very eager to know what readers think of the Coen brothers' "Inside Llewyn Davis," which was my #3 film of the year and just a rich experience that delivers more and more upon subsequent viewings. The work from T Bone Burnett on the soundtrack, curating a spectacular, thematically relevant assortment of period songs and then producing gorgeous new renditions is the kind of thing that deserves its own category. And Oscar Isaac delivers the year's best performance, one I delighted in mulling over in my lengthy interview with the actor. I could really go on, but again, I want to know what you all thought, so when you get around to seeing the film, tell us what you thought in the comments section below and vote in our poll. (Also, if you happened to catch the "Another Day, Another Time" concert documentary on the film, which T Bone Burnett discussed with us here, tell us what you thought of that, too.)

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<p>Tom&nbsp;Hanks in &quot;Saving&nbsp;Mr. Banks&quot;</p>

Tom Hanks in "Saving Mr. Banks"

Credit: Walt Disney Pictures

Tell us what you thought of 'Saving Mr. Banks'

Disney's Disney glorification is in theaters in time for the holiday

Lots of drama -- certainly in the pages of LA Weekly -- met the release of "Saving Mr. Banks," though certainly the studio ought to have known it was coming. A whitewashing of history? A self-glorification that avoids the nuance? Yeah, that's all in there. It's a Disney product romanticizing a Disney product. What's to be expected? I found the film charming and Emma Thompson to be wonderful but it's really just cotton candy for me this season. And it's now in theaters for your judgment, so if you've gotten around to it, tell us your thoughts in the comments section and feel free to vote in our poll.

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<p>Leonardo DiCaprio tries to hang with an unpredictable Jack Nicholson in a scene from &quot;The&nbsp;Departed.&quot;</p>

Leonardo DiCaprio tries to hang with an unpredictable Jack Nicholson in a scene from "The Departed."

Credit: Warner Bros.

Thelma Schoonmaker recalls an unpredictable Jack Nicholson in Best Picture winner 'The Departed'

Plus: How a Chicago test screening of the film succeeded her wildest expectations

Talking with Thelma Schoonmaker recently, it became quickly apparent that I wasn't even going to scratch the surface of her career's work with Martin Scorsese in a single piece. I couldn't help but play the retrospective game with her, and while I of course didn't address all 19 feature collaborations, I was curious about six films in particular that I think represent a nice cross-section of their work together. Each of them — "Who's That Knocking At My Door," "Raging Bull," "The Last Temptation of Christ," "Goodfellas," "Bringing Out the Dead" and "The Departed" — will get its own space in the next few days.

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Leonardo DiCaprio's 10 best performances

Leonardo DiCaprio's 10 best performances

With 'The Wolf of Wall Street' on the way we look at the actor's greatest work

This holiday season brings with it all the debauchery, crookedness, triumph and tragedy of Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf of Wall Street." And all of those characteristics and more are exemplified by Leonardo DiCaprio's full-bodied, committed performance as conniving scumbag Jordan Belfort, the latest in a long line of impressive big screen portrayals from the actor.

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<p>A scene from &quot;Who's That Knocking At My&nbsp;Door&quot;</p>

A scene from "Who's That Knocking At My Door"

Credit: Warner Home Video

Thelma Schoonmaker remembers her first Scorsese collaboration: 'Who's That Knocking At My Door'

Plus: How a young Roger Ebert helped spark a hugely influential career

Talking with Thelma Schoonmaker recently, it became quickly apparent that I wasn't even going to scratch the surface of her career's work with Martin Scorsese in a single piece. I couldn't help but play the retrospective game with her, and while I of course didn't address all 19 feature collaborations, I was curious about six films in particular that I think represent a nice cross-section of their work together. Each of them — "Who's That Knocking At My Door," "Raging Bull," "The Last Temptation of Christ," "Goodfellas," "Bringing Out the Dead" and "The Departed" — will get its own space in the next few days.

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<p>&quot;The Great Beauty&quot; is Italy's Oscar hopeful this year.</p>

"The Great Beauty" is Italy's Oscar hopeful this year.

Credit: Janus Films

Profiling the foreign Oscar contenders, from 'The Grandmaster' to 'The Great Beauty'

A closer look at the nine films selected by the Academy

The Academy caught me off guard yesterday when it announced the nine finalists for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar -- I'm used to that news landing in January, and hadn't even thought to serve up any shortlist speculation or predictions. Which is just as well, since after a few years of sussing out most of their choices in advance, I'd probably have been far wide of the mark this time round. Already, three of the films I was predicting in the sidebar as eventual nominees -- Chilean crowdpleaser "Gloria," Canadian charmer "Gabrielle" and Saudi Arabian milestone "Wadjda" -- failed to make the cut.

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<p>Thelma Schoonmaker accepts her third Oscar to date for &quot;The Departed&quot;&nbsp;in 2007.</p>

Thelma Schoonmaker accepts her third Oscar to date for "The Departed" in 2007.

Credit: AP Photo

Thelma Schoonmaker talks cutting 'Wall Street' improv and learning from Martin Scorsese

We almost got 'Kill Bill'-style paired volumes out of the opus

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — Film editor Thelma Schoonmaker has been with Martin Scorsese since the beginning. Their collaboration, which extends over 19 feature films, a handful of shorts and even a Michael Jackson music video, has made for some of the richest, purest, most alive American cinema in history, and "The Wolf of Wall Street," opening next week, is just another notch on that belt.

I recently sat down with Schoonmaker to discuss all of that and more, and I don't mind saying, I couldn't help but gush. Anyone with a passion for cinema, I imagine, will fight the urge to bow at the feet of a woman like this, who has been such a consistent force behind some of the most indelible film imagery of our time.

Schoonmaker has been nominated for six Oscars for her collaborations with Scorsese, having won for "Raging Bull," "The Aviator" and "The Departed." Meeting him changed her life, as meeting her surely changed his. And that certainly came across in our hour-long conversation, which you can read through below. It's another long one, so settle in, or bookmark it and enjoy it over the holiday.

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<p>Sandra Bullock in &quot;Gravity.&quot;</p>

Sandra Bullock in "Gravity."

Credit: Warner Bros.Pictures

Dublin critics are over the moon for 'Gravity'

Interesting runners-up include 'The Act of Killing' and 'What Maisie Knew'

Greetings from Ireland -- where, coincidentally enough, I touched down shortly before the Dublin Film Critics' Circle announced their 2013 award winners. And an interesting list it is, too. Don't look for "12 Years a Slave" here -- only films released locally this year are eligible -- but "Gravity" took Best Picture, Director and Cinematography. It's the runner-up lists, however, where their individuality emerges: there are 10 or more in each category (the Irish have a funny way of counting ties, it seems), and choices range from "What Maisie Knew" for Best Picture to Brady Corbet in "Simon Killer" for Best Actor to "Ain't Them Bodies Saints" for Best Cinematography. A refreshing change from the usual-usual. Full list after the jump; check out every group's winners so far at The Circuit.

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<p>&quot;August:&nbsp;Osage&nbsp;County&quot;&nbsp;won Best Actress and Best Ensemble</p>

"August: Osage County" won Best Actress and Best Ensemble

Credit: The Weinstein Company

Nevada critics award '12 Years,' McConaughey, Streep

'Gravity' leads the field with three prizes, 'August: Osage County' wins two

The Nevada Film Critics Society has hopped on the "12 Years a Slave" bandwagon, awarding the film Best Film honors (though nothing else). Meanwhile, Alfonso Cuarón's "Gravity" picked up three prizes, including Best Director, while Meryl Streep landed her first prize of the year for her performance in "August: Osage County." Check out the full list of winners below and remember to keep track at The Circuit.

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